8 Reasons Potatoes are the Survivial Superfood

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    VIP Member Array Patti's Avatar
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    8 Reasons Potatoes are the Survivial Superfood

    (I received this from a friend of mine, who is an avid prepper. I thought you guys might enjoy reading it, as it has a lot of information I was not aware of)

    If you could choose just one crop to grow to feed your family in tough times, the potato would be ideal. Potatoes may have a humble reputation, but when it comes to surviving in tough times, they're superstars. Here are eight reasons why.

    Reason #1: They're easy to grow and require no machinery or processing
    Potatoes are easy for one person to grow and harvest. Growing a family plot of potatoes requires minimal labor and attention. No heavy machinery needed! Unlike grain crops, potatoes don't need to be milled, threshed, combined, or undergo any other processing. You just pull them out of the earth, brush off the dirt, and cook them.

    Reason #2: Potatoes are packed with nutrition
    Potatoes get a bad rap, but they're actually an excellent source of important nutrients. A typical potato contains over half the day's requirement of vitamins C and B6, and almost half of the potassium. They're also a good source of fiber, folate, niacin, thiamin, magnesium, manganese, and more.

    Reason #3: Potatoes are a healthful alternative to grains and beans
    Many pre-packaged survival foods rely on grains and beans... but for some folks, that can be a problem. Potatoes are more easily digestible than beans, which often require soaking. For people with gluten sensitivities or who don't do well with grains, potatoes are the perfect alternative.

    Reason #4: In a TEOTWAWKI scenario, they provide sorely needed calories
    In a total meltdown, you will be doing far more manual labor than you do now. You'll be walking or biking everywhere when gasoline prices skyrocket. You'll be growing your own food. If power is down for extended periods, you won't have machines to do laundry, dishes, or cleaning. You'll be chopping wood for heat. And all that extra effort requires more calories. Home grown potatoes, which require minimal labor, can provide all the extra calories your family needs in a complete off-the-grid lifestyle.

    Reason #5: They can be grown even when growing space is limited
    It doesn't require much land at all to grow potatoes, but if you live somewhere where there's virtually no ground to till, you can still grow them. People grow potatoes in window boxes, food-grade buckets, cardboard boxes, tall homemade containers, and more.

    Reason #6: Potatoes keep for months
    Kept at the proper temperature in an old-fashioned root cellar, potatoes will last for months. (Keep them away from onions and garlic, however, or they'll spoil faster.) And if you're worried about using them up before they start to go bad, you have another option... see Reason #7.

    Reason #7: They're easy to dehydrate
    Scrub 'em, slice 'em, and dehydrate them ... either in a dehydrator or in your oven. Dehydrated, potatoes take up less space and can be stored in airtight containers for very long periods of time. In fact, they'll last for ten years in a sealed #10 can.

    Reason #8: Potatoes can be prepared in endless ways
    Boil 'em, mash 'em, cook 'em in a stew ... fry them, scallop them, even make potato flour from them for baked goods. Make potato pancakes, potato dumplings, home fries ... even potato vodka!

    If, like me, you can't help but think that the you-know-what is going to hit the fan any day now, then it's time to get prepared. This spring, why not try your hand at growing potatoes? And if you already do, why not try out a few new varieties?


    German Butterball, with its buttery yellow flesh, is an excellent all-purpose variety good for roasting, frying, and especially for mashed potatoes. This award-winning potato does well in long-term storage too.

    La Ratte is a top quality French variety highly sought after by chefs. If you're a "foodie," this potato is a must-have. Great for boiling, roasting, and frying, it has a smooth buttery texture and a delicious nutty flavor. Like potato salad? This is the potato you want, since it holds its shape well when cooked.

    Purple Viking makes a great all around, general purpose potato. Love mashed potatoes? Then you'll love the snowy white flesh and slightly sweet flavor of this potato. Delicious when harvested early too.

    Rose Finn Apple fingerlings hold their shape exceptionally well when cooked. They're perfect for potato salad, as well as steaming, frying, boiling, or roasting.

    Yukon Gold is the most widely grown specialty potato. It's a great all-around potato for baking, roasting, frying, mashing, or in salads. Plus, it matures early so you won't have to wait as long to harvest.

    All Blue is the best blue potato variety you'll find. With its outstanding flavor and moist texture, it's great for roasting, frying, and most fun of all, making colorful blue chips.

    Desiree Red skin and gold flesh with a moist creamy texture. It's an excellent choice for a general purpose potato.

    Bintje is, hands down, the best variety for French fries. It grows well in a wide range of soils and stores exceptionally well.

