Splitting Wood

This is a discussion on Splitting Wood within the Bushcraft - Primitive Skills - Survival Skills - Camping forums, part of the Related Topics category; So, I grew up at 10K feet in the Rocky Mountains. We had propane central heat, but it was more of a rare luxury/emergency thing. ...

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 33
Like Tree37Likes

Thread: Splitting Wood

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array DingBat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Rocky Mountains
    Posts
    1,630

    Splitting Wood

    So,
    I grew up at 10K feet in the Rocky Mountains. We had propane central heat, but it was more of a rare luxury/emergency thing.
    My parents built a log cabin kit that was about 900 sq. ft., which over the year they added to and became about 1,800.
    In it's final form we had 2 log stoves, 2 fireplaces, and one, actual, functioning wood/coal cooking range. a nice one. a monarch. almost identical to this one.
    monarch-malleable-steel-range-1910.jpg

    so if we didn't have at least 6 cords of wood to start the winter, we we're playing catch up all winter.
    hydraulic splitters are great, if you can afford one. if you can keep the engine running. if you have fuel. I have seen electric/hydraulic versions, but since we talk a lot about SHTF here....

    I have used a wedge and hammer of every shape imaginable....
    I have used mauls of most shapes and sizes...
    maulssledgesandaxesetc.jpg

    I even made one similar to this once...
    product_9580_600.jpg - it didn't work for nothing'

    including this interesting gadget...
    https://www.chopper1axe.com/
    OddAxe1.jpg - which works great on small stuff, but trying to crack open a big log, it won't do.

    now. I just randomly saw this in Yahoo!'s little under-section of not headlines news. and kind of freaked. I no longer chop wood, but I kept most of my kit for it and consider it part of my SHTF gear. of all the above, I found you usually ended up using all of it end an afternoon of splitting.
    I think this video may be deceived as the way he breaks apart that big ole log, I mean, it's gotta be one dry and soft wood to d that. I mean the above "chopper" could, sometimes do that it was soft wood, dry, and HAD NO BIG KNOTS.
    but if I was chopping wood still all the time I would be aweful temped to add this to the rack.

    Vipukirves-Axe-5.jpg
    KIRVES: Heikki Vipukirves



    now, I in now way think this light-weight looking little axe could do what he shows in the above video to a green piece of a weeping willow with a big knot or a few small ones. been there, done that. that's a "my two good wedges are stuck, where's my third and fourth?" kind of a log right there.

    some of you are chuckling because you know EXACTLY what I am talking about here. the rest, well, if SHTF the way some of us imagine it could, you may be glad you clicked on this, and if you see any of this gear laying around a garage sale and you're a prepper, scoop some of it up, you'll thank me.
    Attached Images
    Beans, Bullets, and Bandages. The only thing better than being ready is not having to use it!

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member Array Badey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    3,054
    I have a crappy wood splitting ax. I love splitting wood, but I usually only do 10 or 20 logs at a time. If I was going to do more, I would definitely invest in something like this. You're right, it might not be a bad idea to have around for a SHTF situation.

    BTW, I have been in a situation where both my wedges were stuck, and I didn't have anymore... it wasn't pretty.
    DingBat and Aceoky like this.
    Though defensive violence will always be a sad necessity in the eyes of men of principle, it would be still more unfortunate if wrongdoers should dominate just men -St. Augustine

  4. #3
    VIP Member Array LimaCharlie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    3,220
    I grew up in New Mexico near the Continental Divide in the 1950s. At one time, we lived in a two room un-insulated wood home with dirt floors and a wood cooking stove. The hand-pump water well was in the back yard. There was a path out back to the outhouse. We later moved into a four room insulated home with floors, indoor plumbing, a pot belly stove for heat, and a propane cooking stove. We were moving on up. My job was cutting and splitting wood. We also bought a truckload of coal every fall to stoke up the pot belly stove overnight. Getting up in the morning to restart the pot belly stove was a cold chore in the winter with the outside temperature at minus thirty-two degrees. At my age, I would have to hire someone to do it today.
    I carry a gun, because a Cop is too heavy.

    U.S. Army, Retired
    NRA Patron Life Member.

  5. #4
    Distinguished Member Array Arborigine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Calaveras County, California
    Posts
    1,694
    I prefer to do some mechanic, welding, or machine work, and use the money to pay someone else to deliver split, dry wood. I do have one of these crazy splitters (linked video) for the tractor, they took them off the market pretty fast after someone had his arms ripped out of the sockets and died. Modifying it with a steel deck like the small electric units in related videos would greatly reduce that risk. (he doesn't actually use it until almost 5 minutes into the video)


    I don't always have nothing to say, but when I do, I post it on Facebook.

