Pros and Cons of "Bugging IN' and Bugging OUT

This is a discussion on Pros and Cons of "Bugging IN' and Bugging OUT within the Bushcraft - Primitive Skills - Survival Skills - Camping forums, part of the Related Topics category; As requested by another poster here new topic Bugging IN vs Bugging OUT EDIT TO ADD: (Sorry my bad) Let's say it's not some short ...

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Thread: Pros and Cons of "Bugging IN' and Bugging OUT

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Aceoky's Avatar
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    Pros and Cons of "Bugging IN' and Bugging OUT

    As requested by another poster here new topic Bugging IN vs Bugging OUT

    EDIT TO ADD:

    (Sorry my bad)

    Let's say it's not some short term "disaster" but maybe a worldwide currency collapse or similar- the "end" is not in sight - no clue when OR IF things will come back even close to normal anytime soon

    Thoughts?
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    In Gibson v. Commonwealth, 237 Ky. 33, 34 S.W.2d 936 (1936), the High Court stated:  [I]t is the tradition that a Kentuckian never runs.   He does not have to.

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    I most likely would have to stay put , just the way my family structure is and life situations . I have a lot of stuff to keep me going all the supplies and gear . If i travel out it would be hard to move and get about for long periods away from home maybe an hour in and there .
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    Senior Member Array Fizban's Avatar
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    People always seem to get all up in arms over the concept of bugging out but I will gladly share my thoughts on it.

    I considering bugging out in the same way I considering abandoning a sinking ship. No matter what I want to do.. planned or prepared to do, there may be circumstances where I am forced to flee. I may be faced with a circumstance where staying where I am [is] or will soon be much more perilous than going somewhere else.

    The question is- do I want to be prepared for that circumstance or not? A mobile element to my emergency kit is simply a part of the overall process of reasonable preparedness. I have no intention to flee my home and go run into the woods during a crisis or leap from a ship simply because there is a leak but I will concede that [at some point] I may have to. People get all caught up on where to go if you MUST bug out.. well, if you have a place to go- great! If you dont, you simply must make a decision based on your current circumstances and act.

    I dont worry about distance or direction, those things can change- I focus on duration and have settled on 72hrs of mobile kit which is the accepted universal minimum. Disasters are typically a very fluid event so its hard to really assign pros and cons to the decision to leave or stay. In my mind I will flee when I no longer have a reasonable option to remain. Its not much deeper than that to me- sometimes [movement is life] whether its shoot and move, move off the x or getting the heck out of dodge.
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    Distinguished Member Array 5lima30ret's Avatar
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    I'd say it depends on your geographic location and what the threat is (hurricane, tornado, ice storm, pandemic, etc). If you live in rural location and your home is sound and secure sheltering in place makes sense. If you live near the coast in a mobile home or apartment then bugging out makes sense. Pandemics often make sheltering in place a viable choice. Good luck!
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    Distinguished Member Array noway2's Avatar
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    I agree with Fizban. My intentions would be to stay put. To that end, I am working toward the goal of being well prepared and self sufficient to enable myself to survive short term disasters as well as long term post SHTF. However, it may be necessary to abandon a sinking ship in order to survive and having a plan and the resources to facilitate such a situation could make all the difference.
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    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    Not too many years ago there was a hurricane coming into TX. They ordered a big evacuation. And everyone listened (lots of people, anyway), and everyone jumped in their cars and promptly came to be stuck (for days), on the interstate.

    According to news reports, The State of TX sent gas tankers to issue 5 gallons of gas to each vehicle. There was at least one instance of someone holding a gun on the gas tanker people telling them to "fill er up".

    Lets all get real about this "bug out" thing. Unless you are first, or last in the line to get out, you are apt to be stuck in a situation worse than you left.

    Think about how long food & gas supplies would be available in a mass exodus. Or if the minimum wage employees at the gas stations and fast food places, would remain on the job, instead of seeing to their own families.

    Pretend you are "Mr. Prepared". You have way more than enough gas, supplies, and have a great vehicle to bug out in. You are out of luck if everyone else has run out of gas ahead of you, blocking the roads/interstates.

    I think the notion of mass "bug outs" are pretty much a fantasy. At least as far as such a bug out going well, and in an orderly fashion.

    And it could very well get much worse than folks waiting around for a gas truck.

