Are We Being Tactically Smart?

This is a discussion on Are We Being Tactically Smart? within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; One thing that seems to be prevalent is that people have a difficult time doing risk-assessment and cost-analysis in their self-defense plans. It's easy to ...

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Thread: Are We Being Tactically Smart?

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    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    Are We Being Tactically Smart?

    One thing that seems to be prevalent is that people have a difficult time doing risk-assessment and cost-analysis in their self-defense plans.

    It's easy to get seduced by the idea of having a lot of firearms (which is fun and understandable), and failing to harden one's abode for about the same cost as two handguns. Or they fail to lock doors in the house and the car, or fail to train up their families so they can function as a team.

    We know the experts talk about doing fire drills in the home, but it's probably rare that a family really does that but once or it's on a wish list that never happens. We lock up our firearms in safes which the BGs can grab, because we've put 'Shootin' iz fun' bumperstickers on our cars and we get followed home (perhaps a myth, though).

    We think we're safe in our houses so we unstrap and put the guns in one safe and ammo in another when in reality, you're probably more likely to be targeted at home than in a random street encounter. It's thought to be paranoid to wear around the house. We try to think of our firearm as just a tool, like the cell phone, but people keep picking at the right to bear arms, so we get distracted, have to conceal under confining layers of clothing.

    I think it's important to try and step back, do a cost analysis, a risk assessment, consider analyzing the home for weak points, figuring out how not to be a target and how to do the 3 S rule.

    It's not glamorous to spend $1K on beefing up the home, windows and doors, installing lighting and alarms but it's part of the layering knowing that sooner or later one part of your plan can fail (like a power outage). All it takes is a moment of inattention at the wrong time.

    It's great to have forums like this one where people can help other folks to look at the big picture.
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    Distinguished Member Array Hodad's Avatar
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    Complete "hardening" of your house is a good idea, but if, for various reasons, you can't do that at least know where the weak points are and defend those areas.

    Keep in mind that you are already one up, because they are on your turf. Just take it to the next level.

    Use a little common sense, logic and creativity and you can funnel the bad guys into a pretty narrow "kill zone" where you increase your advantage.
    "Life is tough but it's really tough if you are stupid"

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    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hodad View Post
    Complete "hardening" of your house is a good idea, but if, for various reasons, you can't do that at least know where the weak points are and defend those areas.

    Keep in mind that you are already one up, because they are on your turf. Just take it to the next level.

    Use a little common sense, logic and creativity and you can funnel the bad guys into a pretty narrow "kill zone" where you increase your advantage.
    I understand this, but bear in mind that once the BG(s) get inside your house or defensive perimeter then a new 'rule' comes up and that's 'high chaos'. When a fight or an encounter is starting and nothing has happened (time=0), the chaos is low - the BG can attack or can pass you by.

    Your chances of defending once there is a breech, start to go down quickly as chaos rises. Think of it as the 'floodgate principle'. In addition, you can't always channel the BG into the right tactical zone - you're adding a dimension that is making things more complicated. It -can- work, but beware of that chaos principle. Thanks for your input!

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    Distinguished Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    Complete hardening of my home is not cost effective either. I have layered security, Fences, locked gates, outside dogs, etc... A lot of this is to defend my gun collection! The likelihood of needing this is pretty low. The most likely places where I would be accosted are the highway, parking lots, shopping, etc. And even that is pretty low. DR
    Last edited by Rock and Glock; June 13th, 2013 at 11:26 PM.

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    When I was in Economics in Collage we did a couple weeks on the "Economics of Crime". It was one of the more interesting things I ever did in Collage. A few things I learned. Punishment doesn't matter to criminals because they don't really think they will be caught, so the threat of being jailed doesn't come into their thinking. They look for easy targets. They want a place in which they will have easy access and no one resisting them. Large dogs will make them think twice as will large fit people. If you have a dog, a beware of dog sign can encourage them to move on to their next target.

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    The most vulnerable point in my home is the back door, about seven steps from where my head lies when I sleep. Getting through the locked screen door and inner door is going to require noise and time, neither of which works in a would-be intruder's favor. As far as guns locked in my safe, yes, it weighs several hundred pounds and is anchor-bolted to the floor at the bottom of a flight of stairs. My personal and home protection guns can be accessed and deployed in maybe two seconds from the time I awake.
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    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    I agree that the main function of layers of security is not to keep the BG out. It's to give you time and space to mount a response. If you're serious about that, run a scenario, and have someone time you. Or, stand outside your abode and think like a BG and imagine how -you- would get in.

    For those with safes, a lot of the time the BG has the combination to your safe. Think in terms of a locksmith getting into one if you'd lost the combo. You can usually call up the safe company and if you say and do the right things, get a replacement combination. (often you have to send a notarized letter of ownership).

    But those are down at the low end of risk. It's extremely unlikely that some things will happen. It's best to look at holes in your systems. That's why 'layering' is good. One layer may fail but not all at once.

    Good replies!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1956 View Post
    The most vulnerable point in my home is the back door, about seven steps from where my head lies when I sleep. Getting through the locked screen door and inner door is going to require noise and time, neither of which works in a would-be intruder's favor. As far as guns locked in my safe, yes, it weighs several hundred pounds and is anchor-bolted to the floor at the bottom of a flight of stairs. My personal and home protection guns can be accessed and deployed in maybe two seconds from the time I awake.
    Yeah. It took 3 grown men and a hand cart to get my safe into the basement when it was EMPTY. If they can get it unbolted and up the stairs then they can have it.


    @OP: It all depends on how hard you want to make your house. IMO a fire is the most dangerous threat to my home and family. Putting bars on the windows would help security but it may also cost my entire family their lives in a fire. So what does "hard" really mean and how "hard" is too hard?

