Learned a Lesson by Dropping the Ball

Learned a Lesson by Dropping the Ball

This is a discussion on Learned a Lesson by Dropping the Ball within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Been reading about different scenarios long enough to think I know what I'll do if something happens. Or so I thought. First, a little background: ...

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Thread: Learned a Lesson by Dropping the Ball

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Civil_Response's Avatar
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    Exclamation Learned a Lesson by Dropping the Ball

    Been reading about different scenarios long enough to think I know what I'll do if something happens.

    Or so I thought.

    First, a little background:
    I have a wife and 3 kids, along with 2 dogs - Duke, my Olde English Bulldogge who sleeps in the house and Bailey, (everyone but mine) Bischon-Shitzu mix who sleeps in the garage.

    Over the weekend Duke bumped his leg and got an internal bruise that swelled up pretty good, the vet poked a hole and it seemed to be healing up well until sometime Saturday when we noticed blood drops everywhere, apparently the hole opened again so we bandaged it up and tried to keep him calm the rest of the day/night.

    Onto the story...

    Last night I woke up to my dog Duke barking, after waking up I also heard our other dog barking in the garage. Once I got out of bed Duke ran into the living room, I chased after him and got him to calm down a bit because I was worried about his leg. In the meantime my wife goes into the garage to check on Bailey and see what the fuss is about.

    Nice, huh?

    It wasn't until this morning that it really hit me hard - I blew it completely.

    I plan to talk to my wife tonight about the incident and make sure we're on the same page if it should ever happen again, and I'm sure it will just due to the nature of dogs, especially Bailey who barks at a change in wind direction.

    Here's what I think I should have done, keep in mind we do have an alarm system. One child is across the hall, the other two are downstairs in their own rooms - I would never have bought this house if I knew then when I know now, but it is what it is.

    1. Wake up
    2. Get out of bed
    3. Unlock the safe and grab my gun
    4. Tell my wife to have her phone ready and check on the kids (wife has no interest in guns)
    5. I would assess the situation in the garage, then meet up with her

    This is all different of course if the alarm is going off, then I know there's a good chance someone is already inside. In that case my wife would go across the hall and I would get the girls who are most likely already making a b-line for the upstairs.

    I need to come up with a solid plan for each scenario, I do NOT want to get caught unprepared ever again - it really bothers me, but I'm opening up my little uneventful story so that hopefully:

    A: I get some help
    B: It helps someone else


  2. #2
    Member Array BillK's Avatar
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    Hind sight is always 20/20! Consider it a lesson learned and move on. Thank God it wasn't a serious encounter, and next time you will know what to do. It does serve as a great chance to talk to the wife and kids about what to do if something like this ever happens again.
    mano3 likes this.
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    VIP Member Array gottabkiddin's Avatar
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    Glad everything turned out to be much of nothing and hope the dog heals up good. I had my eye opener a few years back and I know what cha mean when you say how it bothers you once you reflect back on it. About he best you can do is exactly what you are already doing. Sounds like you have a good plan to build off of and make the necessary changes in the event there's a next time. +1 on the home alarm, I look at mine as the first line of defense; if it sounds off I know it's game on... Stay safe..
    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." – Luke 22:36

    "If a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so." – Thomas Jefferson

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    It's very difficult to execute perfectly on a daily basis.

    Last week, the doorbell rang at my house, and as I was getting my 1911 out of the safe to go answer the door, my wife and son had already beat me to it, and flung the door wide open (it was just my niece stopping by).

    Yeah, they know better. I console myself that I was ready, even if it was after the door was open.

    It's good to plan and recognize where you can do things better, but I also plan and train for when things don't.

    BTW, I like the pic of Duke in your avatar. He looks like a fun little pup.
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    VIP Member Array sgb's Avatar
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    You need to put a plan to paper and involve the family in acting it out. Then critique and adjust as necessary. Once you're satisfied with the plan it needs to be practiced.
    "There is a secret pride in every human heart that revolts at tyranny. You may order and drive an individual, but you cannot make him respect you." William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

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    Senior Member Array NH_Esau's Avatar
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    I'll repost this... My four situation ?s. As long as the first three are "Yes," you won.

