How 'feelgood'' can be two way.

How 'feelgood'' can be two way.

This is a discussion on How 'feelgood'' can be two way. within the Bob & Terry's Place forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I was down at the Johnstown PA "Thunder in the Valley" today - big annual bike fest - I'll be there again tomorrow. I spent ...

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  1. #1
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    How 'feelgood'' can be two way.

    I was down at the Johnstown PA "Thunder in the Valley" today - big annual bike fest - I'll be there again tomorrow.

    I spent an hour or more checking out the vendors and had a quick snack. While sitting I watched a guy in a wheelchair working his way around the various dealers - something made me think he was a vet and probably paraplegic. He was not that well dressed and had pretty long hair but I felt he was maybe like so many Nam vets ... poorly treated and shunned by some.

    I finished my snack and decided to find out - hoping not to come over as too intrusive. I just stopped and casually asked if he was a vet - he replied yes. I asked if I could shake his hand and he offered his as I offered mine.

    I nearly didn't intrude but somehow had to - his face lit up more than I can describe. I know darned well he had to have been wishing he was one of the hundreds riding a bike. We talked only briefly - it was not the sorta exchange that required a long discourse but - the feeling of satisfaction I received from his pleasure was immeasurable.

    I hope in some small way his day was lifted - I know mine was.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


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    Distinguished Member Array Ghettokracker71's Avatar
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    Wow. That is quite possible one of the coolest things I've read in a long time. Props man. I feel as thought people are so ignorant they treat the poor serviceman like crap sometimes. If they disagree with the war, its not the man who actually was fighting the wars fault. He should be commended for standing up for his country.

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    Distinguished Member Array AnimalKracker's Avatar
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    Well done Chris. The Vets of the forgotten war deserve to be recognized as the fine young men and women that went when called, even though it was not the poplar thing to do. The media and public turned their backs on them upon returning home. Most of us know several that have been through the wringer. It helps to give them a nod and thanks.

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    Philip - I also have seen way too many of these guys - they seem to be the forgotten. Back when they most needed a job it was hard or impossible and so, many drifted into what can only be called ''existence''.

    It saddens me beyond description. Fine young men who did their nation's calling - and yet because of semantics and politics - treated so often like muck. I could go on but won't - I think you know where I am coming from ... same as many of us I expect.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

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    Chris, I am sitting here with tears running down both sides of my face. Thank you, thank you for being sensitive to the needs of this man. Although I am a vet of the Viet Nam era I was never called on to go. I know many who did. I spent most of my time in the Army training them. I felt the loss of every one that was lost from every cycle that I worked with.

    Three of my wife's 6 brothers served in country. One carries scars and shrapnel from his time there. The husband of one of her 3 sisters also served there. I have a number of cousins who served there as well. Fortunately for my family and hers we live in the deep South where the treatment received by these men was not like that they received in other parts of our country. Most of us in Alabama did not forget them, but we were a very small portion of the entire population and not in major media markets so our treatment never made headlines. Of course our treatment would not have been reported anyway - it wasn't news worth.

    Again thank you for being a real American and thanking those who have sacrificed for the freedoms we enjoy.
    George

    Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe. Albert Einstein

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    Distinguished Member Array AnimalKracker's Avatar
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    In all wars and conflicts the young loose their youth. Fortunately in the current conflict that is going on the returning men and women are not shunned and have a chance to regain a somewhat normal life. The vets of that era sometimes never got the chance to return to a normal life.

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    Senior Member Array Andy W.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P95Carry View Post
    I hope in some small way his day was lifted - I know mine was.
    I assure you that his day was lifted!

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    VIP Member Array JimmyC4's Avatar
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    That was a great move, Chris...way to go!

    There are two simple words that Vietnam vets understand well as a greeting--"Welcome Home".

