Deer Hunter Points Gun at Fellow Hunter

Deer Hunter Points Gun at Fellow Hunter

This is a discussion on Deer Hunter Points Gun at Fellow Hunter within the Basic Gun Handling & Safety forums, part of the General Firearm Discussion category; So what would you have done? I had my cage rattled a bit tonight. I had a bone-head scope me with his rifle while I ...

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    Member Array skunkworks's Avatar
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    Deer Hunter Points Gun at Fellow Hunter

    So what would you have done?
    I had my cage rattled a bit tonight. I had a bone-head scope me with his rifle while I was in my tree stand!
    I'm hunting private land that I lease with some other guys. This year the owner informed us that his son (in his 30's) was going to hunt the property too. It's a big piece of land and we don't pay a lot, so we decided to put up with it. The son isn't an experienced hunter, but claims he isn't new to hunting either.
    So here's what happens:
    At a little after 5pm (dark at 6pm currently) the son comes walking out of the woods carrying his climbing stand and stands at the edge of the field I'm hunting. He's about 75yds away. Before I can get my binoculars on him, he see's my orange hat and lifts his rifle and glasses me. He knew where I hunted and we confirmed 2 days before that I may be in this location or one other that concerned him on that part of the property. First I was pissed that this bone-head would be walking around and disturbing my hunting at the best time of the day to see deer in that spot. Then when I see him raise his rifle.... well let's just say "I had a moment." All I could think is "I'm strapped to this (insert expletive) tree!! For a split second I considered whether to point back, take cover, or yell at him. He continued across the field (now away from me) and proceeded to make plenty of noise unloading his gear into the back of his pickup. He slammed doors and actually slammed his tailgate TWICE! This is at 250yds away, but directly in front of me across the field. It was all over pretty quick and I haven't had a chance to calm down yet nearly 4 hours later.
    I don't know if I'm more pissed that I pay money for my hunt to be ruined or that the butt head was that negligent.

    So besides having a stiff what-for with the guy and finding another spot to hunt, what would YOU do. Has this sort of thing happened to you?
    I'll keep my freedom, my liberty, and my guns. You can keep the change.


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    What else can you do? You either call the guy on it and lose your spot or you just live with it. It stinks either way.

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    Well if he's the owners son, you probably can't get rid of him. I would tell him to use his binoculars next time he wants to look around. Pretty scary, though. I haven't had this happen that I know of, but I would be shaken by that. As for his hunting skills....well, packing up to leave an hour before dark kind of says all we need to know about his hunting prowess. Unless he had some sort of important reason to leave early, he ruined your hunt and his.

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    Member Array skunkworks's Avatar
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    Thanks for moving the thread. It does seem more appropriate here.
    I'll keep my freedom, my liberty, and my guns. You can keep the change.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skunkworks View Post
    Thanks for moving the thread. It does seem more appropriate here.


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    What you described happens far more than we think or want to believe, in my opinion. It's too easy to crank up the scope power and pan the field instead of making a point to use the binocs, if the hunter even has them.

    You're in a lousy position. You can say something to either the landowner or his son, and risk losing your lease, or say nothing and risk having it happen again. If it was me, with limited opportunity to hunt, I think I'd take a chance on not crossing paths with the son again and hold off saying anything until the season is over. After that, a direct discussion with the son is warranted, but I'd approach it diplomatically and say "I saw you scope me and it scared the heck outta me", then launch from there into a "teachable moment." In other words, approach it from an educational standpoint, rather than berating the guy for his lapse in safety.
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    All that can really be said is he scoped you, he crossed the field, and he made lots of noise. All the rest is conjecture.

    I would confront the son in a time and place of my choosing without firearms present. Clearly and politely let him know the safety violations are not acceptable. Establish the boundaries of courtesy regarding the hunting area. Be polite and firm.

    The safety violation could be ignorance and stupidity. Most likely it is. So too could crossing the field. I know I have accidentally crossed another hunters area when they were not known to be on the lease that day. It happens.
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    If somebody scoped me like that, I tell ya, I'd be a might less than diplomatic. I'd ream his...keister. You can "teach" him all about weapons safety in all sorts of ways.
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everyone you meet."
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    You have a tough call to make. Hopefully you got this "lease" in writing rather that cash and a hand shake. If you leased the hunting rights, unless you made exceptions for the owner and family, they have violated the lease agreement. An oil company won't allow the land owner to drill for oil if the oil company has purchased the mineral rights on the property.

