CCW..It does change your attitude.

CCW..It does change your attitude.

This is a discussion on CCW..It does change your attitude. within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; We all know that once we get our permits, our attitudes change. We no longer fly off the handle or take offense for any silly ...

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Thread: CCW..It does change your attitude.

  1. #1
    VIP Member
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    CCW..It does change your attitude.

    We all know that once we get our permits, our attitudes change. We no longer fly off the handle or take offense for any silly thing and some of us have posted before along those lines. But I do believe the other attitude change is that we stop reacting like victims if we detect danger.

    Last night coming from work I went by the drive-thru of Miami Subs. Those that do not know this franchise, they advertise that they only prepare your order when you arrive, no prepacked meals set up. One drawback is your order takes time and you are sitting in your car waiting and waiting. There has been a couple of robberies in the past at different Miami Subs drive thrus with one ending up in the killing of a customer inside her car.

    I had ordered my food and was waiting behind another car and as I waited, I kept a constant scanning of the area paying particular attention to my rear view mirrors. All of the sudden I catch on my side mirror one guy peeking from behind the building and hidding real quick. My alarms went off and I carefully drew my gun and kept it outside the view from anybody that might be watching. Did another scan to see if anybody else was giving me any undue attention at that time (minutes before midnight) and returned my attention to the side mirror. The guy was again peeking and I just stared back at him via the mirror. I saw him realizing that I was looking straight at him and he came out from the corner, moved back a couple of steps, turned around and left. By this time the car in front of me had moved so I advanced to the window, paid, got my order and warned the kid who gave me my food that a suspicious looking character was right behind his shop and might want to call the cops. I left the area and headed home.

    I do believe it was the attitude I presented that made the guy think and decide I was not a target... if his intentions were not peaceful. I analyzed myself and found out that I was not angry or particulary scared, somewhat nervous yes but I mostly felt insulted: "How dare you think of me as easy pickins'?" and I guess it showed enough to defuse a possible situation.

    Your thoughts?
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!


  2. #2
    Member Array walther1's Avatar
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    That was a great way to handle the situation. I believe when someone is armed they are more cognizant of everything around them.

    Your wit and the fact that you were not a may have saved you some big headaches.

    Stay safe!
    -------------
    Walther1

    Life, liberty, and the pursuit of the ultimate CC gun!

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miggy View Post
    The guy was again peeking and I just stared back at him via the mirror. I saw him realizing that I was looking straight at him and he came out from the corner, moved back a couple of steps, turned around and left.
    I do believe it was the attitude I presented ... and I guess it showed enough to defuse a possible situation.
    It's a fine line. Some thugs will take a "diss" from very little, mere glances in some instances. Some will go off the handle with an outright stare-down. No way to tell.

    Congrats on handling it simply, firmly.

    I'm with you, though. I maintain a low profile. I go about my business. I adjust direction and proximity depending on the nature of the field (and that can change while moving through it). I work very hard to keep my antennae at 110% functionality at all times. In 11yrs of carrying, I have yet to be caught utterly by surprise. My bearing, alertness and "evaluation" scan is subtle and understated, but it's apparently enough to show I'm perfectly aware of the guy and understand he's there. To a hoodlum pro, I'm sure it's "read" as a do-not-touch sign on my forehead. But so far, in small doses, it has worked fine.
    Last edited by ccw9mm; November 15th, 2006 at 10:53 PM.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  4. #4
    Member Array Bando's Avatar
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    I definitely feel a heightened sense of awareness and confidence. As you said, things that would anger me just roll off my back. I also look people in the eyes. Not to challenge them in any way, but to predict their intentions. I can immediately get a vibe off of a sketchy character. This I assume tells BG's a very clear message, "I don't have my head in the clouds, I am ready". Before I had any sort of training I remember intentionally making very brief eye contact or none at all. I bet that I looked like prime steak to anyone looking for trouble.
    The Problem: When stupid people do stupid things, smart people end up getting killed.

  5. #5
    Member Array katmandoo122's Avatar
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    There's nothing like a couple pounds of metal on your hip to remind you that it is a dangerous world. And it also reminds you that you are prepared for it.

    Sounds like you handled it appropriately, although I would start eating at Subway now...at least at night.

  6. #6
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    Thanks ccw9mm and Bando for the comments :)

    Quote Originally Posted by katmandoo122 View Post
    Sounds like you handled it appropriately, although I would start eating at Subway now...at least at night.
    I think the Subway is closed at that time.
    But you do present a interesting thought: On first glance it would be a sensible thing to do not to let the situation repeat itself so the logical course of action would be to forego Miami Subs late nite snacks. But then again, Am I modifying my lifestyle as dictated by the action of a bad guy? Should I stand firm and say "screw it, they do not dictate what I do or how I live" ? Of course we have already done that to an extent by carrying a handgun and being constantly aware of our surroundings but, Where is the line? Is there a line?
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miggy View Post
    Am I modifying my lifestyle as dictated by the action of a bad guy?
    Sure. It's wisdom. Forget the ego and what others deem your actions imply ... as if their conception of your willingness to remain a victim has any consequence except on your conception of them.

    The BG is generally in control of the crime, but we have the ability to affect the probability of a crime occurring and the probability of its outcome. And that's done through: altering the patterns we engage in; changing the times at which we do certain activities; changing the locale; changing our mode of dress; going in groups, instead of alone; going armed; increasing and tuning our situational awareness and preparedness. None of which implies we're folding, or giving in. When considered as part of the layers of one's defense, it's wisdom pure and simple.

    What should you do? Dunno. I'd recommend considering each element and then deciding based on what's important to you.

    Data point: Changes I have done include a variety of minor things. I have adjusted the times when I do certain things, to avoid risks if they're apparent. I frequent certain stores and shops based partly on the tactical advantages the layout of their stores provide (ie, multiple exits, areas of cover inside, clear visibility of lanes of fire and of entry/egress). If driving, I go with the windows up and doors locked (which has helped me survive two attempted carjackings). Keeping the "radar" turned on has helped me quickly identify and determine threats, on numerous occasions; and, I believe, it is critical to maintaining sufficient tactical distance in situations where BG's are actively scanning for opportunities. My mode of dress has slightly changed, to accommodate specific carry options, even if other considerations must take a back seat (like someone else's concern I might be under/over-dressed). Avoid businesses that have a "no firearms" policy, as that simply clears the field for the BG's and increases the likelihood for crime. Works for me. YMMV.
    Last edited by ccw9mm; November 16th, 2006 at 09:36 AM.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  8. #8
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    I do think, speculate anyways - that your average BG, the type that has at least some brains (whole 'nother subject LOL), will consider victim choice carefully, as he most likely wants the surprise element. Get in quick and get out quick.

    This means very possibly that the potential victim they are casing will have to be pretty obviously unaware of much at all. Once a BG sees a person scanning, and also if walking, holding themselves erect and assured, chances are they will look elsewhere - not that we can assume that to be a default.

    So being aware is not just a primary excercize for the self but also a display of ''non-victim'' status.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

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