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    VIP Member Array Aceoky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by welder516 View Post
    I most likely would have to stay put , just the way my family structure is and life situations . I have alot of stuff to keep me going all the supplies and gear . If i travel out it would be hard to move and get about for long periods away from home maybe an hour in and there .
    Which begs the question :

    Now let's say the "powers that be" - up and "decide" you have a surplus and others are starving and confiscate what you have stored? Then they say "you have to come with us to a camp where your needs will be taken care of " (Fema camp IOW)

    I think that Is a realistic happening under National Martial Law BTW
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    In Gibson v. Commonwealth, 237 Ky. 33, 34 S.W.2d 936 (1936), the High Court stated:  [I]t is the tradition that a Kentuckian never runs.   He does not have to.

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    VIP Member Array Aceoky's Avatar
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    All good points; especially IF you live in a section of the USA where you can easily get "bottle necked" for sure but how many know even 1/10 of the "backroads" we have in Ky, TN etc. etc. etc. - also what IF you don't wait until the "last minute" - paying attention to events "could" get you well ahead of the masses


    Quote Originally Posted by StormRhydr View Post
    Not too many years ago there was a hurricane coming into TX. They ordered a big evacuation. And everyone listened (lots of people, anyway), and everyone jumped in their cars and promptly came to be stuck (for days), on the interstate.

    According to news reports, The State of TX sent gas tankers to issue 5 gallons of gas to each vehicle. There was at least one instance of someone holding a gun on the gas tanker people telling them to "fill er up".

    Lets all get real about this "bug out" thing. Unless you are first, or last in the line to get out, you are apt to be stuck in a situation worse than you left.

    Think about how long food & gas supplies would be available in a mass exodus. Or if the minimum wage employees would remain on the job, instead of seeing to their own families.

    Pretend you are "Mr. Prepared". You have way more than enough gas, supplies, and have a great vehicle to bug out in. You are out of luck if everyone else has run out of gas ahead of you, blocking the roads/interstates.

    I think the notion of mass "bug outs" are pretty much a fantasy. At least as far as such a bug out going well, and in an orderly fashion.

    And it could very well get much worse than folks waiting around for a gas truck.
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    In Gibson v. Commonwealth, 237 Ky. 33, 34 S.W.2d 936 (1936), the High Court stated:  [I]t is the tradition that a Kentuckian never runs.   He does not have to.

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    Distinguished Member Array DingBat's Avatar
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    I think the decision to stay or go is largely based on circumstance.

    I am basically ready to bug in at a moments notice.

    5 years ago I probably could've bugged out within an hour or two.

    Now I have 2 year old twin boys. there are also 4 adults in my home. I could still bug out if I had too, but if the national guard showe dup today and told us to evacuate by sundown I would need every scrap of every second to get squared away. and still may have to leave things behind. long term living with my toddlers in a wilderness or SHTF or refugee camp situation would be exponentially more difficult with these kids. I am hoping that I only have 3-4 more years of real vulnerability left in this area. once the children are motile and can take and understand verbal direction, it should return my chances to normal. but at this moment my kids are my major concern, and my major liability. today I would probably stay longer than I normally would as displacing would be such a challenge.

    all of this assumes vehicles are useable.
    If I am forced to flee on foot with toddlers AND elders I am really up a creek.
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    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aceoky View Post
    All good points; especially IF you live in a section of the USA where you can easily get "bottle necked" for sure but how many know even 1/10 of the "backroads" we have in Ky, TN etc. etc. etc. - also what IF you don't wait until the "last minute" - paying attention to events "could" get you well ahead of the masses
    Yeah. I agree re back roads, and the like. HOWEVER, why do I have the sneaking suspicion that it wouldnt take too long before some folks living along those roads decided to start jacking cars of the fleeing "Outlanders"?

    You and I know that the vast majority of "country folk" would do nothing to harm others just passing thru. But it aint them Im talking about.

    Its the ones who are on parole, or probation, or have simply yet to make it to "the big house", who would see great oppurtunity for those like themselves.

    P.S. EVERYONE DOES KNOW THAT CREDIT CARDS ARE FROZEN DURING SOME EMERGENCIES, RIGHT?!? Like during the Katrina mess.
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    Senior Member Array Fizban's Avatar
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    Lets all get real about this "bug out" thing. Unless you are first, or last in the line to get out, you are apt to be stuck in a situation worse than you left.



