Truly Ready?

Truly Ready?

This is a discussion on Truly Ready? within the Bushcraft - Primitive Skills - Survival Skills - Camping forums, part of the Related Topics category; This is my first post in this sub forum. Today I decided to read many posts here; lots of advice..how to's etc...BUT..... I did not ...

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Thread: Truly Ready?

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array RightsEroding's Avatar
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    Truly Ready?

    This is my first post in this sub forum.

    Today I decided to read many posts here; lots of advice..how to's etc...BUT.....

    I did not find any posts regarding a true to life (Simulation) "in the event of" or "what if."

    Long before I found DCC forum, I like many began my PREP for the inevitable SHTF scenarios.

    Like many others, I made a list, I read, I re-did my list, made plans, I gathered what I THOUGHT I would need.

    As many preppers soon learn, just "the plan" as we progress thru it becomes complex depending on the scenario.
    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________

    What I wonder is how many have TRAINED and SIMULATED the "What if"?
    ..and I ain't talkin' camping out at the primitive campground with a abundance of water and sanitation.

    Two years ago in mid winter, I assembled my (stuff) in 2 hrs and left my home for 2 days!

    I proceeded under the assumption the roads were unsafe. I would have to travel my pre-planned escape route
    and then hide out and survive.

    What I learned can not be found in books. New questions came to light I would not have even considered before bugging out.

    Long story short and my 2 cents...If you have not tried surviving for a few days in the "what if" scenario, I submit you are in for a rude awakening.
    "When those who are governed do too little, those who govern can, and will, do too much." Ronald Reagan

    Do what you can; then do what you must


  2. #2
    Member Array Brookline's Avatar
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    What you have done will give you the best possible knowledge of what you will need in that situation. I don't know anyone who as actually done this.
    Experience is truly the best teacher.
    Good work!
    rockinglock32 likes this.

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member Array DingBat's Avatar
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    I grew up at 10k feet in the rocky mountains. We lived in an RV and trucked in water. used generators for power. from the time I was 8. I was 13 when my dad finally got a well and 16 when he brought power in. I've hunted elk and deer and rabbit as a food source. I spent two weeks backpacking from Estes Park, Co.---to Granby, and back. (google earth it if you wish) me and 3 friends fed ourselves squirrels with pellet rifles on that particular journey. and a skinny high mountain tree rat roasted over a fire is one gamey sucker(though we learned why SALT is a huge must...)

    I even tried the native American trick of sleeping in a gutted carcass...once, and only made it about 4 hours for the smell, and crampiness. and it was a big ole' bull elk, not a buffalo. but it does work... yeesh. ick.

    as far as I'm concerned, if you haven't spent at MINIMUM TWO CONSECUTIVE NIGHTS sleeping in a snow cave... well, I don't know true desert nor jungle, but the country I live in... I could load the family suburban and never return again...

    but when I camp these days it's in luxury. tracking a stuck and bleeding deer through a blizzard for miles and having to pack him out, in 2 trips, at night, is no longer my version of fun.

    Good thought though. especially for "city slickers". everybody says "i'll go to the woods/desert/mountains/whatever and hunt/fish/forage for food." oh yeah? you and the other 4.5 million people from the city you're all abandoning? if SHTF; survival won't be "My Side of the Mountain". it will be trapping rodents and stalking feral cats and dogs in the ruins of civilization. deer and elk and pure streams full of trout will be a forgotten memory. gun battles for the contents of the ALPO dog food warehouse. do you know how to live in a dirty hole in the ground? cold, with no fire to give you away? how to move every morning and stay in the shadows and avoid open areas and find a new "shelter" before sundown? do you know how to maintain the necessary parts of hygiene and sanitation while hiding in an abandonded building for weeks so you and whoever's with you doesn't fall sick? do you know how to run your rifle when you can't get batteries for your optics? can you quickly and effectively gut and process animals? from fish to birds to coyotes to deer? do you know how to make jerky or salted meats? (salted and de-hydrated foods really). can you build things? really? truly?

    wow, guess I got worked up there somehow. Sorry. great post.
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    Valuable lessons really can be learned by practice. Grab your kit and disappear for a few days (3 should do it) and you'll find things that you wish you had thought of before, and stuff that you really don't need to carry.

