Bug out Bags and Prepping and General Preparedness

Bug out Bags and Prepping and General Preparedness

This is a discussion on Bug out Bags and Prepping and General Preparedness within the Bushcraft - Primitive Skills - Survival Skills - Camping forums, part of the Related Topics category; I have seen some recent threads with people asking questions about what they should have in their bug-out bag or what things they should stock ...

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    Bug out Bags and Prepping and General Preparedness

    I have seen some recent threads with people asking questions about what they should have in their bug-out bag or what things they should stock up on for their home etc... Most people do this without putting the required thought into it.

    * First a lot of hunters and other pseudo-outdoorsmen are planning to go out to the local National Forest and live off the land.

    One ) Local game would run out quickly, everyday would be like the last day of hunting season (i.e. usually the worst day to hunt).

    Two ) Most people do not know what wild plants are safe to eat.

    Three ) Camping out is nice for a weekend but try it for a month, most common camping gear would fall apart under serious constant use.

    Four ) There would be a lot of seriously hungry people in the woods with you in short order. Traditional hunter gathers have spent their entire lives learning how to live off the land, they have the stored knowledge of generations to build own and they have “cultivated” wild patches of food. They also have a large area of land to support them. The common modern American hunter has none of these advantages and will not survive as long unless they also happen to be an Eagle Scout. And even a 1940’s era Eagle Scout would be hard pressed to survive off the land for an indefinite period of time.

    * Second a lot of people have the plan to flee to their lake cabin or other remote vacation property and start to farm the land. Well most have problems keeping their Petunia’s alive without a lot of fertilizer and pesticides, they have no farming equipment at their summer cottage, and they have no seed stock or knowledge to start off with. Also most cottages are just modern houses in remote locations and are just as dependent on electricity etc…

    * Third, people have bought some Wise Foods or MRE’s and throw them in a closet and think that they are prepared. They have no means to obtain fresh water, heat or cook their food. They might have a fire place but no serious supply of wood handy or a means to obtain some (they don’t even have a bow saw or axe).

    Of these three groups the third group is the best prepared for most contingencies in my opinion. The chance of a wide spread chemical or nuclear attack is very low, but a hurricane, tornado or other natural disaster is probably much higher. A terrorist attack using a dirty bomb or chemical attacks will probably be very local in area. I advocate to being prepared to live without power, water or outside support for at least 7 days, I highly recommend a longer period of time, but 7 days is a minimum.
    You have to think about keeping warm, food, water, security, personal hygiene, medicine etc… If you live in a coastal area and have to evacuate due to hurricanes then you either have to be able to bring these with you or go to a place where they are already in place. If you don’t have these basics you need them before you need a hazmat suit and gas mask.

    For food storage I recommend storing what you eat and eating what you store. My family eats a lot of dry goods, beans, rice, flour, canned vegetables etc… When we first started to build up a surplus we simply bought a little extra each shopping trip, wrote the dates on them and place them in the pantry. This allowed us too slowly and affordably to build up our stores. We use the oldest items first and replace them when they are used. You have to have a method to keep records, and for us it is a dry erase board hanging on the pantry door. I recommend the Crisis Preparedness Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide to Home Storage and Physical Survival by Jack A. Spigarelli. He offers a good highly modifiable plan. If you have the space for it start an organic vegetable garden. Even if you just grow tomatoes and a few herbs you will gain skills and some minimum tools and you have the potential to scale up if the time requires.

    I suggest that your first option should be to shelter in place, and only bug-out when you absolutely have too. This is the easiest way to plan even if you live in a large city. You can have a better plan for defense and set up rain barrels, build a solar oven, and do a lot of other things that are not very portable. I suggest having a Bug-out bag in each vehicle, mainly to get you home from your daily travels, I have a thread about what I have in mine.

    Once you have your stores and bug-out bags, test them. Take your bug-out bag camping and learn what you are missing (I forgot to include toilet paper). Take a long weekend and don’t turn on any power or water and see how well you do. Try them in different seasons, see what you need to include for cold weather, etc…

    Once you cover the basics then you can worry about NBC attacks, Carrington events, EMP’s and the other stuff.
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    Interesting post for this forum. I spent 4 years as a Navy survival instructor and I would rate myself highly profficient in wilderness/primative survival. Wandering into the woods for an accomplished outdoorsmen would be very hard. Doing so with a few extra mouths to feed makes it a very dangerous idea.

    I also believe this new trend in survival and end of the world stuff is mostly pretty far fetched. Time and time again mother nature demonstrates she is the most consistent threat to a persons day to day life.

    Either way- if it is a minor weather event, or a total collapse of the modern world I am buckling down at my place, with my family until things blow over or I am forced out into another position.