    IMO good lighting and a barking dog early warning system are the two best home defense tools on the market.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadgerJ View Post
    I agree that the main function of layers of security is not to keep the BG out. It's to give you time and space to mount a response. If you're serious about that, run a scenario, and have someone time you. Or, stand outside your abode and think like a BG and imagine how -you- would get in.

    For those with safes, a lot of the time the BG has the combination to your safe. Think in terms of a locksmith getting into one if you'd lost the combo. You can usually call up the safe company and if you say and do the right things, get a replacement combination. (often you have to send a notarized letter of ownership).
    I recently conducted the exercise you suggest, as described here: Someone Tried To Get In Our House This Morning

    My gun safe is accessed with a double-cut, cannot-be-duplicated key that even I as a subsequent owner cannot get a spare key for.
    "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk."
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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    Yeah. It took 3 grown men and a hand cart to get my safe into the basement when it was EMPTY. If they can get it unbolted and up the stairs then they can have it.


    @OP: It all depends on how hard you want to make your house. IMO a fire is the most dangerous threat to my home and family. Putting bars on the windows would help security but it may also cost my entire family their lives in a fire. So what does "hard" really mean and how "hard" is too hard?

    IMO good lighting and a barking dog early warning system are the two best home defense tools on the market.
    For some reason, the like icon doesn't appear on your post.
    Never mind, there it is.
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    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    When assessing your SD layering the key thing is not to look at it and say how good it is. You should look for weaknesses. I'm constantly reminded of the guy with a wife that was very anti firearms. When the BG broke in she -had- his gun but didn't know how to operate the safety. Yikes!

    I do agree that fire is one of the main risks and it's a problem having bars on windows. I do like the 3M treatment you can get - a clear sheeting that is break resistant. If I was not in a gated community, I'd be looking at that option.

    Another thing about safes is that the harder they are to open the more likely that the owner will not spin the dial or not even lock it. Not saying folks here do that, but it's a weakness in any security that's too robust.

    I would be a -bit- worried about having a one-of-a-kind key. Don't you fret about losing it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BadgerJ View Post
    When assessing your SD layering the key thing is not to look at it and say how good it is. You should look for weaknesses. I'm constantly reminded of the guy with a wife that was very anti firearms. When the BG broke in she -had- his gun but didn't know how to operate the safety. Yikes!

    I do agree that fire is one of the main risks and it's a problem having bars on windows. I do like the 3M treatment you can get - a clear sheeting that is break resistant. If I was not in a gated community, I'd be looking at that option.

    Another thing about safes is that the harder they are to open the more likely that the owner will not spin the dial or not even lock it. Not saying folks here do that, but it's a weakness in any security that's too robust.

    I would be a -bit- worried about having a one-of-a-kind key. Don't you fret about losing it?
    Yes, I worry about it, but since I cannot get it duplicated, I am extra-careful with it. It is a very good safe, so I go with it.
    "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk."
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadgerJ View Post
    When assessing your SD layering the key thing is not to look at it and say how good it is. You should look for weaknesses. I'm constantly reminded of the guy with a wife that was very anti firearms. When the BG broke in she -had- his gun but didn't know how to operate the safety. Yikes!

    I do agree that fire is one of the main risks and it's a problem having bars on windows. I do like the 3M treatment you can get - a clear sheeting that is break resistant. If I was not in a gated community, I'd be looking at that option.
    That film is something I will consider. I have two kitchen windows that look out onto my front porch. They are the most vulnerable point of entry into my home.
    Mark Twain:
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    patriot and who isn't. Its function is to obey orders, not originate them.

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    Nix
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    I live on a military installation. We don't lock our doors (in case the neighbor wants to pop in); I don't even carry a house key (it would probably take me a good 10 to 20 minutes to find it!). We don't lock our car's doors or garage. I keep all firearms in a safe, unloaded, in case one of the neighborhood kids comes in the house when we are out. We sleep with our windows wide open and doors unlocked (because we are too lazy to lock them, and they are always unlocked anyway). We have dogs, but I'm not sure they wouldn't sleep right through an intrusion (I have snuck up on them before).

    I don't always appreciate how nice it is to sleep at home without feeling fearful. Reading this thread has definitely made me appreciate how comfortable we are here. It's kind of sad to see how much of a concern it is for so many people. Y'all stay safe.

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    Distinguished Member Array Jaeger's Avatar
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    7Ps is valid (Proper Prior Planning Prevents Painfully Poor Performance, or some variation of "painfully"), but no amount of material preparation is a substitute for being mentally prepared for an intruder.

    My house isn't a fortress and I don't want it to be. I think General Patton had something to say about fixed fortifications...

    My cattle dog is going to be going nuts before they touch my house. She's the sweetest dog ever, but I've seen her chew the cover off a golf ball, and turn the insides to sand in about five minutes. If she bites for keeps it's going to leave a mark. It's amazing how she'll wag and want strangers to pet her, but if it's night and she doesn't recognize you she goes berserk. They get through her and my security system has a 110+ db screamer on it (armed, stay). They enter, it starts screaming so loud you can barely think, and it calls the cops (response time in my neighborhood is very short, minutes). If they are stupid enough and fearless enough to keep advancing toward my family through that, I'll be sitting tight, in cover, with defilade, clearing the landing on the stairs of all comers. The Boys of Point Du Hoc will have had it easier.

    I sleep with no worries. I don't disagree with any of the thoughts put down, but before I did all that I'd get a dog. There is no security that's better than the 10,000 year old alliance of man and canine. They'll also make you happier in life generally! They seem to possess all our virtue with few or none of our vices.
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