Survival Triangle

Survival Triangle

This is a discussion on Survival Triangle within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; At the conclusion of classes people often ask me how they can continue to hone and practice their skills outside of class. My answer is ...

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Thread: Survival Triangle

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    Survival Triangle

    At the conclusion of classes people often ask me how they can continue to hone and practice their skills outside of class. My answer is to put as much of your skill sets into your daily routine as possible. Chances are that every time you do you will be thinking about your survival and reinforcing your mindset. Here some examples-

    Every time you are stationary in vehicle longer than a traffic light undo your seat belt. This allows you the freedom of movement.

    When walking by people on the street, make a habit of passing them on their right, your left. (This based on the fact that 93%+ of people in the world are right handed) Thus doing so will slow their reaction time and put you in a position to not only control their strong hand, but also isolate it from the weapons band (nipple line to waist).

    When you make a habit of being aware of your total surroundings and limiting your exposure by doing simple things, it will make the decision to use force that much more obvious because you have exhausted every other option.

    For too many people their survival triangle uses the gun and using it as a broad base. The truth is that the base should be awareness, then avoidance, and finally aggression. The very tip of the triangle should be "Pulling the Trigger". If it gets to that point you have done everything you could to avoid using deadly force and will be able to articulate that.

    Training that only gives you the choice of shoot/don't shoot on an audio que has little to do with the reality of defending yourself in the street. Look at your program, if it is tool based instead of training based maybe it is time to look for something different.


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    VIP Member Array grady's Avatar
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    Good info. Thanks for the tips.

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    Ex Member Array WhoWeBePart1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercop View Post

    When walking by people on the street, make a habit of passing them on their right, your left.
    That is very hard for most people to do. We are programmed from an early age to keep to the right. We drive on the right, we walk on the right. We pass people almost always on the right. If two people are walking towards each other both parties tend to drift to the right automatically as they get closer to pass one another.

    I understand your point but if I'm walking down the sidewalk and some is approaching I am going to move towards the right 99% of the time and if someone else started to move towards my strong side to pass the bells are going to start going off because it is not natural.

  4. #4
    AzB
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercop View Post

    When walking by people on the street, make a habit of passing them on their right, your left.
    What if you're left handed?
    Az

    -- Luck favors the well prepared.

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    Senior Member Array psychophipps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AzB View Post
    What if you're left handed?
    Good point, but it would still keep an arm of yours from being closer to their most likely dominant limb if you go in the opposite direction to their left. This technique is based upon your most likely dominant limb (your right) being closest to the most likely dominant limb (their right) to control any potential strikes or access to tools they might have at the time of the face-to-face assault in progress. If I'm getting the jist correctly, of course.

    The other side of the coin is, depending on your previous training, is this better than making them reach all the way around to get at you with their dominant limb? This is the case of a right-hander having to step forward and move their body around to strike someone moving on their left side.

    It bears some discussion, I think. But then, George is always making us rethink our options with his posts so it's not surprising, is it?

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    Member Array 120mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercop View Post
    Every time you are stationary in vehicle longer than a traffic light undo your seat belt. This allows you the freedom of movement.
    This I disagree with. Being securely belted in my car offers me better freedom of movement, because, not being locked into your paradigm, my car has better movement capabilities than I do in the great majority of threat scenarios.

    When I'm in the driver seat, my car is my primary weapon system, my gun secondary. (especially when I cannot carry) And if I'm hit by another automobile while stationary, I am still fully aware and fully capable of reaction, vice if I were submarined under my steering column and stunned because I failed to stay buckled up. I've been hit three times in my life while stationary in an automobile, twice while parked longer than a traffic light, and each time being belted in helped me retain situational awareness. Once, an individual attempted to pull me from a car, and my seatbelt retained me.

    Leaving my car is my last course of action in an emergency situation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 120mm View Post
    This I disagree with. Being securely belted in my car offers me better freedom of movement, because, not being locked into your paradigm, my car has better movement capabilities than I do in the great majority of threat scenarios.

    When I'm in the driver seat, my car is my primary weapon system, my gun secondary. (especially when I cannot carry) And if I'm hit by another automobile while stationary, I am still fully aware and fully capable of reaction, vice if I were submarined under my steering column and stunned because I failed to stay buckled up. I've been hit three times in my life while stationary in an automobile, twice while parked longer than a traffic light, and each time being belted in helped me retain situational awareness. Once, an individual attempted to pull me from a car, and my seatbelt retained me.

    Leaving my car is my last course of action in an emergency situation.
    +1 on that! Staying belted in keeps you more secure in impacts or if you have to suddenly and without warning drive offensively to leave an ambush situation.

    I just feel the number of times where remaining belted in the seat are gonna far outnumber an occurrence where having the seat belt off will be beneficial.

    JMHO.

    However, Mercop's suggestions keeps me thinking and I like that.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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