    The primary concern I have is ample water for my family- of which I believe I have enough for 60 moderately comfortable days without ever opening the front door. Water is cheap and fairly easy to store and preserve. I do have a few months worth of Wise and Mountain House foods. Only because feeding 4 off the land is an impossible challenge if unprepared.

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    Do you think this could be made into a Sticky Thread? I'm sure others will join later and ask the same?! (great info btw)
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    Over the past few days Ive watched a few videos on how to dress and cook wild game with more primative methods. I have the weapons, and it would be easy to shoot an animal such as a rabit or turkey, but at this point, Ive got no experience in what to do with them afterwards.

    Another thing Im going to start learning about is farming. I highly ever doubt Id ever need a skill like that, since I dont see an "end of the world" scenario happening, but I do find it interesting.

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    One thing to add; everyone that thinks storing up battle rifle ammo and fending off the hungry hoards with just their little family is crazy.
    For starters, if you are holed up in your house, they will just burn you out and then do what they want.
    If you are bugging out in the wilderness, they will attack in large groups and kill you anyway.

    Without a support partnership, your chances are cut in half in each scenario.

    Now, concerning the weaponry. The OP is correct. What are you gonna do with those big game guns when the big or medium game is gone?

    The 22 rimfire is the most useful, desirable, and effective gun to have. You will be foraging, leading a subsistent life when your stored provisions are gone. This means birds of every feather, rodents, and reptiles become your food.
    Try your luck on those with the 30-06, or even AR15. If the issues that would come up aren't obvious, you aren't prepared to do anything.
    The 22 rimfire can also be used quite effectively for SD. Remember, if you have to leave your home, that means the stand and fight didn't work for ya. And you won't fair any better engaging in a fire fight in the wilderness.

    I believe a bolt action 22 with IRON sights and a quality fixed power 4 x scope is the choice.
    If you have to fire a shot at someone, you have already screwed up.

    Your key to survival is swift, silent, and deadly.

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    Glockman is right, you cannot survive on your own, you need a community and social structure.

    Someone could easily pick me off as I am gathering eggs of picking blueberries on my farm. The best thing to do is to get to know your neighbors and get them to prepare too, even if they are just slightly prepared it will be better than nothing.

    In my small town we have made a Resiliency group that started as a mutual aid society at our church. Were we agreed to help each other, share tools and skills (trading labor, books etc... with each other) at no charge. Now each family has agreed to have at least 21 days of food stored. The thinking was that if someone lost a job the could eat for three weeks without going to the grocery store or food bank, and then each family could easily give a weeks worth of food to whoever needed it.

    Look into starting something similar, then you might not have to fight off the hordes of cannibal bikers by yourself.

    Also the lowly .22lr has probably put more pounds of meat on the table than all other rifle rounds combined
    OD*, miller_man, Arejay and 3 others like this.
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    I've read some "survivalist novels."

    There are a few fictional (but plausible) ways to look at long term survivability.

    You can go it alone... The Road
    You can partner/gang up and bug outPatriots: A Novel of Survival in the Coming Collapse
    You can create community, and shelter in place One Second After

    If you've read these, you can get an inkling what it might be like... In a national/worldwide "event."

    Go back and read them again...

    The Road... pretty dark for those who survived... guy only has two bullets left ~10 years after the fall. That's surviving? How much preps did he have to make it TEN years and still have a couple of bullets left?

    Patriots... Had years to prep a group of like minded people... lots of survival stuff sent to a hidey hole where one (couple) of the team lived, by all the partners. The only other survivalist "group" was started by someone "independently wealthy" (and his group got killed).

    One Second After... this is how it will likely be. for most everyone... in small urban groups in a large city (I don't like the odds of any one group in the metropolises getting through it alive, too much competition, small space). Small rural communities, if they band together, might have a shot...

    None of it pretty... some of it possible... maybe even some of it likely... There are parts from each of the novels worthy of consideration...

    2000 calories a day
    1-2 liters of water a day... per person. (Gov't says 1 gallon) 7 & 1/2 50 gallon drums of potable water per person per year. How long will your filter last, how many tablets you got...

    How long can you eat MREs? How many deer you gonna kill? How many tons of salt you got to keep salted meat? your freezer might not work.

    think about it...
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    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    One thing to add; everyone that thinks storing up battle rifle ammo and fending off the hungry hoards with just their little family is crazy.
    For starters, if you are holed up in your house, they will just burn you out and then do what they want.
    If you are bugging out in the wilderness, they will attack in large groups and kill you anyway.

    Without a support partnership, your chances are cut in half in each scenario.

    Now, concerning the weaponry. The OP is correct. What are you gonna do with those big game guns when the big or medium game is gone?

