An interesting broad daylight situation I had.

An interesting broad daylight situation I had.

This is a discussion on An interesting broad daylight situation I had. within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; This is certainly not an experience I would have expected to have in broad daylight.....In front of a sporting goods store of all places! This ...

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Thread: An interesting broad daylight situation I had.

  1. #1
    Member Array kairo's Avatar
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    An interesting broad daylight situation I had.

    This is certainly not an experience I would have expected to have in broad daylight.....In front of a sporting goods store of all places! This story happened a while ago--last spring, but that shoulden't matter too much.

    I was at work, when I got a call from my buddy letting me know he'd just picked up a new kahr .40 from Sportsman's Warehouse. I said "sweet, I'll be down there in 5 mins to check it out." (Nothing at work was more important then checking out a new firearm). It was chilly, and I was OWB carrying my ruger p89 with a jacket over it. I met with my buddy, his roomate who was with him, and we stood there and shot the breeze for a while and talked about guns. We were parked towards the back of the lot and I noticed a black buick, with limo tint windows driving around. It was not anything to be concerned about other than the fact that it was very much out of place with every other car being a lifted truck. Eventually the Buick begins creeping by us. I raised up a little bit in alertness, and scooted a bit towards the back of my jeep. Still not really concerned, but preparing myself to take evasive action. My friends took notice and I casually glanced towards the Buick but didn't slow up the conversation any. The car finally stopped in front of us, and the window rolled down. A young black gentleman was in the car alone, and asked us if we'd like to buy a bottle of jack danials. We declined and politely requested that he move along. What he did really shocked me. He simply let loose with a string of cuss words, then ducked down and put his hands below my eyesight. This put me on full alert and I quickly moved behind my jeep and put my hand on my gun. Luckily, the man came up empty handed and simply drove away.
    After he was gone, my one friend said, "Why'd you run like that?" I responed that I couldent see the guys hands, and after the cursing he just gave us, I had no idea what to expect.
    Then it occured to me, that I had acted in the interests of my own safety with little regard to my friends'. This disappointed me a bit, as I had always assumed I would act in the best interests of whoever I was with. When I reflect on it now, I admit that I would probably do the same thing. The threat went from being "not there" to "there" so quick that I didn't have time to issue instructions or advise. I simply provided for my own safety as quickly as possible. I later told my friends, "Guys, I love ya to death, but you gotta pay attention to what's going on, and be prepared to react. I'll do my best to help you, but when it comes down to the line, I'm looking out for myself first."
    That's the first time in my life I've been in a situation where another individual has really made me fear for my safety. I feel confident in what I did, but also guilty that I left my buddies standing there with their mouth's open getting cursed at.
    Nick
    He who fights and runs away lives to fight another day


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    Nice display of alertness there kairo

    This brings up some interesting issues. I haven't been around here long, but in reading the archives, tactical discussions seem to assume only three types of people: bad guys, loved ones, and innocent strangers. However, as your experience shows that the loved one/stranger categories aren't really all that clear cut. What do you do when facing a (potentially) lethal threat directed towards people you know and like, but who you would not necessarily be willing to lay down your life for?

    Obviously this depends a lot on the situation, but can you really take a "little bit" of risk to help someone in a lethal confrontation? Will a less than full bore attempt to help them just make things worse or get me killed? I don't know. If things go badly they (or I) won't just end up a little bit dead.

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    VIP Member Array PatrioticRick's Avatar
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    Don't know if I'd have done the same thing. It's not that you don't want to watch out for my friends, but they have to take the responsibility for themselves too.
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    Member Array glocksmygun's Avatar
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    It makes you wonder this question. As in lifegaurding you learn to put the victim inbetween you and an object that can hurt you. You do this because if you get hurt than you are no use and you are both in trouble then. Do you think an altered type of response would be a good idea. You take cover and if you have time to tell your friends to get down you do. If you get shot are you really any good to your friends then.

  5. #5
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    Being shot for a Friend cause they do not take cover would be foolish. If possible, warning them would be good.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kairo View Post
    Then it occured to me, that I had acted in the interests of my own safety with little regard to my friends'. This disappointed me a bit, as I had always assumed I would act in the best interests of whoever I was with. When I reflect on it now, I admit that I would probably do the same thing. The threat went from being "not there" to "there" so quick that I didn't have time to issue instructions or advise. I simply provided for my own safety as quickly as possible. I later told my friends, "Guys, I love ya to death, but you gotta pay attention to what's going on, and be prepared to react. I'll do my best to help you, but when it comes down to the line, I'm looking out for myself first."
    IMHO, you did act in both your own interest and theirs.

    You were the only one who reacted to the threat. I don't know if your friends were carrying or not, but they were plainly not prepared to react.

    By moving to cover and preparing to engage, you put yourself in a position to neutralize the threat if your subject has gone from cussing to attacking.

    With your friends caught flat-footed and in condition white, the only thing that would have helped them if the feces had hit the oscillating air impeller would have been rapid neutralization of the assailant. You moved to do that, if it had been needed.