    Kennebec has long been a staple of gourmet restaurants and farmers markets, and is now catching on with home gardeners. Another excellent all-purpose potato that stores well.


    For generations before us, potatoes represented freedom in a way that growing corn or wheat did not. It truly took a village to bring in a crop of corn or wheat, since those crops are labor intensive and required tools and technologies that were beyond the economic reach of one household. A single sack of seed potatoes meant one thing: self-reliance. A man could feed his family and not worry about starving. The ability to be a completely self-reliant food producer was a hedge against oppression and tyranny.

    What's different today? Nothing. In fact, the self-reliance that the potato endows is more important than ever. And if you agree, then I urge you to plant potatoes in your garden this year.

    Planting time is just around the corner!
    Socialism is the philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance and the gospel of envy. Winston Churchill

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  3. #2
    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patti View Post
    (I received this from a friend of mine, who is an avid prepper. I thought you guys might enjoy reading it, as it has a lot of information I was not aware of)

    If you could choose just one crop to grow to feed your family in tough times, the potato would be ideal. Potatoes may have a humble reputation, but when it comes to surviving in tough times, they're superstars. Here are eight reasons why.

    Reason #1: They're easy to grow and require no machinery or processing
    Potatoes are easy for one person to grow and harvest. Growing a family plot of potatoes requires minimal labor and attention. No heavy machinery needed! Unlike grain crops, potatoes don't need to be milled, threshed, combined, or undergo any other processing. You just pull them out of the earth, brush off the dirt, and cook them.

    Reason #2: Potatoes are packed with nutrition
    Potatoes get a bad rap, but they're actually an excellent source of important nutrients. A typical potato contains over half the day's requirement of vitamins C and B6, and almost half of the potassium. They're also a good source of fiber, folate, niacin, thiamin, magnesium, manganese, and more.

    Reason #3: Potatoes are a healthful alternative to grains and beans
    Many pre-packaged survival foods rely on grains and beans... but for some folks, that can be a problem. Potatoes are more easily digestible than beans, which often require soaking. For people with gluten sensitivities or who don't do well with grains, potatoes are the perfect alternative.

    Reason #4: In a TEOTWAWKI scenario, they provide sorely needed calories
    In a total meltdown, you will be doing far more manual labor than you do now. You'll be walking or biking everywhere when gasoline prices skyrocket. You'll be growing your own food. If power is down for extended periods, you won't have machines to do laundry, dishes, or cleaning. You'll be chopping wood for heat. And all that extra effort requires more calories. Home grown potatoes, which require minimal labor, can provide all the extra calories your family needs in a complete off-the-grid lifestyle.

    Reason #5: They can be grown even when growing space is limited
    It doesn't require much land at all to grow potatoes, but if you live somewhere where there's virtually no ground to till, you can still grow them. People grow potatoes in window boxes, food-grade buckets, cardboard boxes, tall homemade containers, and more.

    Reason #6: Potatoes keep for months
    Kept at the proper temperature in an old-fashioned root cellar, potatoes will last for months. (Keep them away from onions and garlic, however, or they'll spoil faster.) And if you're worried about using them up before they start to go bad, you have another option... see Reason #7.

    Reason #7: They're easy to dehydrate
    Scrub 'em, slice 'em, and dehydrate them ... either in a dehydrator or in your oven. Dehydrated, potatoes take up less space and can be stored in airtight containers for very long periods of time. In fact, they'll last for ten years in a sealed #10 can.

    Reason #8: Potatoes can be prepared in endless ways
    Boil 'em, mash 'em, cook 'em in a stew ... fry them, scallop them, even make potato flour from them for baked goods. Make potato pancakes, potato dumplings, home fries ... even potato vodka!

    If, like me, you can't help but think that the you-know-what is going to hit the fan any day now, then it's time to get prepared. This spring, why not try your hand at growing potatoes? And if you already do, why not try out a few new varieties?


    German Butterball, with its buttery yellow flesh, is an excellent all-purpose variety good for roasting, frying, and especially for mashed potatoes. This award-winning potato does well in long-term storage too.

    La Ratte is a top quality French variety highly sought after by chefs. If you're a "foodie," this potato is a must-have. Great for boiling, roasting, and frying, it has a smooth buttery texture and a delicious nutty flavor. Like potato salad? This is the potato you want, since it holds its shape well when cooked.

    Purple Viking makes a great all around, general purpose potato. Love mashed potatoes? Then you'll love the snowy white flesh and slightly sweet flavor of this potato. Delicious when harvested early too.

