PTSD - Page 2

PTSD

This is a discussion on PTSD within the Bob & Terry's Place forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Originally Posted by WHEC724 This is true. However my previous comment is intentionally blunt. I believe that our society has become overly sensitive to the ...

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Thread: PTSD

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array rottkeeper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHEC724 View Post
    This is true. However my previous comment is intentionally blunt. I believe that our society has become overly sensitive to the often whimsical 'needs' of an individual. The bottom line is that life is often hard and never fair. The sooner that one embraces that and focuses their efforts on productive tasks, the healthier they tend to be.

    It will also save them a lot of money that would otherwise be spent on counseling (and I do speak with some education and experience in that regard).

    Respectfully,

    WHEC
    Agreed, It seems some do not have the ability to cope with everyday problems and that kind of goes to my point. That is not PTSD, maybe depression but not PTSD.

    There are some in the professional world that like to push a certain diagnosis and it seems PTSD AND depression are amongst them.

    Clinical depression takes away the ability for the sufferer to distinguish between everyday problems and those that are more serious. They also tend to dwell on them obsessively adding to their depression.
    For as the lightning comes from the east and flashes to the west, so also will the coming of the son of man be. Mathew 24:27

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  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rottkeeper View Post
    Clinical depression takes away the ability for the sufferer to distinguish between everyday problems and those that are more serious. They also tend to dwell on them obsessively adding to their depression.
    You make an extremely good point there, to be considered by the OP as well. Clinical depression ain't no joke, and simple 'suck it up' advice usually won't snap them out of it. One can be prescribed a 'mood elevator' or stabilizer that can snap one out of a funk and give them a leg-up to get a grip on things. These drugs do not provide a buzz or any sense of euphoria. They just break the cycle that's psychologically screwing the patient into the ground.

    I think most of us agree that 'medical marijuana' is the PC version of going down to your local bar to drown your sorrows. I can't believe that it is even offered by licensed physicians...

    And I'm still a fan of a good butt-whooping, when it's due .
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  3. #18
    Member Array Bfunk's Avatar
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    I'm 24 years old, so age wise I am pretty close to your son. I would venture to say that he is just trying to get a Rx for weed, but like others have said I am no doctor. Maybe ask his therapist/counseler if you can make an appointment with them to discuss your sons issues. They would most likely have to have his written approval. Just tell him you want to talk with the therapist directly to see what they suggest you to do to help his situation.

    I would say either he is intentionally lieing to therapist, he has been misdiagnosed, or he is lieing to you about what the therapist has said.

    Maybe a session of family counseling would be a good idea? That way you can find out what exactly is troubleing him in an environment he would feel is neutral and safe.

    I hope all works out for the best.

    edit - btw, when I was 20... a good swift kick to the butt would have done me wonders ;)
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  4. #19
    Member Array Bfunk's Avatar
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    I used to smoke weed, I no longer do. Not so much because I think it is wrong, I am pro-legalization, but because it goes directly against my career goals. Have you had problems with your son and drugs before? Even if he's making things up to try and get a Rx, there are far less serious things he could say he has to get it. Depression, anxiety, etc. I wonder why he would choose PTSD?
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  5. #20
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    1) Make absolutely certain that whoever provided the diagnosis is: a) a licensed clinical psychologist with a Psych D., or equivalent degree and qualified to diagnose and treat anxiety disorders; or, b) a psychiatrist, an M.D. or D.O. degree with advanced training in psychiatry. Preferably, both working together should reach a joint diagnosis.

    2) Get son to a qualified individual if he is not already seeing one. Again, an MD psychiatrist; a Psych D. licensed clinical psychologist.

    3) Anxiety disorders including PTSD are treatable with both medicines and appropriate therapy, but are not to be fooled with by pretend therapists. There are plenty of unqualified and marginally qualified practitioners out there-- and charlatans. Check credentials. Verify credentials and education. OR, see folks affiliated with a large multi-discipline medical clinic which is affiliated with a medical school.

    4) Other anxiety disorders may appear similar to PTSD, being PTSD like in clinical presentation.

    5) Don't take it personally. Illness is illness. No one asks for it and you didn't cause it. There are plenty of folks who survive severe trauma without developing PTSD, and there are folks who develop it after relatively minor trauma. It is illness in either case.

