Do you think about it? - Page 3

Do you think about it?

This is a discussion on Do you think about it? within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by glockman10mm I use to. Until over the years after a few incidents made it clear that any mental exercise on my part ...

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  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array tcox4freedom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    I use to. Until over the years after a few incidents made it clear that any mental exercise on my part could not prepare me for the way things go down.
    I've probably been in "MORE" than my fair share of bad events where weapons (and even multiple BGs) were involved. So, on one hand I tend to agree that one is not likely to ever be fully prepared. On the other hand, I disagree that mental exercises don't help at all.

    IMHO;
    The reason I survived in all the bad encounters I've been in (as an LEO & civilian), is directly tied to these types of mental exercises.

    -


  2. #32
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    I think it is impossible to prepare for every situation,we just can't read a thugs mind and know what they are thinking,or how they plan to execute their crime.This is why we must be prepared to fight with every weapon we have from our hands to our E.D.C.We could set here and "What-If" it to death,and still never have the desired out come.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Array NH_Esau's Avatar
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    I'll disagree slightly with Glockman's first comment as written, but not as intended. I do think visualization can prepare you, but because we exist in an unscripted environment, it can't prepare you fully.

    In theater, Buckeye's answer was my gig also - Locate and ID potential threats, Assess capabilities, Predict their best (for them) move, Disrupt that move, Engage or detach. That kind of preparation works great when almost everyone who's not next to you is a bogey, bandit, or hostile (though the BG often does something different and unexpected). Back home, the Friendly/Neutral to Bogey ratio is way too high to do that effectively.

    So I visualize as preparation, whether in training, or setting up/assessing home/office/workplace environment, or entering a higher-risk location, but I can't say that I can somehow visualize with any sort of perfection what might actually go down.

    Wasn't there a Nicholas Cage movie several years back where the guy could see stuff several minutes/hours/days before it happened?
    tcox4freedom likes this.

  4. #34
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    Train and prepare, physically and mentally, and realize that if something goes down it will likely not be in any of the manners you anticipated.
    Know Guns, Know Safety, Know Peace.
    No Guns, No Safety, No Peace.


    Guns are like sex and air...its no big deal until YOU can't get any.

  5. #35
    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BugDude View Post
    Train and prepare, physically and mentally, and realize that if something goes down it will likely not be in any of the manners you anticipated.
    You can do all of that.... but I'm with Glockmann; nothing will ever happen like you think it would, could , or should.
    You can be sure of one thing, expect the unexpected and the unplanned for, and to react accordingly. Never assume anything.
    I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. --- Will Rogers ---
    Chief Justice John Roberts : "I don't see how you can read Heller and not take away from it the notion that the Second Amendment...was extremely important to the framers in their view of what liberty meant."

  6. #36
    Distinguished Member Array Hoganbeg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VNvet View Post
    For those of you who did or currently ride motorcycles, I am sure you think often about laying your bike down if you see a accident ready to happen and you are going to be a part of it. What side will you lay your bike down and how will you move to stay on top of the bike so you slide with it? These thoughts need to be practiced each time you take your bike for a ride. Your best place to be if you have to be in a collision is on top of the bike to let the bike take most of the impact force. Screw the hot exhaust pipes.

    Like wise, every time you OC or CC, you must play out different scenarios as to what you will do, what you will tell the people you are with to do. To play these things out in you head may just save your life someday.

    So, to answer the OP's question, yes I do.

    Safe shooting,
    Vv
    Great analogy! These things all add up to a pre-considered response. No, you can't take everything into consideration, but the more scenarios you run through in your mind, the fewer details you will have to alter on the spur of the moment in the real world.
    tcox4freedom likes this.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Array sensei2's Avatar
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    while i agree that real life situations are not likely to follow a script, i like what First Sgt said about how he considers his surroundings and some of his possible responses. VNvet also has the right idea. it seems to me that what separates those of us who carry from those who don't, is that we are better prepared mentally if and when something bad happens. we aren't so likely to be paralyzed by, "i can't believe this is happening" thoughts. we are much more likely to react with, "i knew something like this might happen someday, and i know what to do".

  8. #38
    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tacman605 View Post
    I am going to ask this question in the simplest way I can. There is no trick part to it. No facts needed it is all the individual's opinion and literally in their own head.

    Here is my question.

    How do you visualize a self defense encounter taking place or have you ever even given it a thought? I am not talking about a Walter Mitty fantasy type thought but actually thinking about how it would/could take place.

    Do you see the threat from a distance, recognize it, be ready to draw?
    Does the other person back down?
    Do you have to fire and is it effective?
    Is the encounter close are you in a fight for your life?
    Do you prepare more for a home invasion or on the street type incident?
    Do the legal ramifications enter into the thought process?
    These are just examples of questions I thought of feel free to add or take away.