    Just do it!
    Aceoky likes this.
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  5. #5
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    My wife and I shut off the power to our house for one weekend a year just to test stuff out. We switch the seasons up, the first time was in early spring because we knew we would have problems. Now we can do it anytime.

    We have used our get home bag camping, bringing normal our camping gear to supplement us for the things that we need but left out due to oversight like toilet paper. I have been doing this long enough to realize that I need a few dry runs to sort everything out before I run one for real. If I didn't have small children I would just tough it out, but since I have others that depend on me I do not want them to suffer for my mistakes.
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

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  6. #6
    Distinguished Member Array RightsEroding's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DingBat View Post

    wow, guess I got worked up there somehow. Sorry. great post.
    Naaa..You didn't get worked up; you see the value in training and simulating.
    Just as we are passionate about surviving; we need to be equally passionate about rehearsing it!

    Just a few things I learned for any interested:
    I've been considering writing a book on this but will no doubt need a ghost writer as my skills in survival far outweigh my skills as a writer.

    1) WEIGHT! OMG I was carrying too much stuff! Eventually I got it down to 40 lbs which is perfect for me, my fitness level. Your mileage may vary. :)
    If one does not wish a full dress rehearsal as I did; simply load up some weight in your bag and start walking down some easy trails to start. Eye opening.
    I promise you, climate will alter how and what you carry.

    2) FOOTWEAR: One would think this is a no brainer. Hardly! I quickly learned my feet are far more valuable than ANYTHING I could carry in my bag.
    Walking around Disney World in our comfy athletic shoes for miles is NOT a test!

    I soon learned my hiking boots were great for a trail walk but hardly suitable for hours of moving thru rough uneven terrain. As the boots flex, absorb moisture from perspiration,
    lack of air on the feet etc...blisters will eventually form to the point of becoming painful or worse..infected.

    What I learned? Stop every few hrs, take off the footwear; dry the inside of the boot, massage the foot, change socks if damp (white socks as inners) check between toes for any signs of abrasion. Any signs of blisters or abrasion beginning to appear must be dealt with immediately!

    FIRE: Enemy or friend? I found fire is BOTH!

    To cook and provide warmth it is most obviously a friend.

    To maintain concealment in a hostile environment, it is a enemy.

    My winter excursion had temps hovering in the mid 20's by day and single digits at night.
    Although I was warm to a point of being able to survive; I was still cold!
    I built a fire; warmed myself for 30 mins; kept a sharp eye out for approaching danger.
    I extinguished the fire and moved about 1,000 yds from that position and observed for 2 hrs for any signs of curiosity seekers.


    Believe me; after two full days living like this; I do not desire for the SHTF scenario..it is NOT fun, but I was surviving.
    If the SHTF; let's hope it's in spring or summer.
    "When those who are governed do too little, those who govern can, and will, do too much." Ronald Reagan

    Do what you can; then do what you must

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RightsEroding View Post
    Two years ago in mid winter, I assembled my (stuff) in 2 hrs and left my home for 2 days!
    Good reminder. The simulated, role-play situations can be vital to testing out our preparations. Nobody's going to die in 2 days, but a 'stressed' exit can highlight, at minimum, whether the bug-out bag is complete, whether the vehicle/travel arrangements are ready and solid, whether our initial assumptions still hold true or fall embarrassingly flat.
    Caertaker likes this.
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    Senior Member Array Fizban's Avatar
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    in 2011 many entire counties were dark when numerous tornado's took out our largest power grid. In 11 days without power I got to see the nature of people who have no power, no cell phone service, no hot water, no fuel, no functioning gas stations, no open grocery stores, not a single open business, strained gov services and a gov imposed dusk-till-dawn curfew. I cooked my food on a stove made from cinder blocks in my backyard using felled tree limbs as fuel.. my bbq grill was stolen the 3rd night. I lived off my preps [i had to] and fought to stay awake late into the hot muggy night due to strangers roaming the streets while my windows remained open to allow air into my home. There was reported disorder, looting-theft and citizen self defense shootings, people violated curfew and many were arrested. Churches opened food banks and most groceries donated thawing goods to the first responders. 11 days may not be a long time to some but it was a test and I learned where a few of my failures existed. I am a Southern Man and routinely spends 2-3-4 days in the woods as recreation a few times a year but 11 days with nothing but my preps, was a strain and I have learned from it.