    Perhaps your gang needs to look for other hunting grounds. At a minimum I'd address the "scoping" issue with the son or father directly and let them know in no uncertain terms that's a definite no-no.
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    You have a tough call to make. Hopefully you got this "lease" in writing rather that cash and a hand shake. If you leased the hunting rights, unless you made exceptions for the owner and family, they have violated the lease agreement. An oil company won't allow the land owner to drill for oil if the oil company has purchased the mineral rights on the property.

    Perhaps your gang needs to look for other hunting grounds. At a minimum I'd address the "scoping" issue with the son or father directly and let them know in no uncertain terms that's a definite no-no.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

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    I would lead him a little.
    "The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left." Eccl. 10:2

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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    What you described happens far more than we think or want to believe, in my opinion. It's too easy to crank up the scope power and pan the field instead of making a point to use the binocs, if the hunter even has them.

    You're in a lousy position. You can say something to either the landowner or his son, and risk losing your lease, or say nothing and risk having it happen again. If it was me, with limited opportunity to hunt, I think I'd take a chance on not crossing paths with the son again and hold off saying anything until the season is over. After that, a direct discussion with the son is warranted, but I'd approach it diplomatically and say "I saw you scope me and it scared the heck outta me", then launch from there into a "teachable moment." In other words, approach it from an educational standpoint, rather than berating the guy for his lapse in safety.
    The above is a great idea, but I'd take it up a notch if possible:

    1) If you can, buy him a small inexpensive pair of binoculars and make a gift of them to him, so "he'll have these and not need to use his scope";
    2) Suggest a joint brainstorming session, over coffee, about hunting tactics and where he hunts, where you hunt, and best times to hunt, etc. Maybe he needs a coach?
    3) Not to a make it an adversarial deal, approach it from a "Hey, I say you hunting, let's compare notes sometime" type approach
    aznav, atctimmy, mkh and 3 others like this.


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    Distinguished Member Array Paymeister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock and Glock View Post
    The above is a great idea, but I'd take it up a notch if possible:

    1) If you can, buy him a small inexpensive pair of binoculars and make a gift of them to him, so "he'll have these and not need to use his scope";
    2) Suggest a joint brainstorming session, over coffee, about hunting tactics and where he hunts, where you hunt, and best times to hunt, etc. Maybe he needs a coach?
    3) Not to a make it an adversarial deal, approach it from a "Hey, I say you hunting, let's compare notes sometime" type approach
    Brilliant!

    Dropping a few bucks for the binoculars shows immediately that you're willing to put your money where your mouth is - that is isn't a chest-thumping session.

    And what is the old saying? "Never attribute to malice what can be explained by ignorance and stupidity." Kid just may need a fatherly-arm-about-the-shoulders talk.

    ... I'd approach it diplomatically and say "I saw you scope me and it scared the heck outta me", then launch from there into a "teachable moment." In other words, approach it from an educational standpoint, rather than berating the guy for his lapse in safety.
    I agree with gasmitty: in conflict management classes it is always pointed out that "I" and "me" statements are less inflammatory than "You" statements. Example: "I worry when the bills don't get paid" versus "You don't pay the bills on time". His "I saw you scope me and it scared the heck outta me" would keep the kids ears open a lot better than "You're a jerk!"

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    I agree with the above. You MUST bring it up, but diplomatically. If he gets mad, so be it. In the end, you can hunt on the land where you can trust the other hunters or find other land. If you do nothing, you risk your life. Not worth it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paymeister View Post
    Brilliant!

    Dropping a few bucks for the binoculars shows immediately that you're willing to put your money where your mouth is - that is isn't a chest-thumping session.

    And what is the old saying? "Never attribute to malice what can be explained by ignorance and stupidity." Kid just may need a fatherly-arm-about-the-shoulders talk.



    I agree with gasmitty: in conflict management classes it is always pointed out that "I" and "me" statements are less inflammatory than "You" statements. Example: "I worry when the bills don't get paid" versus "You don't pay the bills on time". His "I saw you scope me and it scared the heck outta me" would keep the kids ears open a lot better than "You're a jerk!"
    These are actually excellent answers and responses. This from a guy that studies conflict resolution.
    "The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left." Eccl. 10:2

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