    Are your loved ones alive and unhurt?
    Are you alive?
    Did you learn something?
    Are you unhurt?

    Bonus points because you told others (us), and hopefully we learn also.

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    Just consider it a practice drill. Learn from it, make adjustments, and keep moving forward.
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    Turn the election's in 2014 to a "2A Revolution". It will serve as a 1994 refresher not to "infringe" on our Second Amendment. We know who they are now.........SEND 'EM HOME. Our success in this will be proportional to how hard we work to make it happen.

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    You always do better the next time if you put your thinking cap on and play it all out in your mind.
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    VIP Member Array Civil_Response's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, talked to my wife tonight and she jokingly said "Yeah, you have 500 guns around here and where were you? Petting the dog!" :)

    Lessons learned... take each situation seriously, because it just may be.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Array MotorCityGun's Avatar
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    It might be a good idea to share and agree with all of the family members what the priorities are when it comes to staying safe. Then agree upon a plan(s) of action based upon priorities.
    “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.” - Ben Franklin

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  11. #11
    Member Array bigdogtx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thunder71 View Post

    ...
    1. Wake up
    2. Get out of bed
    3. Unlock the safe and grab my gun
    4. Tell my wife to have her phone ready and check on the kids (wife has no interest in guns)
    5. I would assess the situation in the garage, then meet up with her

    This is all different of course if the alarm is going off, then I know there's a good chance someone is already inside. In that case my wife would go across the hall and I would get the girls who are most likely already making a b-line for the upstairs.

    I need to come up with a solid plan for each scenario, I do NOT want to get caught unprepared ever again - it really bothers me, but I'm opening up my little uneventful story so that hopefully:

    A: I get some help
    B: It helps someone else
    Not really a critique, but a question. Is it best to separate in this scenario with someone in the house and wife and one child separated from you?

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    Practice it weekly for a while until it doesn't require thought. Having to think about the basic stuff really limits your ability to think when things go bad and don't go according to plan. The only thing I want to think about is stuff that can't be practiced regularly.

    So, I always have a gun on me or very close by. I do not have to get it from the main safe when something needs checked out. I do not have to think about how to make my way to a specific room or have to tell my wife what to do, etc.

    So, practice this stuff (or better yet, get some training in this so it can be practiced correctly) over and over until you can change it up on the move without having to think about it. Then, if something does go different than you've trained for, that's the only part you need to think about. I hope I'm making sense here. I know what I'm trying to say!
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdogtx View Post
    Not really a critique, but a question. Is it best to separate in this scenario with someone in the house and wife and one child separated from you?
    Yes, but not both moving unless there's a considerable amount of training. For us, everyone stays put or in something that is known to be bad, my wife gets one of both kids, depending, then stays in that room. We have two kids, both on opposite ends and levels of the house. So, I don't stay and wait, I go where I need to go. In most cases without children, I'd recommend calling the police and staying put until they arrive, defending the room you are in only if necessary. BUT, I don't know too many that will or have done that, especially those with a lot of training, children they need to get to or Type A personalities. It is what it is. We can say all day we should stay put, but that's not always possible.

    Now, unless I'm with someone I train with and work with, I don't want anyone moving but me. First rule is to identify your target before shooting, but bad things happen all the time to well trained people, let alone untrained people.

    In Thunder71's case, I see nothing wrong with moving to the room across the hall when you know someone is on your home. I also see nothing wrong with moving through your home, which you know better than anyone, to get to children in another area. There are sick people out there that will break into home to steal children as we've seen recently. Make all the movement you want, just know how to do it.

    Even if you're almost certain it was the cat, there's no reason to take a chance. Absolute worst case scenario if it's the dog or cat, you got a little extra practice time in.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array Civil_Response's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the input guys, really helps.

  15. #15
    Member Array nhcruffler's Avatar
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    Scenarios like this help keep us focused and hopefully we learn something. I am not sure what you have to do to reach a firearm as you mentioned getting it out of the safe. I like mine next to my bed. Only you know your comfort level with kids in the house. You might want to think about one of those small hand gun safes that you open by placing your hand on it and your finger tips do the combination. I did a quick google search and this was the first one I saw though there are many different models out there. Handgun Safe / Vault Hope Duke's leg is getting better.

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