    Rose Finn Apple fingerlings hold their shape exceptionally well when cooked. They're perfect for potato salad, as well as steaming, frying, boiling, or roasting.

    Yukon Gold is the most widely grown specialty potato. It's a great all-around potato for baking, roasting, frying, mashing, or in salads. Plus, it matures early so you won't have to wait as long to harvest.

    All Blue is the best blue potato variety you'll find. With its outstanding flavor and moist texture, it's great for roasting, frying, and most fun of all, making colorful blue chips.

    Desiree Red skin and gold flesh with a moist creamy texture. It's an excellent choice for a general purpose potato.

    Bintje is, hands down, the best variety for French fries. It grows well in a wide range of soils and stores exceptionally well.

    Kennebec has long been a staple of gourmet restaurants and farmers markets, and is now catching on with home gardeners. Another excellent all-purpose potato that stores well.


    For generations before us, potatoes represented freedom in a way that growing corn or wheat did not. It truly took a village to bring in a crop of corn or wheat, since those crops are labor intensive and required tools and technologies that were beyond the economic reach of one household. A single sack of seed potatoes meant one thing: self-reliance. A man could feed his family and not worry about starving. The ability to be a completely self-reliant food producer was a hedge against oppression and tyranny.

    What's different today? Nothing. In fact, the self-reliance that the potato endows is more important than ever. And if you agree, then I urge you to plant potatoes in your garden this year.

    Planting time is just around the corner!
    Great info & list...However, tell your friend to add a ninth reason.

    #9
    Because they grow UNDERGROUND. I dont mean in a bunker, I mean they are not above ground crops. This could mean the difference between survival, and starvation. No kidding.

    Im not sure of the exact time period, but I THINK maybe around the 100 years war, peasants had a real problem on their hands. Armies would ride through, and steal all the food they had. Of course all armies from the very first army that ever was did the same things.

    But this time (whichever time period it actually was), turned out differently for the peasants. Virtually everything that grew above ground would be stolen by troops. Fruit, veggies, you name it, but the potato itself was not visible while growing underground.

    But, generally speaking, potatoes were not. The historical explanation is fascinating, really. One reason is the obvious. Troops could see apples on the trees, or corn on the stalks, but not see through dirt to see the potatoes. But thats not the really interesting part, to me.

    One big rationale giving for everyones potato crops being ignored, was that troops didnt want to dig in dirt to get them. That it was "unwarriorlike", and also too much work for them to bother with.

    Peasants noted which crops were stolen, (Everything else), and which were left alone, (taters), and potatoes grew in popularity as something to make sure to plant.
    Patti, Aceoky and DingBat like this.

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    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
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    The only one I have to disagree with is #3, potatoes and beans serve difference dietary paths. Beans are a protein source that helps supplement the diet when meat sources are scarce, potatoes have very little protein.
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    VIP Member Array Patti's Avatar
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    I like that, StormRyder.

    Potatoes are hidden in plain sight.

    I always have a good crop of potatoes and sweet potatoes too.

    They store nicely down in the basement for a very long time. You can also dehydrate them or wet-can them. I just put them in a tub of sand.

    People need to remember that you can't use store-bought potatoes to use as seed potatoes. They won't produce - and I heard it will ruin your soil.

    Always buy your seed potatoes from a nursery or green house.
    StormRhydr and DingBat like this.
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    Ex Member Array Longstreet's Avatar
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    In addition to potatoes, and other garden crops, something that will be vital when the end comes is the ability and knowledge to can foods. This used to be something most people knew how to do, and had the jars/lids/seals to do, every year. These days? Show me the woman who lives near you who knows how to can. We have a very large garden and can many things each year. We could never get through all of it and give a lot of it away. When the day comes that there is no longer any retail grocery option, knowing how to put out a garden, bring it in, prep it, and then can it for long-term storage, is going to be vital. It's not rocket science but there is a knack to preparing, sealing, and then properly heating the jars before storage. This is lost skill that everyone should be learning again now.
    CWOUSCG, DingBat and JDE101 like this.

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    Member Array Arejay's Avatar
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    History also proves your point. I've read that after potatoes were introduced to Europe from the Americas the European famines were greatly reduced. France was one of the last to adopt the potato and they suffered. I've always wondered why snails are popular there. the Irish potato famine comes to mind also.

    edited:I did a Dan Quayle and spelled potato wrong
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    VIP Member Array Patti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OutWestSystems View Post
    The only one I have to disagree with is #3, potatoes and beans serve difference dietary paths. Beans are a protein source that helps supplement the diet when meat sources are scarce, potatoes have very little protein.
    I totally agree. And beans are stored very easily. I have TONS of different varieties of beans down in the basement. I went to the Family Food Storage Center, run by the LDS church. I've canned a lot of beans - probably about 500 pounds worth.

