When did people start teaching trigger discipline?

This is a discussion on When did people start teaching trigger discipline? within the Basic Gun Handling & Safety forums, part of the General Firearm Discussion category; When did people start teaching trigger discipline? Might sound like a weird question but what I mean is this: I just watched El Dorado (60s?) ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: When did people start teaching trigger discipline?

  1. #1
    Ex Member Array Treo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,098

    When did people start teaching trigger discipline?

    When did people start teaching trigger discipline?

    Might sound like a weird question but what I mean is this: I just watched El Dorado (60s?) and in one scene James Caan casually points a cocked shot gun at John Wayne’s head from a foot or so away with his finger on the trigger. Now I realize it was a movie but that’s not something that a person who had been taught muzzle or trigger discipline would ever do casually and the gesture had nothing to do W/ the plot or story line.

    I also recall an episode of magnum PI (80s?) in which Magnum is shown W/ his finger on the trigger of his 1911 and you could actually see him realize what he was doing and take his finger off the trigger and place it on the frame. Again, not an acting technique but a habitual response of someone familiar W/ weapons Like the scenes in Quigley where Selleck picks up his rifle and clears the chamber.

    I also recently watched “To Hell and Back”(1955) and I noticed all through the movie that Audie Murphy had lousy trigger discipline. I point that movie out because trigger discipline is (IMO) a habit that you either have or you don’t.

    I personally don't change my behavior relative to the status of the gun so I assume Audie Murphy and Ton Selleck don't either

    Now even though I realize that this may have been due to the fact that all the guns were unloaded and everyone knew it but I watched “Uncommon Valor” (1983) the other day and all the actors there practiced strict trigger discipline.

    There was a short lived series on tv last year called "Life On Mars" The main character was a cop from 2008 who somehow got sent back in time to 1973. One of the things they did to show that Sam (the 2008 cop) was different from his 1973 co-workers is that every time he drew his gun he observed proper trigger discipline and his co-workers didn't signifying that this was a "modern" idea that wasn't practiced in 1973.

    That's kinda of my point the idea of placing your finger alongside the frame rather than on the trigger is (IMO) a relatively recent thing and I'm curious when it started becoming prevalent.


    I don’t recall an issue ever being made when I was in the army WRT to this (1988-2003)

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Member Array FreeDelivery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    132
    I, too, have noticed the habit (or lack thereof) in movies and TV shows being practiced. Instead of a time period when it becomes regular practice, I think it's more a matter of the care that the director or actor(s) take to be accurate to real-world, safe standards.

  4. #3
    VIP Member
    Array ctr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley in Virginia
    Posts
    2,314
    Hollywood is not real life. My thought is that we can't assume a timeline based on what an actor's fictional character does in a movie.

  5. #4
    VIP Member Array raevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    washington
    Posts
    4,849
    Actors take direction from Directors, if Director says finger on trigger then it is a finger on trigger. It really depends on if they have professional advicer on gun handling or not. Actors who want to work try and avoid conflict with Directors.

  6. #5
    Distinguished Member Array Stetson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Augusta,Maine
    Posts
    1,555
    I learned trigger discipline before I even picked up the old mossberg 36B.I was 7 years old. I didn't touch a handgun until I was an adult,mainly because I didn't own one.

  7. #6
    Moderator
    Array RETSUPT99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    44,556
    In the movies, they keep their finger on the trigger and have mags that hold 75 rounds.
    Anywhere else, keep your finger off the trigger...
    Last edited by RETSUPT99; January 2nd, 2010 at 11:51 AM.
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

    ***********************************
    Certified Glock Armorer
    NRA Life Member[/B]

  8. #7
    Senior Member Array dairycreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    North Plains, Oregon
    Posts
    641
    I'm 73 years old and have been shooting all of my life. I remember clearly my earliest instruction included the admonition, "keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot". Trigger discipline has been around that long for me.
    GOOD SHOOTING
    ALWAYS PROTECT YOUR VISION AND HEARING
    De gustibus non est disputandem

  9. #8
    VIP Member Array friesepferd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    east TN
    Posts
    2,341
    the idea has been along probably as long as guns.
    hopefully now some directors / actors know it well enough to do it even in movies.
    Wo die Notwehr aufhört, fängt der Mord an
    (Murder begins where self-defense ends)
    Georg Büchner

  10. #9
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S. Florida, north of the Miami mess, south of the Mouse trap
    Posts
    15,973
    If Audie Murphy wants to keep his finger on the trigger, I'm not going to argue with a certified hero!

