Point Shooting Versus Aimed Fire?

Point Shooting Versus Aimed Fire?

This is a discussion on Point Shooting Versus Aimed Fire? within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; The following excellent article is from the latest issue of the "Armed American Report" of the United States Concealed Carry Association. I think it describes ...

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Thread: Point Shooting Versus Aimed Fire?

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    VIP Member Array BenGoodLuck's Avatar
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    Point Shooting Versus Aimed Fire?

    The following excellent article is from the latest issue of the "Armed American Report" of the United States Concealed Carry Association. I think it describes very accurately what will most likely happen during a gun fight. If we want to make aimed fire second-nature, we are going to have to invest hundreds, if not thousands, of hours of dry-fire and live practice using our sights.

    Ben
    ==============

    Point Shooting Versus Aimed Fire?

    BY GABE SUAREZ

    Now that one should stir some controversy right? What would you say if I told you that they are not mutually exclusive, and that anyone who tells you that they are is wrong? I was once in the “sights all the time at any distance” camp. Then the reality of a reactive gunfight showed me that there are plenty of times when you will not be prepared for the fight, and have to catch up or die. At those times, any short cut is worth all the money in the world.

    Gunfights are either reactive or pro-active. In a pro-active gunfight, you have the information and justification that you need to draw your pistol and shoot. You can call it being pro-active, or even being preemptive to the bad guy's actions. Recently one of my New Mexico students told me of a case where an estranged husband visited his wife at the deli counter of a local market and proceeded to stab her multiple times with a butcher knife. The restraining order she got against him did nothing to protect her, but a local CCW operator who saw this moved into position, drew his pistol, and reportedly using his sights, shot the gun man to death. That is a pro-active, preemptive gunfight: No startle, no catch up, no problem. The only thing needed is a pistol, marksmanship skills, and the will to use them.

    Such gunfights, or I should say, shootings, make up the lore of sighted, marksmanship-based shooting methods. But such fights, while very supportive of certain skills, are not the norm. The norm is a gunfight where the other man, or men, has begun the attack upon a relatively unprepared victim. That would-be victim must first realize what is happening; when the information coming in reaches a tipping point that indicates he must act quickly or perish, he must react faster than the bad guy. Does it sound difficult? Does it sound dangerous? Right on both counts.

    What is lacking is preparation. I know all about the Color Codes, and about mental preparedness. I also know that human beings are fallible. We are over-worked, preoccupied and sometimes even physically sick. We are rushed, and we carry the weight of the world on our shoulders. Hardly conducive to living in a state of relaxed alertness. Rather than living in Condition Yellow--as my late friend Jeff Cooper described it--we often lapse into Condition Brown: Often sadly inevitable, it is the situation we may find ourselves to be in when the fight comes to us.

    Let's analyze what happens in a gunfight. You may see the bad guy. He appears to be a bad guy because of his attire, his demeanor and maybe even his ethnicity. Something about him isn't right. You catch yourself “profiling”. Unless you have cleansed your mind from politically correct programming, you might chastise yourself for being judgmental. Yet you are receiving bits of information constantly. You notice his eyes and where he is looking. You begin to notice that all the customers in the store are also looking at him. You notice that they appear scared. He is about five feet away now and you notice his clothing seems big for his small frame and you begin to wonder if there is a weapon hidden. Then you begin to notice the outline of a pistol butt and his hand resting on it. It is beginning to move from the belt line and toward you. His first words don't even register as the adrenaline begins to shoot through your veins. That is how it happens.

    Now let's look at the rest of the story: You draw your pistol. Actually, it's more of a grab and shove toward the bad guy than a shooting school range draw. You are looking right at him. Your hunter/predator eye is drawn to the movement of his hand and fixes on his gun. It is small and black. Your pistol is out by now, pointing at him one handed as your body screams, “MOVE!” Still transfixed by the image of him, and visually drawn to the gun moving toward you, you pull hard on the trigger once, twice, three times. Not the controlled trigger pressing you did in school, but hard trigger smashing. Your eyes have not left him as he begins to fall dead at your feet.

    That is a reactive gunfight and the most likely scenario for the CCW folks. To tell you that it's all about “Front Sight – Press” here is to insult your intelligence.

