Shelter Building - Taking Down Smallish Tree w/ A Mora

Shelter Building - Taking Down Smallish Tree w/ A Mora

This is a discussion on Shelter Building - Taking Down Smallish Tree w/ A Mora within the Bushcraft - Primitive Skills - Survival Skills - Camping forums, part of the Related Topics category; This is useful if you are in an area where there is not much dead fall laying around or you need some live strong build ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
Like Tree32Likes

Thread: Shelter Building - Taking Down Smallish Tree w/ A Mora

  1. #1
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,577

    Post Shelter Building - Taking Down Smallish Tree w/ A Mora

    This is useful if you are in an area where there is not much dead fall laying around or you need some live strong build material.

    Method #1 - Will work with stock 1 1/2" ~ 2" Diameter AKA If you can bend the tree then it is possible to use the structure of the wood grain to your decided advantage. Your knife MUST be very sharp. He is demonstrating #1 with a stout branch but, it works well with standing live trees of "like" diameter also.

    #2 Actually it would be possible to break a Mora using the second batoning method in this Video. AKA it could happen but, maybe not.
    But, I have done it multiple times with a Busse.
    But, any smaller proved tough and sharp knife will work fine as long as you have a knife with you that can handle being heavily batoned.
    It is possible to make short work of small diameter trees if you do not have a saw, or a hand AX/hatchet or a large knife/machete.

    It is very labor and time intensive to pretend that a small knife is a hatchet/AX substitute. Own a knife tough enough to take a decent beating.

    Again not my Video but, I can usually search YouTube for anything and find somebody already doing near bout anything.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ


  2. #2
    VIP Member
    Array welder516's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    The Crab State if i could leave i would
    Posts
    3,589
    Wow , after that last cut you would have to get a new knife .
    QKShooter likes this.
    Member of the NRA
    {A}RMS discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property...Horrid mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them
    1775 Thomas Paine
    Not afraid to live & Not afraid to die .

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array GhostMaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,959
    It is very labor and time intensive to pretend that a small knife is a hatchet/AX substitute. Own a knife tough enough to take a decent beating.
    Funny you should mention this, as I was recently at my LGS and found an ESEE 5 sitting in one of the display cases. Until seeing the ESEE 5 I had been a collector of the Becker line from KA-BAR. After handling the ESEE for a little while I was able to work out a deal and take it home. A few days later I found an Izula II from ESEE for $40 bucks, plus the cost of the kit. I'm really becoming impressed with them both. Below are some examples of the ESEE 5 and the Izula II. I don't have the camera today as to the fact that the "Lady of the Manor" had to take it to work this morning. The ESEE 5 came in the Venom Green finish which I really find pleasing to the eye. The Izula II only came in black, which is fine, I am no slave to fashion an coordinating stuff.

    ESEE-5 in Venom Green.jpg

    esee-izula-ii-kit-survival-canvas-handle-black-sheath.jpg
    5lima30ret, QKShooter and Aceoky like this.
    U.S. Army Desert Storm Veteran
    Certified Police Firearms Instructor
    Former US Customs Blue Lighting Strike Force Commissioned Officer
    Advanced Highway Drug Interdiction Specialist
    Graduate Regional Counter Drug Training Academy
    Graduate of Bullet Proof Mind Course - (Dave Grossman Course)

  4. #4
    Sponsor
    Array AzQkr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    In the Superstitions
    Posts
    4,237
    Thanks for the vid QK
    QKShooter likes this.
    The mind is the limiting factor

    Quick Kill Rifle and Pistol Instructor

  5. #5
    Member Array rwponline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    210
    I've owned hundreds of knives, and for the size/weight/cost it is really tough to beat the Mora. The 840MG shown in the video typically sells for under $15. The carbon steel blades can take a scary sharp edge, and the scandi grind carves beautifully.

    Having said that, these knives are in a Scandinavian pattern (thin blade, stick tang) that for woodcraft/bushcrafting is really designed to be used in conjunction with a hatchet or axe. I can imagine very few instances where quickly cutting a limb would be worth bending/breaking a knife and possibly being injured in the process (especially in a survival situation).

    But thanks for the video, very interesting.
    QKShooter likes this.

  6. #6
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,577
    Well, really if the intention is to baton a knife into a tree then a decent quality solid tang knife is the one to opt for.
    You could baton that ESEE 5 into trees all day long without any problem.

    I don't think the MORA is a solid tang knife but, it should be good/informative to know that if you absolutely had to then chances are you could get away with it.
    You are correct in that if it was the only knife that you had in a true survival scenario you might want to baton it a bit easier than really wailing on it.

    There are some instances where you might really need to baton a knife into small, live standing trees.
    EXAMPLE: A person in camp or a family member is injured and you needed to bushcraft fabricate a stretcher in order to quickly get medical attention.

    That would be a time when you would not be wanting to fell small trees (actually more like stout or large saplings) in a slower and more meticulous manner.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Also with regard to coated blades I usually strip the coating off of any of my knives that may be used for food preparation. I think that once the coating gets really scratched up the scratches (which are often quite deep) tend to provide a place for nasty microscopic things to reside. Regular furniture type paint and varnish strippers will usually remove knife coatings.
    Some folks strip the entire knife but, I only ever strip the blades.
    I have had some folks tell me that I am being overly cautious it's possible to pick up E. Coli or a couple of other bugs when you have other more pressing things on your mind aside from sanitizing a knife blade when out in the woods. This is especially true when you may be processing an animal with the same knife that you are prepping meals with.
    Just something to consider.