    There are certainly varying degrees of fleeing/ bugging out. You might flee your neighborhood, your city, your State or time zone but if you are faced with a situation where you [must] flee or likely perish, does any of that [quote] really matter. Any critical decision a person makes could result in failure or worsening of their situation.. but defaulting into the "sky is falling" mindset is not likely to be very productive.
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    VIP Member Array Aceoky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StormRhydr View Post
    Yeah. I agree re back roads, and the like. HOWEVER, why do I have the sneaking suspicion that it wouldnt take too long before some folks living along those roads decided to start jacking cars of the fleeing "Outlanders"?

    You and I know that the vast majority of "country folk" would do nothing to harm others just passing thru. But it aint them Im talking about.

    Its the ones who are on parole, or probation, or have simply yet to make it to "the big house", who would see great oppurtunity for those like themselves.

    P.S. EVERYONE DOES KNOW THAT CREDIT CARDS ARE FROZEN DURING SOME EMERGENCIES, RIGHT?!? Like during the Katrina mess.
    .

    Agreed that IS possible (if not likely) we know from history certain folks will take advantage of any opportunity so presented - for those folks - all I can say is they best be "right with their Maker" as both my wife and myself would be heavily armed and ready..........

    Yes on CC being "frozen" (bank accounts , likely as well)
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    In Gibson v. Commonwealth, 237 Ky. 33, 34 S.W.2d 936 (1936), the High Court stated:  [I]t is the tradition that a Kentuckian never runs.   He does not have to.

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    Distinguished Member Array noway2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aceoky View Post
    Which begs the question :

    Now let's say the "powers that be" - up and "decide" you have a surplus and others are starving and confiscate what you have stored? Then they say "you have to come with us to a camp where your needs will be taken care of " (Fema camp IOW)

    I think that Is a realistic happening under National Martial Law BTW
    This speaks to the importance of operational security. Implied in that concept is concealement, both of yourself and your goods. Most likely your best option when TPTB shows up to relocate you to a concentration camp, er, I mean evacuate you for safety(*), would be to make like a ghost and not be seen. Similarly, you don't want them to take too good of a look and find your stash.
    * - This is why if I ever have children I would home school them. I envision that the way this would go down is for the children to be taken from school to a camp and then the parents would be notified that they can come and be with their children.

    Quote Originally Posted by StormRhydr View Post
    P.S. EVERYONE DOES KNOW THAT CREDIT CARDS ARE FROZEN DURING SOME EMERGENCIES, RIGHT?!? Like during the Katrina mess.
    I did not know that but I am not surprised. I recently had a discussion with my wife about how much money we should keep on hand at the house in the safe(*2). As a whole, we've become way too dependent upon money being numbers in a computer somewhere. This has lead to: 1, security issues with hackers and things like card swipe terminals, 2, banks making exorbitant amount of money in fees that we ultimately pay, and 3 (probably the biggest on my list), providing a paper trail record of when and where we spend our money. Big Brother, I mean Uncle Sam, has already made it clear that they feel compelled to spy on the doings of every citizen. Do you not think that they are analyzing the buying patterns of everyone too? I've recently been making a point of withdrawing cash from an ATM and using it to make purchases instead of the card. What I do and where I go is my business. Why should I make it easy for them.

    *Also under consideration is what type of barter goods to keep? The obvious answer is gold / silver, which would hold their value longer than paper currency. Such things might be good for purchasing larger ticket items, such as vehicles and expensive weapons post SHTF. However, I think more mundane items like TP, feminine sanitary products, booze, bullets, and other non perishable consumables would be the way to go.
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    Senior Member Array Fizban's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aceoky View Post
    Which begs the question :

    Now let's say the "powers that be" - up and "decide" you have a surplus and others are starving and confiscate what you have stored? Then they say "you have to come with us to a camp where your needs will be taken care of " (Fema camp IOW)

    I think that Is a realistic happening under National Martial Law BTW
    Please consider how many thousands of troops it would take to force evacuate even one city much less a State. The idea that someone is going to force you into a fema camp and take all your stuff is logistically impossible in a fast moving event such as a disaster. It would take months if people refused to go.
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    VIP Member Array Aceoky's Avatar
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    It didn't take much in NO post Katrina and that was not National Martial Law under which don't forget the likely use of how many UN troops .........
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    In Gibson v. Commonwealth, 237 Ky. 33, 34 S.W.2d 936 (1936), the High Court stated:  [I]t is the tradition that a Kentuckian never runs.   He does not have to.

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