    One of the reasons I am asking is that to me the way you visualize this event taking place directly relates to how you train and what you train for. I fully realize that no one knows or can predict when, where or if it will happen. I am asking what thoughts if any you have had in relation to it.
    In my first post I commented on the mental aspects of visualization. However I think the OP had something different in mind. I'm not sure how any SD moment is going to go down, but I know its not going to be me standing in the short distance waiting for the BG to present himself..Rather I think is going to be, down and dirty, face to face, with me attempting to make distance, and getting the hell off the X while drawing and firing on the move. It will be nothing like we think. We can only prepare so much, and hope that we survive....
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

    Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means, that you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you......

  9. #39
    Ex Member Array MadMac's Avatar
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    I constantly evaluate my (and my family's) security issues and weigh risks to make decisions about various safeguards I will employ.

    I don't fantasize about killing another human being.

  10. #40
    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    The more one trains, in more than one defensive mode, then practices until that training becomes part of them, the better prepared you will be for what ever comes your way. The more one has at hand the less likely everything looks like a nail and the better you can think on your feet. He who can act without thinking what needs to be done will win most times.
    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. reinman45

    "Is this persons bad behavior worth me having to kill them over?" Guantes

  11. #41
    Ex Member Array oldrwizr's Avatar
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    In over 55 years I've never faced a situation where I would've pulled a gun if I had one. I'm getting my CCP (approved, in the mail) mainly because I wanted a handgun for home defense and figured what the heck. This way it doesn't have to be on the front seat when I drive anywhere. CC is banned anywhere in N.C. you're likely to need it, such as bars, events with paid admission, ATM's. I can walk around on the street with CC but I never walk around on the street. You park outside the door of anywhere you're going here and then you're banned from carrying inside the building. Oh well, it will be there when I watch TV and sleep.

  12. #42
    Member Array danwdooley's Avatar
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    Training and practice. The challenge is, is how to accomplish those unless you have gobs of available funds and time to engage in formal classes, seminars, and such. We can't all do that. But, that does not rule out the opportunity to "self train". So much IS mental preparation and even when we cannot engage in formal training sessions to the extent which we would like to, visualizing and walking through, mentally scenarios to the point where they can become mental reality (whatever I mean by that, but you know what I mean, I hope) helps. Memorizing response visualizations can be something like the childhood memorizing the multiplication tables. "Quick, what's 2 times 2." Even if we did not spend hours physically writing "2 x 2 = 4" on the chalkboard, the answer is ingrained enough that the answer pops out without thinking about it. Certainly SD is going to be much more dynamic and the situations much more complex and as has been stressed in this thread many times, we can't cover every situation but we can cover enough general situations to help a great deal.

    I think those of us, even if CC is new to us, who have been long term in the process of thinking of such things have an advantage over someone who out of the blue, with no previous thoughts on the subject decides it would be a good thing to consider SD. As a life-long off and on wannabe fiction writer, mental visualizations of emergency scenarios is a routine thing. I can't remember a time when I did not upon entering a restaurant seating area, move the table settings to the other side of the table from where the seat host placed them because I have always felt uncomfortable setting with my back to the entrance. I just have to see what is going on around me. It's not something I even think about but am aware of. I watch people in parking lots and in and out of convenience stores. That does not mean I'm going to pick up on every potential threat situation, but it's important to make that a part of our routine. Out of habit.

    We will also be surprised at how things we have learned, even if we're not aware of having made them automatic responses, will be skills right there when we need them. I remember how in Army BT they taught us to fall down safely without getting hurt. A little practice but it wasn't a constant grueling drill. Obviously it stuck. One day when for reasons I don't recall now, I must have ticked off a drill instructor and before I knew it he had me over his shoulder and I'm heading for the dirt. Not enough time to think about how to fall placing my hands and feet but I found myself in the textbook position of that taught fall on the ground. Not hurt at all. I didn't know how well the training had stuck but it did.

    So mental visualizing. Practicing drawing and firing (dry firing if that's all you can do) and think, and look around at your environment. Family members with you probably aren't going to be as aware so you have to do it.
    Dan,

    CZ82 nut

  13. #43
    Distinguished Member Array kelcarry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barstoolguru View Post
    I am vigilant and watch what is going on around me but I never preempt a shooting. I do look around when I walk into a Restaurant and take a defensive position whenever possible. Same when I walk into a building I look for exits and give the place a “what if” look around
    Thank you barstoolguru for an intelligent non-paranoid answer.

  14. #44
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    I think part of good training and situational awareness is trying to anticipate situations as best you can and be prepared mentally and physically through training. It may not happen at all, and if it does chances are it will not happen in any manner you tried to anticipate, but your training and thought processes give you more tools to adapt and overcome quickly.
    Know Guns, Know Safety, Know Peace.
    No Guns, No Safety, No Peace.


    Guns are like sex and air...its no big deal until YOU can't get any.

  15. #45
    Member Array Illusive Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    I use to. Until over the years after a few incidents made it clear that any mental exercise on my part could not prepare me for the way things go down.
    Very astute observation!!
    Glock 22 Gen 4 w/CBST
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    A man, without force, is without the essential dignity of humanity. Human nature is so constituted, that it cannot honor a helpless man, although it can pity him; and even this it cannot do long, if the signs of power do not arise.

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