    It's probaly a byproduct of lawsuits and Neg discharges. Back in the day when cops carried revolvers, such things weren't so common. Now, with Glocks and the like, adreneline and triggers don't mix well.
    Retired USAF E-8. Remember: You're being watched!
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  11. #10
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    texas
    Posts
    15,177
    I'm 52 shot my first 22 when I was about 10 years old,and my dad drilled the rules into me before I ever shot the gun,still have that 22 in my safe
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
    --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington , DC .

  12. #11
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,980
    "I'm 52..."

    You're a classic then Dukalmighty, like a '57 Chevy Belaire.

    I'm thinking all the best forum members are 52 and live in Texas, hah!


    We're the same age and pretty much have the same story on trigger control.

    I never was too concerned about what Hollywood was doing.

  13. #12
    Member Array TapRackBang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    432
    You can thank GLOCK..

    It was taught to prevent sympathic reflex, but I still don't remember it being preached until we switched over from revolvers to semi and then really only after Glock came out.

    I know we had at least 3 or 4 ADs right after Glocks were approved for carry...

    Then it was Katie bar the door..everyone preached finger off trigger..
    "Arms in the hands of individual citizens may be used at individual discretion..in private self defense." John Adams

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    6,781
    Quote Originally Posted by ctr View Post
    Hollywood is not real life. My thought is that we can't assume a timeline based on what an actor's fictional character does in a movie.
    Bingo. ^^

    As well speaking to history prior to roughly the 90s the vast majority of handguns one would come into contact with were revolvers...And to that it was very normal to keep the hammer down on an empty chamber, so having trigger discipline was not an item of issue or need simply because the gun was not kept in Condition 0; Chamber loaded, hammer cocked and unlocked.

    Further when autoloaders were first introduced as through to the 70s they too were regularly kept and carried same as a revolver; Condition 3; Chamber empty, hammer down, magazine or cylinder with revolvers as loaded...Requiring cycling of the action or press of the trigger to cycle the cylinder to make the gun in to Condition 0 and by that ready to fire.

    Looking at or toward Hollywood for material information is as much as a non-starter as it is to look to them for training.

    As I understand it the concept of teaching trigger control and having an 'indexed finger' is very new as circa the early 90s.
    If someone were to research this through past NRA instruction documentation I'd bet they could better and with more accuracy determine exactly when the transition began, as opposed to reviewing TV shows and movie actor practices.

    I mean heck actors still drive cars on TV and in moves with the steering wheel turned at various angles even as the vehicle is clearly being shown as traveling in a straight line, and vice versa.

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

  15. #14
    Distinguished Member Array razor02097's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,974
    I was unfortunate in that my childhood was completely gun free. I basically taught myself by reading about guns. First thing I read was about Lieutenant Colonel Jeff Cooper and all the wonderful rules and concepts he had developed. I guess from there the rest is history.
    There is something about firing 4,200 thirty millimeter rounds/min that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

  16. #15
    Member Array Backroad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Posts
    106
    Agree with the above: You can thank GLOCK for that.

    al
    "gettin' there is half the fun."

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. This could be a wedge re: “zero tolerance” discipline
    By DaveH in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: October 12th, 2010, 01:12 PM
  2. Teaching an Aussie
    By aedinius in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: May 13th, 2010, 01:25 PM
  3. Good idea, bad discipline, fatal result
    By FLSquirrelHunter in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: December 3rd, 2009, 11:39 PM
  4. Teaching a new shooter...
    By Siafu in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: January 30th, 2009, 11:25 PM
  5. Me teaching...
    By semperfi.45 in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: August 24th, 2008, 08:17 PM

Search tags for this page

history of trigger discipline
,
movie trigger discipline
,

trigger discipline

,
trigger discipline definition
,
trigger discipline history
,
trigger discipline in movies
,
trigger discipline movies
,
what is trigger discipline
,
what+is+trigger discipline
,
when did keeping finger off trigger in movies start
,
when did people start teaching
,
world war 2 trigger discipline
Click on a term to search for related topics.