Neighborhood Watch

This is a discussion on Neighborhood Watch within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I am growing aggravated with the level of crime (i.e. break-ins) in my neighborhood. Particularly when the older woman who lives alone behind me had ...

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    Member Array Justified's Avatar
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    Question Neighborhood Watch

    I am growing aggravated with the level of crime (i.e. break-ins) in my neighborhood. Particularly when the older woman who lives alone behind me had her house robbed in the middle of a Sunday afternoon. So my question is this, how affective are neighborhood watches and how would one go about creating an affective one? Does one just talk to the local LEO and pass out fliers and have coffee meetings?

    Has anyone here ever started a watch or participated in one? What was your opinion and how would you have made it better? Would you invite the registered sex offenders in your area to the meetings? Do I then get to move about my area and night all tact out in camo and night vision goggles (JK)
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    Array SIXTO's Avatar
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    Call and see if your local PD has a community resource officer. That is where you start. The neighborhood watch program is as good as you make it. It can be absolutely worthless, or fantastic. Its up to you and your neighbors.
    "Just blame Sixto"

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    I moved your thread out of the Reference & How To area since that is a Moderator Approve area.
    It fits OK here but you didn't do anything wrong by putting it in Reference & How To...more members will see it here though.

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    Thanks, the more views the better.
    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    I moved your thread out of the Reference & How To area since that is a Moderator Approve area.
    It fits OK here but you didn't do anything wrong by putting it in Reference & How To...more members will see it here though.
    We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would harm us.
    - George Orwell Military

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    I figured it would be what we make it, just looking for any info that would help to make the most of it.
    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    Call and see if your local PD has a community resource officer. That is where you start. The neighborhood watch program is as good as you make it. It can be absolutely worthless, or fantastic. Its up to you and your neighbors.
    We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would harm us.
    - George Orwell Military

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    To make the most of it, you need to network with your local PD. The more of your neighbors that are truly involved the better. Get the PD to put on some training sessions so the people know what to look for and when to call. It sounds stupid but the worst thing a neighborhood watch can do is to make pests of themselves. We have one that calls every time a strange car comes into the neighborhood. 99.9% of the time, the car is simply visiting a resident. Crying wolf is a big problem, and it will quickly turn the PD off in being willing to help you.
    Monthly meetings (or maybe more often) are a big help too. That gets all the neighbors on the same page, as well as a representative from the local PD. You might have one piece of a puzzle, and your neighbors have the rest. Each neighbor thought their piece was nothing until all got together and talked. I cant begin to tell you how often that happens.
    joker1 and gatech33 like this.
    "Just blame Sixto"

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    That is kinda what the responding LEO said when he came out to my neighbor's house.

    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    To make the most of it, you need to network with your local PD. The more of your neighbors that are truly involved the better. Get the PD to put on some training sessions so the people know what to look for and when to call. It sounds stupid but the worst thing a neighborhood watch can do is to make pests of themselves. We have one that calls every time a strange car comes into the neighborhood. 99.9% of the time, the car is simply visiting a resident. Crying wolf is a big problem, and it will quickly turn the PD off in being willing to help you.
    Monthly meetings (or maybe more often) are a big help too. That gets all the neighbors on the same page, as well as a representative from the local PD. You might have one piece of a puzzle, and your neighbors have the rest. Each neighbor thought their piece was nothing until all got together and talked. I cant begin to tell you how often that happens.
    We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would harm us.
    - George Orwell Military

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    some agencies support civilian patrols others really aren't too cooperative.
    neighborhood watches/patrols can be good as long as the participants realize that they are observers and not leos.

    a person who is carryiny a gun is entering into very shaky territory when on patrol because the urge to get involved can be overwhelming. the trick is not to fall into the trap of playing leo.

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    Good point. Hopefully the PD will stress the only capacity is to observe and report.
    Quote Originally Posted by apvbguy View Post
    some agencies support civilian patrols others really aren't too cooperative.
    neighborhood watches/patrols can be good as long as the participants realize that they are observers and not leos.

    a person who is carryiny a gun is entering into very shaky territory when on patrol because the urge to get involved can be overwhelming. the trick is not to fall into the trap of playing leo.
    We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would harm us.
    - George Orwell Military

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    Contact local pd/sheriff dept. They will give you a presentation and some brochures (make sure hand out flyers to neighbors you want to attend-not the sex offender). Home — National Crime Prevention Council McGruff has resources. Get a good plan, stick to it. You will have a core few that usually carry the load for the others. Using the FRS type radios is good for communication-need a notepad/pen to take down info on any bad guys like the acronym CLAMMY (Color, Liscense#, Auto, Make, Model, Year). Observe and report only (binoculars, cameras, night vision probably ok) but NO GUNS...the police will frown on this and perceive you as a bad guy...unless you are on your "own" property holding a BG that's broken into your home or something. Believe it of not, most break-ins occur during the day, so will need to make shifts of people that can observe. Good Luck.

