Hospital Situational Question

This is a discussion on Hospital Situational Question within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Have you or the patient bothered to speak to staff about a privacy hold? Doing this and a change of room will keep the violent ...

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Thread: Hospital Situational Question

  1. #16
    Member Array tbroy's Avatar
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    Have you or the patient bothered to speak to staff about a privacy hold? Doing this and a change of room will keep the violent visitor from making contact until security has the chance to intervene. Maybe placing the patient in a unit that can be secured? There are steps that a hospital can take to insure the safety of patients. You just have to let them know.

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  3. #17
    Senior Member Array tubadude's Avatar
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    A good start would be to give the hospital security office a picture of the BG. This was common practice when I lived on campus at WVU for anyone with a violent ex or other type of creep.

  4. #18
    VIP Member Array paramedic70002's Avatar
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    Hospital security is a hit or miss affair. Some will jump in, some won't.

    Oxygen is not an issue. It does not burn. It accelerates the burn a little. Tanks may explode or rocket away.

    Hospitals should not be using any type of flammable anesthetic.

    I would avoid pepper spray. It could drift and cause problems for other patients.

    Is the patient in a private or semi-private room? I'd hate to be the roommate when it goes down.

    The privacy hold is a great idea. Would the other relatives withhold the room number?

    Assaulting a patient could be viewed as a deadly assault when less force is used than on a random person as their condition is less than healthy.

    Even without a law against hospital carry, I haven't seen a hospital yet that doesn't have a property rights prohibition against firearms. Of course that is a decision you have to make. Some laws may make it an automatic infraction, others only after having been asked to leave.

    To the hospital admin who posted: I hope your plan works as stated. I have worked with several hospital employees who would not 'jump in' during an assault. My employer, a large health care system, specifically prohibits violence of any kind, for any reason.
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

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  5. #19
    Member Array JBJ9mm's Avatar
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    We have a privacy hold, however somehow he figured out what room she is in and has stopped by a few times. The staff did not notice his presence. The security staff is aware of his ban from the hospital however has yet to stop him once. It's a scary situation as he has now tried to drug her. The court system has been involved to try to put a stop to this however the local PD think this is a situation where the family is just "biased" against the abuser for some reason and has now blown off the family and the nurses that have called. The patient likely has dementia and frankly has no idea where she is. He wants her property and so forth should the worse happen and seems to be efforting this end. It is a very sad and difficult situation.
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  6. #20
    Member Array tomtsr's Avatar
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    OK, here goes.

    Questions:
    1. Do your fear for the life of the family member?
    2. Is there a disparity of force? Probably for 2 reasons. Male vs female, no offense intended. Physically fit vs sick and in hospital.
    4. Would the known mental condition prevent any hope of a reasonable resolution?
    5. What non lethal options are available?

    Decision:
    What would a reasonable person conclude the only viable resolution be?

    Personally, only as a last resort, shoot. But I'm not going to let my family member die in my presence.
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  7. #21
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    Not yet mentioned, you seem to be saying that the hospital is not doing their job. A talk with a private attorney, and he in turn talking to the hospital administrator may be necessary so that they understand that they have some considerable liability in this matter. A private attorney may also be able to speak directly with the prosecutor's office and help you by-pass the police to get this guy off the street for now.

    I know money is always an issue, but if you know sort of which hours he is likely to show up and which he is likely to stay away, perhaps you can hire a private security guard. For example, if he works regular day shifts, and sleeps midnight to 6 am, maybe you can somehow come up with the bucks for a private guard from 5 PM to 11 PM.

  8. #22
    Member Array Bigkahuna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paramedic70002 View Post
    Hospital security is a hit or miss affair. Some will jump in, some won't.

    Oxygen is not an issue. It does not burn. It accelerates the burn a little. Tanks may explode or rocket away.

    Hospitals should not be using any type of flammable anesthetic.

    I would avoid pepper spray. It could drift and cause problems for other patients.

    Is the patient in a private or semi-private room? I'd hate to be the roommate when it goes down.

    The privacy hold is a great idea. Would the other relatives withhold the room number?

    Assaulting a patient could be viewed as a deadly assault when less force is used than on a random person as their condition is less than healthy.

    Even without a law against hospital carry, I haven't seen a hospital yet that doesn't have a property rights prohibition against firearms. Of course that is a decision you have to make. Some laws may make it an automatic infraction, others only after having been asked to leave.

    To the hospital admin who posted: I hope your plan works as stated. I have worked with several hospital employees who would not 'jump in' during an assault. My employer, a large health care system, specifically prohibits violence of any kind, for any reason.
    We try to have drills at least once a month that cover this and other scenarios that would affect the safety of our patients and staff. Our hospital is located in a high crime/low income area and we get emotionally disturbed/intoxicated individuals in on a fairly regular basis. Police Dept is only one block away and we have a very good working relationship with them. They know we won't call unless we really need them and then they show up fast and in force.

  9. #23
    New Member Array Markomyt1's Avatar
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    All great information.

    If you have to go "Hands on" a held stun gun might even the odds and take the BG down fast while reducing the chance of collateral damage to the room and patient.
    Good luck, my prayers are with you.

  10. #24
    Member Array Savage206's Avatar
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    in my experience almost ALL hospitals have an existing policy regarding firearms on premises. Until you call them an ask do not assume otherwise. I was just at my local hospital in the emergency room about 2 months ago for a broken hand and had to check my firearm with security. Next time you walk in, look for signs posted on the door or by the reception desk. I am sure they are there. Just sayin....
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  11. #25
    Member Array Nine O Four's Avatar
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    Good scenario OP,

    Most hospitals do fail at security. I go to the Navy Hospital and of course firearms are prohibited because it's federal property. Having to show military ID doesn't help either, because anyone can bypass that by saying they're visiting an ER patient to get into the gate. To visit someone all you have to do is show ID at the desk and give the patient's name, and they give you the room info. When I was at the hospital I had people just show up at my room without knowing they were coming. With your scenario, I made me think that a BG could've easily got in my room (or anyone's room) and emptied their mags on a weak/vulnerable and undefended person. I think that the staff at the desk should buzz people in to see if they're expecting someone, if not they should deny them entrance. If they refuse, call security and escort them off the premises.

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