    Try as I may to let go, to this day I still feel bitterness toward some people and organizations who treated me like crap when I got home in 1970. Being 100% service-connected disabled isn't a situation I ever pictured in my future, but here I am after a 30 year career in business, retired and pretty well cared for by Veterans Affairs. It is refreshing and uplifting these days to feel honored by most fellow Americans. How things have changed for the better in that regard over the last 37 years!
    "It's a big gun when I carry it, it is also a big gun when I take it out” – Clint Smith

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    I'm not sure how the country can ever heal the way the Vietnam era veteran was treated; I expect that it can't be done, sadly. Individual acts as you did are probably the best way. Kudos to you for making the guy's day and probably week....
    Bumper
    Coimhéad fearg fhear na foighde; Beware the anger of a patient man.

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    Great job, nice to thank a vet.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


    Nemo Me Impune Lacesset

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    VIP Member Array goldshellback's Avatar
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    As a military member I always try to take the time to acknowledge those who had the watch before I took the post. When someone, anyone, says something to me in the form of a "thank you" it does mean an awful lot. Thank you P95 for that gesture to one who had the watch, and paid dearly for it.
    "Just getting a concealed carry permit means you haven't commited a crime yet. CCP holders commit crimes." Daniel Vice, senior attorney for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, quoted on Fox & Friends, 8 Jul, 2008

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    We should all thank vets
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

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    Member Array DaveT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyC View Post
    That was a great move, Chris...way to go!

    There are two simple words that Vietnam vets understand well as a greeting--"Welcome Home".

    Try as I may to let go, to this day I still feel bitterness toward some people and organizations who treated me like crap when I got home in 1970. Being 100% service-connected disabled isn't a situation I ever pictured in my future, but here I am after a 30 year career in business, retired and pretty well cared for by Veterans Affairs. It is refreshing and uplifting these days to feel honored by most fellow Americans. How things have changed for the better in that regard over the last 37 years!
    JimmyC described my feelings perfectly. Being another 100% Disabled Vet from in country Vietnam service, I have also gone through the bitterness and the hard feelings that JimmyC described. But I find out more and more with each passing day that it's better for me to leave it in the past.

    P95Carry, thanks for your very thoughtful gesture to a fellow Vet. While I'm not in a wheelchair permanently yet, I have spent my share of time in both motorized and push versions. That sure changes your perspective on the world, I have found it both amazing and shocking how rude some folks in wheelchairs can be treated by others who act like they don't even see them.

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    No thanks needed Dave - in as much as I got my reward by simply doing what my instincts dictated.

    Back in UK there is an expression used to describe how some folks treat wheelchair people ... "Does he take sugar?". That came about due to some people's tendency to talk 'over' the disabled individual ... such that if they are offered a cup of tea, instead of asking them directly ''do you want sugar'' - it is sent over their head to someone else - as if they (the disabled) are somehow incapable of intelligent speech!!!

    I hate that - even more so when we are talking about guys who gave their best in an unpopular war, only to be shunned and loaded with stigma they did NOT deserve. I was lucky to never have seen combat but know many who have - the best I can do is excercize my fertile imagination - but doubt that even scratches the surface.

    Respect for others is a sadly evaporating trend these days .... but when it comes to our troops in particular, oh my, have they ever earned respect - and some.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

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    I've met the neatest people and made some good friends doing just what P95 did.

    The other day me and my son were at Petsmart picking up dog food. Two guys were unloading a motorized wheel chair from the back of a 4x4 pickup. Both being older, and one being handicapped (it was his chair) they were struggling with the weight.

    I put my dog food down in the middle of the lot, grabbed the chair from them and set it down on the ground... well you would have thought I just paid off their mortgage. Both were Vietnam vets, getting together with other vets to have dinner. We BS'd for a bit and went on our seperate ways. They were the nicest guys you could hope for.

    At face value, one would think I did them a favor... not so. First, they did me a favor all those years ago so I owed them. Then, they flipped the tables on me, and gave me the perfect chance to explain to my young son why that man could not walk, and why what they did is important to us all. So, they did once again served us instead of allowing me to serve them.
    Damn, I guess I still owe them. If I would have been thinking, I would have bought the group dinner, or at least a round of drinks.
    Last edited by SIXTO; July 27th, 2007 at 10:02 PM.
    "Just blame Sixto"

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