    So what is the answer, point shooting or aimed fire? Are sights useless? Should we rip them off our slides and train only inside elevators? Not at all. Point Shooting and Sighted Fire are two different ends of a continuum of shooting. This description was first coined by a man in Federal service who posts under the nom de guerre “7677” at Warrior Talk, and it explains the situation quite well:

    Shooting is a physical act that does not change. There are degrees to your visual focus (fully on threat, fully on sights or somewhere in between).

    So, analyze your shooting system. If all you are doing is pro-active sighted fire at medium distance, you may not be totally prepared for what Life's bad guys have in store for you.
    Ben

    Cogito, ergo armatum sum. I think, therefore I am armed. (Don Mann, The Modern Day Gunslinger; the ultimate handgun training manual)



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    This is EXACTLY why I bought a Crimson Trace laser. I practice point shooting every day in the house. From different distances, positions, and even while moving. Doesn't take long till you get REAL good!

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    Good stuff, two thumbs up.
    I prefer to live dangerously free than safely caged!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bentcursor View Post
    BY GABE SUAREZ


    ........If all you are doing is pro-active sighted fire at medium distance, you may not be totally prepared for what Life's bad guys have in store for you.
    Works both ways. Practice both and you'll be a better Boy Scout.
    "In a republic this rule ought to be observed: that the majority should not have the predominant power." -
    -- Marcus Tullius Cicero

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    VIP Member Array First Sgt's Avatar
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    Train...Train BOTH sighted and point...Train some more!!! Great article...Thanks for posting.
    Sometimes in life you have to stand your ground. It's a hard lesson to learn and even most adults don't get it, but in the end only I can be responsible for my life. If faced with any type of adversity, only I can overcome it. Waiting for someone else to take responsibility is a long fruitless wait.

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    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    Simple logic answers many questions.

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    My feelings are that for me, SD will be upclose, at least initially. First shots will most likely be point shooting.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

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    VIP Member Array gottabkiddin's Avatar
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    Yup, OldVet is spot on IMO. Depending on how the attack is launched, a startled individual will most likely not have time, or even try to draw and aim. IMO, it's a draw as fast as possible and point the muzzle at the target and fire away situation.
    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." – Luke 22:36

    "If a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so." – Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    My feelings are that for me, SD will be upclose, at least initially. First shots will most likely be point shooting.
    Quote Originally Posted by gottabkiddin View Post
    Yup, OldVet is spot on IMO. Depending on how the attack is launched, a startled individual will most likely not have time, or even try to draw and aim. IMO, it's a draw as fast as possible and point the muzzle at the target and fire away situation.
    ^^^^^I'm^^^^^^^definitely^^^^^^^^

    Thinking this is how most SD circumstances will evolve,
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    Train for point shooting, your aim (if you need to) won't be that bad.
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    VIP Member Array mlr1m's Avatar
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    With a gun that fits your hand point shooting is amazingly accurate. A single action revolver with standard grips is on target as soon as most people point it. It was designed that way. I have to work at that accuracy when using a double action revolver or a semi due to the difference in the way they fit me.

    Michael

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    Senior Member Array cz75luver's Avatar
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    I tend to train for both, but mostly point shoot especially when alone, although I did get spoken to last week at the range for shooting from the hip.

    I think it's funny how people always want to get into preaching about the perfect stance and doing things the "right" way. Unrealistic, IMHO. Being able to accurately point shoot is why I also consider gun-fit so important.

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    I only train point shooting and am getting more comfortable with it. Thing is I can't see my sights with my daily wear glasses and won't have time to change them out. The other day I tried to sight a few mags then pointed and pointed was better, definitely quicker and more instinctive.

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    VIP Member Array friesepferd's Avatar
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    i practice both. if there is room / distance for me to aquire my sights, i do so. if the person is more or less right on top of me, then laser + fire from hip
    Wo die Notwehr aufhört, fängt der Mord an
    (Murder begins where self-defense ends)
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    Member Array ECHOONE's Avatar
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    Just goes to prove,you should never train for only one purpose both camps have there value,you as an operator must be prepared for what ever scenerio arises.the more tools you have,the more prepared you'll be! you can't only train one way or your defeating yourself,you need as many assets as you possibly can obtain so train your abilities as such............

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