    6) Will you have to take care of him. Legally, NO.

    As a parent who cares about your child you may well WANT to take care of him. Being a parent is a life sentence, and anyone who thinks they can kick their kids out the door at 18 and wash their hands of them is living in a fantasy world or being cruel. Or, perhaps has life circumstances have made the push out the door unavoidable.

    Most parents want to retain life long good relationships with their children and nurture them however they can till the day that the parent passes on, hopefully before the child.

    Would you abandon your kid if he came home with a broken back and hip because he made a bad choice to go mountain climbing, did it against your advice, and now is broken? If the answer is NO, then why would you abandon your kid because (not saying it happened) the kid smoked some pot.

    Drinking, smoking pot, taking other medicines illegally or taking illegal street drugs are all SYMPTOMS of emotional illness which has gone untreated and for which the individual is self-medicating. I hardly see where it would be humane to be worried about "taking care of a sick child (even if he is 40), unless you simply lack the financial, physical or emotional resources to do it.

  6. #21
    Member Array ScubaDuba's Avatar
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    Adjustment Disorder is often misdiagnosed as PTSD by practitioners with no CISD/Military/Disaster experience.
    Healthy children will not fear life, if their parents have integrity enough not to fear death.
    -TIME DEUM ET OPERARE IUSTITIAM--

  7. #22
    VIP Member Array rottkeeper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    1) Make absolutely certain that whoever provided the diagnosis is: a) a licensed clinical psychologist with a Psych D., or equivalent degree and qualified to diagnose and treat anxiety disorders; or, b) a psychiatrist, an M.D. or D.O. degree with advanced training in psychiatry. Preferably, both working together should reach a joint diagnosis.

    2) Get son to a qualified individual if he is not already seeing one. Again, an MD psychiatrist; a Psych D. licensed clinical psychologist.

    3) Anxiety disorders including PTSD are treatable with both medicines and appropriate therapy, but are not to be fooled with by pretend therapists. There are plenty of unqualified and marginally qualified practitioners out there-- and charlatans. Check credentials. Verify credentials and education. OR, see folks affiliated with a large multi-discipline medical clinic which is affiliated with a medical school.

    4) Other anxiety disorders may appear similar to PTSD, being PTSD like in clinical presentation.

    5) Don't take it personally. Illness is illness. No one asks for it and you didn't cause it. There are plenty of folks who survive severe trauma without developing PTSD, and there are folks who develop it after relatively minor trauma. It is illness in either case.

    6) Will you have to take care of him. Legally, NO.

    As a parent who cares about your child you may well WANT to take care of him. Being a parent is a life sentence, and anyone who thinks they can kick their kids out the door at 18 and wash their hands of them is living in a fantasy world or being cruel. Or, perhaps has life circumstances have made the push out the door unavoidable.

    Most parents want to retain life long good relationships with their children and nurture them however they can till the day that the parent passes on, hopefully before the child.

    Would you abandon your kid if he came home with a broken back and hip because he made a bad choice to go mountain climbing, did it against your advice, and now is broken? If the answer is NO, then why would you abandon your kid because (not saying it happened) the kid smoked some pot.

    Drinking, smoking pot, taking other medicines illegally or taking illegal street drugs are all SYMPTOMS of emotional illness which has gone untreated and for which the individual is self-medicating. I hardly see where it would be humane to be worried about "taking care of a sick child (even if he is 40), unless you simply lack the financial, physical or emotional resources to do it.
    I was going to highlight a few things in the above post but decided there was no need as it is all very good advice.

    Any drug and alcohol use may be a sign of SELF medicating.
    For as the lightning comes from the east and flashes to the west, so also will the coming of the son of man be. Mathew 24:27

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  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    I'd kick his ass and actually give him some PTSD.
    Love the way you think.... I agree
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  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    I'd kick his ass and actually give him some PTSD.
    Is there one of us here that doesn't love the way SIXTO thinks?
    Disclaimer: The posts made by this member are only the members opinion, not a reflection on anyone else, nor the group, and should not be cause for anyone to get their undergarments wedged in an uncomfortable position.