    The 22 rimfire is the most useful, desirable, and effective gun to have. You will be foraging, leading a subsistent life when your stored provisions are gone. This means birds of every feather, rodents, and reptiles become your food.
    Try your luck on those with the 30-06, or even AR15. If the issues that would come up aren't obvious, you aren't prepared to do anything.
    The 22 rimfire can also be used quite effectively for SD. Remember, if you have to leave your home, that means the stand and fight didn't work for ya. And you won't fair any better engaging in a fire fight in the wilderness.

    I believe a bolt action 22 with IRON sights and a quality fixed power 4 x scope is the choice.
    If you have to fire a shot at someone, you have already screwed up.

    Your key to survival is swift, silent, and deadly.
    One should also add a good quality bb/pellet gun with scope to your hunting gear. 6000 copper BBs will cost you about $12.00. Save that precious .22LR for killing other things that a BB won't/can't kill.
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    Regards,
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    I still think a suppressed Ruger 10/22 would be ideal.
    "The pistol, learn it well, carry it always ..." ~ Jeff Cooper

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    I love these threads. I have been approached by a neighbor of mine not too long ago and we hit on some pretty basic stuff, but outside of my family and really close friends, it's a subject that isn't talked about much.

    I guess the subject doesn't get a chance to present itself very often going about one's every day business as usual. Although I'm not as prepared as I would hope to be for every situation, (never will be) it's a bit of a process and actually kind of fun in a way once you get the ball rolling and planning for likely scenarios in your particular area.

    And I'm sure that there are people out there who have felt it quite rewarding after a storm has left them without and in the dark for a stint but they had the mind to be ready. Sure is something that can pay off in the long run.
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    Well, if there's ever an event in which it all goes south overnight - no power, loss of social order, etc. - I'm pretty much screwed. I don't know what plants to eat, I live in a metro area that will be picked clean and turn into a die off zone in about 72 hours. And I'm not sure where I will "bug out" to.

    So, lacking the requisite self-reliance survival skills, I would just start my own gang of mauraders. Seems a lot easier.
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    I don't know what plants to eat,

    You can buy an illustrated identification book on edible plants for your area. They are usually very inexpensive.
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    Everyone always says "eat what you store, store what you eat" and that's fine if you eat the typical diet. I eat a more paleo style (though not paleo- Protein Power). Since much of my diet is fresh meat, that isn't really a great option for me. I'm not going to sacrifice my health for surviving a potential catastrophe that may, or may not, come. So, I store foods for this purpose, but it isn't rotated through. As it nears the end of its shelf life the food is donated to a food pantry or other charity and more food is purchased. It isn't ideal, but for those of us that don't eat much rice or beans or other shelf stable food it is an option.

    As far as actually surviving- in honesty luck is going to play a pretty big part of the equation. You'll have to avoid disease and infection that wouldn't be an issue to us. You will have to manage to not be targeted by a group with more firepower, manpower, or knowledge that wants to take your food away from you. If you're farming (and for some it is viable) you'll have to have weather that cooperates. In the end we can just do what we can do and hope for the best.
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by pgrass101 View Post
    For food storage I recommend storing what you eat and eating what you store. My family eats a lot of dry goods, beans, rice, flour, canned vegetables etc… When we first started to build up a surplus we simply bought a little extra each shopping trip, wrote the dates on them and place them in the pantry. This allowed us too slowly and affordably to build up our stores. We use the oldest items first and replace them when they are used. You have to have a method to keep records, and for us it is a dry erase board hanging on the pantry door. I recommend the Crisis Preparedness Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide to Home Storage and Physical Survival by Jack A. Spigarelli. He offers a good highly modifiable plan. If you have the space for it start an organic vegetable garden. Even if you just grow tomatoes and a few herbs you will gain skills and some minimum tools and you have the potential to scale up if the time requires.
    I would surmise PGrass has been doing this a very long time. His comment storing what you eat and eating what you store really struck a nerve. I've seen this word for word in books and on the net on other sites. I'd be willing to bet PGrass is a member on a prepper site somewhere else.

    Another great book to get you in the mind set is Carla Emery's Country Living Cookbook. I think that's the name of it.

    A great magazine preppers and regular folks who would hope to live and maintain a sustainable lifestyle is backwoodshomemagazine.com Located just out of Cottage Grove Oregon Dave Duffy is the owner/publisher of this fine publication. He has a great team of writers who contribute often. Folks like Jackie Clay, O. E. MacDougal, Massad Ayoob, John Silveira, Claire Wolfe and others. BWH has a vast collection of books on subjects like animal husbandry, off grid power, canning and preserving food, gardening, making a living, self reliance, bee keeping, small scale livestock farming, home based businesses and 13 volumes of the Foxfire Books.
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