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    Good old Mcgruff, he never ages. Found a good website, i-neighbors.org, to help with communication. I believe it, my neighbor was robbed around 5 in the afternoon last Sunday and when I moved in I was robbed around noon during the week.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunsmoke16 View Post
    Contact local pd/sheriff dept. They will give you a presentation and some brochures (make sure hand out flyers to neighbors you want to attend-not the sex offender). Home — National Crime Prevention Council McGruff has resources. Get a good plan, stick to it. You will have a core few that usually carry the load for the others. Using the FRS type radios is good for communication-need a notepad/pen to take down info on any bad guys like the acronym CLAMMY (Color, Liscense#, Auto, Make, Model, Year). Observe and report only (binoculars, cameras, night vision probably ok) but NO GUNS...the police will frown on this and perceive you as a bad guy...unless you are on your "own" property holding a BG that's broken into your home or something. Believe it of not, most break-ins occur during the day, so will need to make shifts of people that can observe. Good Luck.
    We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would harm us.
    - George Orwell Military

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    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
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    A neighborhood watch is an idea, not a process. That is, you can't find a "how-to" guide that's going to be much help because every neighborhood is different, every threat problem is unique, and your geography and demographics will be local to you.

    Rather, there are some general principles that apply to most neighborhood watches, and you'll want to consider those as you set yours up and make it functional.

    1. The neighborhood watch is not a vigilante outfit.
    2. The purpose of the watch is to deter crime, not deal with it happening in progress.
    3. You are hardening your neighborhood with the watch.
    4. Part of the function of the watch is to build community - getting to know your neighbors and making friends with them and learning their names and their kids' names and where their homes are, etc., is the larger point.
    5. The team is armed with flashlights, not guns.
    6. If the watch spots a crime in progress, whistles and flashlights and cellphones are the response. But more importantly, it means the watch is not working right. Criminals should see that there is a watch in the neighborhood and decide to go elsewhere.
    7. The watch is more than people patrolling the sidewalks. It's neighbors watching each others' property, being observant of strange vehicles, calling in reports of odd activity. The walking patrol is only one element of a larger picture.

    Those are the immediate concepts that come to mind. I'm sure I've missed a bunch. At essence, it's the idea that an aware, cohesive community, by its very nature prevents crime. Criminals thrive on isolated, cocoon people who don't know their neighbors and who don't want to get involved.
    gatech33 likes this.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

  14. #13
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    This is my end goal. I know I try to be observant, but I want everyone to have each other's back. I really don't want people running aroung where i live with itchy nerves and loaded weapons. Cellphone best weapon, it takes pictures and makes calls. I would just like to educate people about what to look for and how to process the info they gather.
    Quote Originally Posted by shockwave View Post
    A neighborhood watch is an idea, not a process. That is, you can't find a "how-to" guide that's going to be much help because every neighborhood is different, every threat problem is unique, and your geography and demographics will be local to you.

    Rather, there are some general principles that apply to most neighborhood watches, and you'll want to consider those as you set yours up and make it functional.

    1. The neighborhood watch is not a vigilante outfit.
    2. The purpose of the watch is to deter crime, not deal with it happening in progress.
    3. You are hardening your neighborhood with the watch.
    4. Part of the function of the watch is to build community - getting to know your neighbors and making friends with them and learning their names and their kids' names and where their homes are, etc., is the larger point.
    5. The team is armed with flashlights, not guns.
    6. If the watch spots a crime in progress, whistles and flashlights and cellphones are the response. But more importantly, it means the watch is not working right. Criminals should see that there is a watch in the neighborhood and decide to go elsewhere.
    7. The watch is more than people patrolling the sidewalks. It's neighbors watching each others' property, being observant of strange vehicles, calling in reports of odd activity. The walking patrol is only one element of a larger picture.

    Those are the immediate concepts that come to mind. I'm sure I've missed a bunch. At essence, it's the idea that an aware, cohesive community, by its very nature prevents crime. Criminals thrive on isolated, cocoon people who don't know their neighbors and who don't want to get involved.
    We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would harm us.
    - George Orwell Military

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    VIP Member Array searcher 45's Avatar
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    In our small town we had a cereal rapist attacking very elderly ladies.

    The Neighborhood watch was started with full corporation of the county SO.

    We did active paroling and were armed with police scanners and cell phones and flashlights.

    Sheriff recommended we be armed for personal protection, but remember our mission was to observe and report.

    When we went out we were to call the SO and report in at the start of our patrol and when we went off patrol we called in again to report.

    Most patrols were 4 hours and many were from 2am to 6am when the rapist was known to strike.

    Wife and i the first night out were stopped by deputy on very high alert hand on Glock and ready to draw when dispatch answered his call in and told him we were the NW, and you could see the relief all over him.

    He is now a good friend as are a good number of deputies in our county,

    Rapist was caught in near by county and we have stopped the watch for now.

    Nothing like driving around town at 5MPH with window down listening and watching for anything out of the ordinary.

    As to being armed, I would not do this with out being armed and ready, at 3am it is easy to come up on drug deals and other illegal activity.

    While not LEO what to stop the BG from opening up on you as you observe and report.

    Using reverse gear to gain distance was my first plan while wife called in.

    In our monthly meeting it was openly discussed that a AK will eat the front out of your car and most likely do you in, so distance was our best defense.

    Never has any close call while patrolling but did call in odd actives.
    NOT LIVING IN FEAR, JUST READY!!!
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    nor the arrow for its swiftness,
    nor the warrior for his glory.
    I love only that which they defend.
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    Our local Code Blue - Citizen's On Patrol group is pretty successful in scattering the roaches into areas where they're less likely to be seen. It's affiliated with the police department, and there's a specific prohibition on carrying a firearm, even with a CHL. There's no restriction on pepper spray, 5 cell mag lights aka clubs, etc.

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