    Where I failed:

    I needed alot more batteries
    No way to recharge cell phone
    I needed more fuel for vehicles [ i ran out ]
    I needed a better way to receive news and infomation
    I needed help keeping watch at night.
    Didnt notice my gas grill being stolen - LOL


    Where I did well:

    Plenty of dry goods and water
    Had 3 bags of Ice on hand and a cooler
    Plenty of dog food for my Dobie
    Good long life LED lighting
    Ability to make fire and cook/clean
    Ability to Defend myself if necessary
    Ability to maintain good hygene
    Plenty of first-aid if needed
    Squeezed my Truck into the Shed at night to help protect the little gas
    I had from being stolen.

    What surprised me:

    The chaos at the groceries [ early on] food gone in hours
    Disorder/panic at the gas stations as people tried in vein to get gas without power
    The number of strangers roaming my rural street all hours of the night
    The fact that someone ran off with my gas grill
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  9. #9
    VIP Member Array WrongRecroom's Avatar
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    Reminds me of a post on Cracked about rual living .. The authors parents were Preppers and some of his stories sound like this ...

    Yeah you have to think are you really ready ... And it is about where you live and living long enough to bug out ... Esp in mass fill urban zones ( NY/LA/boston etc)

    great post !
    “Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats.” H.L. Mencken
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    Distinguished Member Array SCXDm9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RightsEroding View Post

    Long before I found DCC forum, I like many began my PREP for the inevitable SHTF scenarios.
    .
    Define 'inevitable'? I enjoyed your post and agree with much of it and plan to try your suggestions for myself but really more as a hobby/self improvement sort of thing not because it think I'll ever really need to hid in the woods for a few weeks.
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  11. #11
    Senior Member Array DaGunny's Avatar
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    I think "inevitable" may actually be appropriate in SHTF preparations. Hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes, ice/snow storms, and all the other natural disasters count as SHTF. I'm not sure that anywhere in the US is immune. Add in that any major city is only one court decision away from civil unrest and you're purt-near at "inevitable".

    I agree that having to live off of the land for an extended period is highly unlikely, but it does not relieve us of the need to some kind of preparation for it. Based on where I live, I have made a risk assessment of possible scenarios and prepared accordingly from most likely (natural disaster) to least likely (zombie apocalypse).
    DingBat, Arejay and Aceoky like this.
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  12. #12
    Distinguished Member Array SCXDm9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaGunny View Post
    I think "inevitable" may actually be appropriate in SHTF preparations. Hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes, ice/snow storms, and all the other natural disasters count as SHTF. I'm not sure that anywhere in the US is immune. Add in that any major city is only one court decision away from civil unrest and you're purt-near at "inevitable".

    But we've had all those things forever and never have we had to venture into the woods to survive.
    fredg53 likes this.
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  13. #13
    VIP Member Array Patti's Avatar
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    Good post, OP.

    I've lived out of my backpack for up to 10 days in the mountains.

    It's not easy, but it can be done.
    Aceoky likes this.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member Array Fizban's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCXDm9 View Post
    Define 'inevitable'?
    I dont think its intended to be hyper literal like the sky is falling or something. I take it to mean that sooner or later you are likely going to need your first aid kit, your fire extinguisher, spare tire or road flare.
    1MoreGoodGuy, SCXDm9 and DingBat like this.
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  15. #15
    Senior Member Array CommonCents's Avatar
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    in a real SHTF, maybe a nuke or EMP etc...it wouldn't take more than a week or two for 90% to be wiped out, food/water gone, especially in urban areas. 30 days in a bug out place and you'll be golden.
    fredg53 and Patti like this.

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