    Matt
    Battle Plan (n) - a list of things that aren't going to happen if you are attacked.
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  7. #7
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    I wouldn't try to second guess your ingrained instinctive fight or flight reaction to an immediate perceived deadly threat and remove yourself from a possible direct line of fire.
    You need to save your own arse before you can use it to save other arses.
    The Paternal & LOVE bond is every bit as powerful as the "Fight Or Flight" and if you had your Wife & Kids right alongside you...then I'm guessing your instantaneous reaction would have been markedly different.
    Really not enough detailed specific info provided to qualify me to judge your exact reaction.
    Just glad that all worked out OK for you and your friends

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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kairo View Post
    Then it occured to me, that I had acted in the interests of my own safety with little regard to my friends'. This disappointed me a bit, as I had always assumed I would act in the best interests of whoever I was with. When I reflect on it now, I admit that I would probably do the same thing.
    First-responder's credo: can't leverage what you don't have. If you cannot first ensure you'll retain the ability to breath, stand, move, then you'll quickly be unable to assist anyone, despite extreme urgency to do so. This goes for getting a mask in a smoky fire, for gaining cover and a weapon in times of attack, for keeping your head while others are losing theirs. Kudos on the right decision.

    Your friends are adults and are responsible for their own skins on-the-instant. Just the way it is. They should realize this. I think you do.

    Presumably, the friends are not merely sheep but do understand about threat management. They should understand this and what it means, in practice, on the street, on the instant of an encounter whose speed/direction is not under initial control. It means, that for the first few moments of any encounter like that, they're on their own ... hence, each needs to be aware, consider ramifications, consider cover, be armed/able to defend, etc.

    BTW, reporting license plates to the police often works to help cleanse the daylight of such things. In a few instances, merely passing along a strong description (incl. plate) has resulted in a stop, questioning and, in a couple of instances, taking the perps to jail. Though, this was hardly first on the agenda.

    Kudos!
    Last edited by ccw9mm; October 24th, 2006 at 08:52 AM.
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    Senior Member Array GoodSamaritan's Avatar
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    Sounds like there wasn't much time to really think about it. Sounds like you did just fine. You reacted as best you could in the time you had, and you didn't over react. I wouldn't worry about it. We all learn things the wrong/hard way. I'll bet if something similar ever happens again, you will probably react with the benefit of this experience.

    BTW, since we haven't been properly introduced yet.
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  10. #10
    Distinguished Member Array randytulsa2's Avatar
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    This is a thought-provoking thread. I don't have any brilliant, original (or even very helpful) suggestions.

    The situation and this thread are instructive for at least a couple of points: 1) real life situations happen fast; 2) real life situations are unpredictable.

    I'm thinking it goes to show that you should tailor your training to what you're most likely to do. Some people translate roughly the same principle into "large muscle vs. fine motor skills", or whatever.

    What will you do when you go into survival mode and you get tunnel vision, etc.?

    How can you harness what your reactions will be in such a way as to maximize your ability to live through the situation?

    Occurences like the one Kairo describes are unpleasant, but they are astronomically valuable aids if we mine them for nuggets of usefulness. They give us the ability to extract our likely responses and plan accordingly.

    I don't think you did anything wrong, Kairo. People react different ways to different situations. What would be wrong would be to simply ignore or forget the incident and not try to use it as a training aid. It would be worse yet to intentionally train in such a way as to not take into account your reactions.

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    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
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    You did fine...your instincts were probably right on (based on the drivers reaction)...and your actions probably made the driver re-think what he was going to do next.

    The cussing and swearing were probably to put you on the defense and to illict a response from you/your friends to "cause" him to react because you were "dissing" him.

    Once he saw there was a sheepherder among the sheep (you!)--he probably thought it was best for his health that he leave.

    This is definitely a teaching point to your friends--Friends don't let friends be in condition white. *They* too, need to take responsibility for their safety--especially if they are now carrying.

    My 2 cents.

    Mike in VA

  12. #12
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    Senior Member Array pax's Avatar
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    MattLarson's post nailed it, IMO. By moving to cover and preparing to fight back if necessary, you did what you needed to do to protect both yourself and your friends. If it had been what you thought it was, the situation would not have been improved if you had stood in the open along with them.

    I don't think you need to beat yourself up over abandoning your friends -- you didn't. It isn't as though you ran away completely, and were not prepared to fight if necessary.

    pax
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    VIP Member Array Rob72's Avatar
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    That's a new twist- I wonder what his scam was? Get someone close to the car, stick a gun in their face, and take them to an ATM, or..... The crack business must be really bad, if they're trying to make cold-sales! That's got to be one of the stranger situations...... Good response!

  14. #14
    Member Array gotammo's Avatar
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    You did good, you did tip off your friends to the threat if they choose not to act that does not make you responsible for them.

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    Senior Member Array Fragman's Avatar
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    Looks OK

    Sounds like you did OK to me. They're adults and need to get themselves to cover too. You can't help them or cover them if you are down.

    In fact, who knows, you may have actually stopped something. From what you described, it could very well have been clear to the potential BG that you were taking cover and going for your own weapon. Even without drawing. If I saw someone dive behind a vehicle, and move his hand to his waist, I would think he was doing what you were doing.

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