  10. #25
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    PTSD is defined as
    A common anxiety disorder that develops after exposure to a terrifying event or ordeal in which grave physical harm occurred or was threatened.
    IF your son has had such and experience, then by all means his immediate family will be instrumental in his recovery. If he has not and the "counselor" is merely suggesting that he has, then check the credentials and get a second opinion from a credible professional with good references.
    God is love (1 John 4:8)

  11. #26
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    I feel for you. My brother is kind of the same way. My Mother has spent a lot of her savings on him of course he is self destructive. When things are going good for him he does stupid things. In 2001 he was involved in an auto accident whie drinking that almost killed him and in 2008 he fell three stories of a balcony (while Drinking) and crushed his face. Just recently he graduated from college and got his second DUI. My Step father and I believe that he has a chemical inbalance. I second the advice as to seeking professional help with someone who is trained and licensed to make the proper diagnoses and get him help. As far as you and your wife taking care of him that is not your job. As a father I feel that it is the duty of a parent to raise the children right and guide them to becoming a man or women and then let them leave the nest and fly, always being there to offer guidance and be there when they fall to pick them up and set them down the right path. My prayers go out to you and your family.

  12. #27
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    Sounds like a way to justify an income stream, to me.
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  13. #28
    Distinguished Member Array Bunny's Avatar
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    Um...sorry, isn't marijuana a depressant? Doesn't seem like it would be so great for PTSD.

    I could say a LOT here about PTSD, and when it's time to decide that you're either a victim, or a volunteer, STFU and get on with it, and stop blaming everyone and everything around you so that you don't have to grow up and actually be responsible for your own self...

    Unless there's an issue of extreme what, nausea or physical pain, I think? Then there doesn't seem to be a good reason to smoke pot, other than just being a loadie.
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  14. #29
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    Post The Latest On PADB

    Movie goers experiencing extreme depression and some even contemplating suicide after seeing the movie AVATAR.

    PADB Post Avatar Depression Blues.

    Avatar may be one of the biggest grossing movies of all time, but it’s got a lot of fans feeling super blue (pun wholly intended).

    CNN just came out with an extremely detailed report on the intense depression that Avatar is causing among a certain segment of fans, fans who psychotherapist Stacy Kaiser describes as “lonely to begin with. They’re seeing Avatar, they’re lonely people, a lot of them don’t have a lot going on in their lives right now… The movie opened up a portal for them to express their depression.”

    These fans are turning to online forums — some of which have thousands of posts on how to deal with the cinema-induced sadness — to express their distress. Here’s a few excerpts from the CNN report:

    “Ever since I went to see ‘Avatar’ I have been depressed. Watching the wonderful world of Pandora and all the Na’vi made me want to be one of them. I can’t stop thinking about all the things that happened in the film and all of the tears and shivers I got from it.. I even contemplate suicide thinking that if I do it I will be rebirthed in a world similar to Pandora and the everything is the same as in ‘Avatar.’ ”
    - Mike


    “When I woke up this morning after watching Avatar for the first time yesterday, the world seemed … gray. It was like my whole life, everything I’ve done and worked for, lost its meaning…It just seems so … meaningless. I still don’t really see any reason to keep … doing things at all. I live in a dying world.”
    - Ivar Hill, 17, Sweden

    In short, people are depressed because their own lives don’t measure up to the fantasy, a phenomenon Kaiser likens to the ennui one feels after seeing a romance movie if one happens to be unattached and dissatisfied.

    CNN goes on to examine how the 3D technology only served to deepen the depression, as the realistic landscape of the film seems almost within reach, even though it doesn’t actually exist.

    Well, if that’s the case, entertainment buffs better start popping the Prozacs as mainstream TV stations go 3D, and holograms are incorporated into standard award show fare.

  15. #30
    Member Array Leopard125's Avatar
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    Thanks guys,
    Look I really am not looking for professional advise online, I just need a place to bounce a few ideas around and I knew that I might get some good responce from the members here. and really wondered if I would find someone that has PTSD from a truly tramatic event.
    Mom and I really want to help the boy get his life in order(but at the same time not get milked)so he can start enjoying Gods wonderful creations.
    Thanks again.

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