    Another good survival food is rice. It also has a long shelf life.

    And who doesn't like beans and rice?

    Quinoa is an ultimate survival food, that I plan on canning next.
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    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patti View Post
    I totally agree. And beans are stored very easily. I have TONS of different varieties of beans down in the basement. I went to the Family Food Storage Center, run by the LDS church. I've canned a lot of beans - probably about 500 pounds worth.

    Another good survival food is rice. It also has a long shelf life.

    And who doesn't like beans and rice?

    Quinoa is an ultimate survival food, that I plan on canning next.
    Potato flakes are also a good survival food. You can use it in many places where you would use flour, has good nutritional value and stores for a long long time.
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    VIP Member Array Patti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longstreet View Post
    In addition to potatoes, and other garden crops, something that will be vital when the end comes is the ability and knowledge to can foods. This used to be something most people knew how to do, and had the jars/lids/seals to do, every year. These days? Show me the woman who lives near you who knows how to can. We have a very large garden and can many things each year. We could never get through all of it and give a lot of it away. When the day comes that there is no longer any retail grocery option, knowing how to put out a garden, bring it in, prep it, and then can it for long-term storage, is going to be vital. It's not rocket science but there is a knack to preparing, sealing, and then properly heating the jars before storage. This is lost skill that everyone should be learning again now.
    I couldn't have said it better myself.

    Canning is a lost art.

    Better to learn now. There is a learning curve - When it's a matter of survival, it's not a good time to be learning and experimenting.
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    VIP Member Array Patti's Avatar
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    I keep an inventory list of my food storage:

    Oats, rice, wheat, beans, TVP, spices, dehydrated potatoes, powdered butter, powdered tomato, powdered peanut butter, dehydrated eggs, etc.

    I bought heavy duty shelves for my sub-basement, which is completely underground. Everything is organized nicely.

    I have 60,000 non-hybrid seeds.

    I have enough food in my basement for three people to survive for two years.

    I'm about as ready as anyone could possibly be.
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    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patti View Post
    I keep an inventory list of my food storage:

    Oats, rice, wheat, beans, TVP, spices, dehydrated potatoes, powdered butter, powdered tomato, powdered peanut butter, dehydrated eggs, etc.

    I bought heavy duty shelves for my sub-basement, which is completely underground. Everything is organized nicely.

    I have 60,000 non-hybrid seeds.

    I have enough food in my basement for three people to survive for two years.

    I'm about as ready as anyone could possibly be.
    The only thing you haven't done is given me your address

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    Distinguished Member Array 5lima30ret's Avatar
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    Another thing about potatoes that is great is that if you grow them in barrels like I do they are VERY easy to care for and take up little space and virtually no weeding! Once their done in late August I just dump the barrels onto a tarp and pick them up. That is much better than the conventional way we used to hill them up and them dig up with a spade or plow (lots of back breaking work). Good luck!
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    Senior Member Array CWOUSCG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longstreet View Post
    In addition to potatoes, and other garden crops, something that will be vital when the end comes is the ability and knowledge to can foods. This used to be something most people knew how to do, and had the jars/lids/seals to do, every year. These days? Show me the woman who lives near you who knows how to can. We have a very large garden and can many things each year. We could never get through all of it and give a lot of it away. When the day comes that there is no longer any retail grocery option, knowing how to put out a garden, bring it in, prep it, and then can it for long-term storage, is going to be vital. It's not rocket science but there is a knack to preparing, sealing, and then properly heating the jars before storage. This is lost skill that everyone should be learning again now.
    Eat what you can and what you can't you can. Learned that ditty when I was a kid.
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    VIP Member Array Patti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5lima30ret View Post
    Another thing about potatoes that is great is that if you grow them in barrels like I do they are VERY easy to care for and take up little space and virtually no weeding! Once their done in late August I just dump the barrels onto a tarp and pick them up. That is much better than the conventional way we used to hill them up and them dig up with a spade or plow (lots of back breaking work). Good luck!
    Don't use metal barrels or black containers because they heat the soil.

    Container Gardening the Rancher's Daughter Grows Potatoes in a Barrel | The Rancher's Daughter
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    VIP Member Array Patti's Avatar
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    If you don't have a very big yard, edible landscaping can be tricky and fun.

    Edible Landscaping: Organic Gardening And Landscape Design
    Socialism is the philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance and the gospel of envy. Winston Churchill

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