  6. #5
    Distinguished Member
    Array oldskeetshooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Georgia..South of the mountains, north of the sand flies.
    Posts
    1,428
    Is there any good hardwood there, or are you stuck with the softwoods?
    A wise man once said: "Bugout bag?..What's that? Is that all the junk you sidewalk commandos plan on humping when the SHTF...I'll grab a Nylon 66, a box of 22s and a poncho liner and in less than a week I will have all of your stuff and everything else that I need for the duration."

  7. #6
    Distinguished Member Array DingBat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Rocky Mountains
    Posts
    1,630
    Quote Originally Posted by oldskeetshooter View Post
    Is there any good hardwood there, or are you stuck with the softwoods?
    not sure who you're asking...
    but if me, 99% local to high rockies is pine, fur, and the like. occasionally a cedar.
    down in the "flatlands" or foot hills there disigious(?) like cottonwood, willow, lots of things.
    of course everyone has everything everywhere now.
    but I grew up burning pine. we got in just enough hardwoods for to be glad we didn't get more. sure it burns longer, but only is harvesting it tougher, but it leaves more soot and ash. but we got it whenever we could.
    Beans, Bullets, and Bandages. The only thing better than being ready is not having to use it!

  8. #7
    VIP Member
    Array RoadRunner71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    6,348
    I'd like to seem him try that with a twisty, knotty piece of ironwood!

    I'll stick to a maul and wedges if the splitter is out of commission.
    "Mind own business"
    "Always cut cards"

  9. #8
    Senior Member Array txron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    836
    I lived in Steamboat Springs CO (8,000 ft elevation) for about 5 yrs and our main source of heat for the house was woodstoves. I will go into the back country cut dead tress in the fall, and split them into firewood. I used the trusty woodsplitter that you have in your picture (#1). I got more exercise doing that then I did lifting weights or running, but to be honest, I don't miss it. Now I live in Texas and I worry more about keeping cool than keeping warm.
    Last edited by Rock and Glock; July 3rd, 2014 at 11:05 AM.
    DingBat likes this.
    No trees were harmed in the construction of this post. However a large number of electrons were indiscriminately aroused.

  10. #9
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,486
    We heated our house with a woodburning stove in North Alabama and I have always enjoyed splitting wood.

    My Grandfather taught me his technique. I divide the logs into 3 piles, straight, knotted and wedge stickers.

    Start with the knotted and use a maul and wedges as needed, then use an axe on the straight. The wedge stickers are the ones that you need team work and multiple wedges to split.

    I use my Grandfathers double bladed felling axe to split the straight pieces, I use a wedge and a double beveled broad axe to work on the knotted ones and an occasional wedge when needed.
    DingBat, ccw9mm and Aceoky like this.
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  11. #10
    Distinguished Member Array Hodad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roswell, GA
    Posts
    1,482
    I prefer to spend my time splitting hairs!!LOL
    DingBat likes this.
    "Life is tough but it's really tough if you are stupid"

  12. #11
    VIP Member Array 1MoreGoodGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    6,118
    Quote Originally Posted by Arborigine View Post
    I prefer to do some mechanic, welding, or machine work, and use the money to pay someone else to deliver split, dry wood. I do have one of these crazy splitters (linked video) for the tractor, they took them off the market pretty fast after someone had his arms ripped out of the sockets and died. Modifying it with a steel deck like the small electric units in related videos would greatly reduce that risk. (he doesn't actually use it until almost 5 minutes into the video)


    Holy crap that thing is dangerous.
    19Kvet and Aceoky like this.
    Regards,
    1MoreGoodGuy
    NRA Life Member
    GOA Life Member


    Behave Like Someone Who is Determined to be FREE!

  13. #12
    Distinguished Member Array Arborigine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Calaveras County, California
    Posts
    1,694
    yeah, check out the "unicorn' that mounts on a car axle. . Adding a table makes it a lot safer, like this one, slow but effective and less dangerous than some of the machines I operate


    nortelrye likes this.
    I don't always have nothing to say, but when I do, I post it on Facebook.

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array 1MoreGoodGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    6,118
    That looks better than the other one.
    Regards,
    1MoreGoodGuy
    NRA Life Member
    GOA Life Member


    Behave Like Someone Who is Determined to be FREE!

  15. #14
    VIP Member Array Brad426's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    3,820
    Quote Originally Posted by Hodad View Post
    I prefer to spend my time splitting hairs!!LOL
    I prefer to spend my time sporting... oh, never mind.
    I have a very strict gun control policy: if there's a gun around, I want to be in control of it.
    Clint Eastwood

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member
    Array manolito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Milford California
    Posts
    1,222
    I heat with wood we have central heating with propane but at $3.65 a gallon I can't afford to use propane.

    Ben Franklin says wood warms you twice once when you split it and once when you burn it.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

bushcraft sweet gum uses

Click on a term to search for related topics.