  7. #7
    VIP Member
    Array TX expat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    3,849
    If necessary I could take down tree limbs with my Glock... However I think it's still probably best to use the correct tool for the job instead of an improvised one; one method illustrates preparedness and forethought, the other method just illustrates a lack of both.

    I've got some ESEE and Mora knives and one thing I will say about both of them is that they are definitely worth their price.
    NRA Life Member

    "I don't believe gun owners have rights." - Sarah Brady

  8. #8
    Sponsor
    Array AzQkr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    In the Superstitions
    Posts
    4,237
    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    Well, really if the intention is to baton a knife into a tree then a decent quality solid tang knife is the one to opt for.
    You could baton that ESEE 5 into trees all day long without any problem.

    I don't think the MORA is a solid tang knife but, it should be good/informative to know that if you absolutely had to then chances are you could get away with it.
    You are correct in that if it was the only knife that you had in a true survival scenario you might want to baton it a bit easier than really wailing on it.

    There are some instances where you might really need to baton a knife into small, live standing trees.
    EXAMPLE: A person in camp or a family member is injured and you needed to bushcraft fabricate a stretcher in order to quickly get medical attention.

    That would be a time when you would not be wanting to fell small trees (actually more like stout or large saplings) in a slower and more meticulous manner.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Also with regard to coated blades I usually strip the coating off of any of my knives that may be used for food preparation. I think that once the coating gets really scratched up the scratches (which are often quite deep) tend to provide a place for nasty microscopic things to reside. Regular furniture type paint and varnish strippers will usually remove knife coatings.
    Some folks strip the entire knife but, I only ever strip the blades.
    I have had some folks tell me that I am being overly cautious it's possible to pick up E. Coli or a couple of other bugs when you have other more pressing things on your mind aside from sanitizing a knife blade when out in the woods. This is especially true when you may be processing an animal with the same knife that you are prepping meals with.
    Just something to consider.
    I never wear one straight knife, but at least two, particularly if I'm going to be in wilderness [ described as over an hour from emergency medical response ].
    QKShooter likes this.
    The mind is the limiting factor

    Quick Kill Rifle and Pistol Instructor

  9. #9
    Member Array rwponline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    210
    Quote Originally Posted by TX expat View Post
    If necessary I could take down tree limbs with my Glock... However I think it's still probably best to use the correct tool for the job instead of an improvised one; one method illustrates preparedness and forethought, the other method just illustrates a lack of both.
    Well said.

    Telling the wife I'm going to "take down some tree limbs" when I want sneak off and go shooting definitely illustrates preparedness and forethought.
    QKShooter and TX expat like this.

  10. #10
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,515
    I've used my ESEE 5 to cut numerous branches that are at "hat knocking off height" when I am brush cutting on my tractor. I usually hack at them like I am on a cavalry charge
    QKShooter and GhostMaker like this.
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  11. #11
    Senior Moderator
    Array HotGuns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    14,964
    When talking survival and knives...

    a big knife is better than a little knife.
    pgrass101, rocky and QKShooter like this.
    I would rather stand against the cannons of the wicked than against the prayers of the righteous.


    AR. CHL Instr. 07/02 FFL
    Like custom guns and stuff? Check this out...
    http://bobbailey1959.wordpress.com/

  12. #12
    Distinguished Member
    Array Xader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,553
    One of my favorite knives for bushcraft that can baton really well is the Becker BK2.

    The only thing I didn't like about the BK2 was the plastic scales. Too smooth and slick. I threw a set of micarta scales on mine, and it's fantastic. Honestly though, I should have gone with an Ontario Ranger series. IMHO, just as good as the Becker, but comes with the micarta scales up front.

    Add a kydex sheath with a firesteel, and you've got a top-notch survival knife.

  13. #13
    Member Array rwponline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    210
    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    When talking survival and knives...

    a big knife is better than a little knife.
    Agreed, and I think that's where people go wrong with the Mora. Most Mora designs are utility/woodcraft knives designed for carving and cutting, not so called "survival" tasks like chopping/batoning/digging/etc... By the same token, I wouldn't want to spend the afternoon trying to carve with a 15 oz, 1/4" thick woods blade.

    Different tools for different tasks.
    QKShooter likes this.

  14. #14
    VIP Member
    Array TX expat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    3,849
    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    When talking survival and knives...

    a big knife is better than a little knife.
    But... But... I thought size didn't matter
    NRA Life Member

    "I don't believe gun owners have rights." - Sarah Brady

  15. #15
    Senior Moderator
    Array HotGuns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    14,964
    I thought size didn't matter
    That's a lie.
    TX expat likes this.
    I would rather stand against the cannons of the wicked than against the prayers of the righteous.


    AR. CHL Instr. 07/02 FFL
    Like custom guns and stuff? Check this out...
    http://bobbailey1959.wordpress.com/

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

mora bushcraft black remove paint strip

Click on a term to search for related topics.