Felon defends home and is arrested...

Felon defends home and is arrested...

This is a discussion on Felon defends home and is arrested... within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I hope this has not been posted previously. The scene occurred yesterday in Houston. What are your feelings ? My feelings are mixed. Texas state ...

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Array USM1976's Avatar
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    Felon defends home and is arrested...

    I hope this has not been posted previously. The scene occurred yesterday in Houston. What are your feelings ?

    My feelings are mixed. Texas state law allows for a felon to "possess" a firearm on the 5th anniversary of his release from his sentence. Federal law allows for NO possession of a firearm by a felon. Should this be changed ? Perhaps, should there be a distinction between violent crime conviction as opposed to no-violent convictions ?

    What say you ?

    Man arrested after firing gun at home burglary suspect | News - Home


  2. #2
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    My opinion is that those convicted of non-violent crimes should get a second chance--in everything. The violent thugs--tough luck.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    If a person's actively engaged in crime while "defending" himself, then he gets what's coming to him.

    Once a person has been released back into society, that person is deemed a full and complete citizen with all the rights, privileges and responsibilities of every citizen, as the Constitution intended. IMO, this should be the way it is. If a person is not otherwise safe to release, then don't release, but that shouldn't apply to any but the recidivist two-timers who've proven they cannot be trusted with living amongst us. For the rest, though, ...

    And if a person, any person, gets unjustifiably attacked by a criminal, unrelated to any crime the person is committing of course (ie, running a grow house, or whatever), then I believe that person has every right under the sun to defend against that unjustifiable attack ... including using weaponry, if that person deems it's necessary to protect his life. Absolutely. Else, if such fundamental things can be taken from a citizen after previous mistakes and paying for those mistakes, then citizenship has no real meaning.

    JMHO.
    Last edited by ccw9mm; August 30th, 2013 at 11:42 AM. Reason: spelling, grammar
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
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    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
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    Your actions have consequences. He choose to be a felon, no one made him do it. He has to live with the consequence of what that means. One of the biggest problems in this country today is this lack of "responsibility for one's actions". His actions put him in that situation, it is now his to live with.
    Stevew and bmcgilvray like this.

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    Member Array jake1's Avatar
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    If the states had any stones they would tell the feds to go pound sand. They have no constitutional authority to regulate firearms period. The states can make there own rules regarding firearms as long as it doesn't conflict with the states constitution.

    Seeing as how the states won't take there authority back from the feds I would say that if someone has paid their debt to society, they should receive their liberties back. Non violent offenders. Violent offenders should be left to rot in prison.
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OutWestSystems View Post
    Your actions have consequences. He choose to be a felon, no one made him do it. He has to live with the consequence of what that means. One of the biggest problems in this country today is this lack of "responsibility for one's actions". His actions put him in that situation, it is now his to live with.
    He was held responsible for those original felonious actions, though. And he was made to pay for them. If he turned out to be recidivist, he got really thumped on. But, after being held responsible, I have a hard time seeing how stripping rights, privileges and responsibilities of full citizenship is constitutional, if only to satisfy our penchant for penalization. Disallowing a person the effective means of defending his own life in deadly situations for the remainder of his days is something having zero to do with the original felonious actions the person committed, it seems to me. Such things are for us, to make us feel better for sticking it to him, not for him. And, at the end of the day, what is it that actually justifies denying any citizen the right to defend his life effectively from here on out, simply because he'd been caught for and made to pay for an earlier, unrelated issue years before?
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OutWestSystems View Post
    Your actions have consequences. He choose to be a felon, no one made him do it. He has to live with the consequence of what that means. One of the biggest problems in this country today is this lack of "responsibility for one's actions". His actions put him in that situation, it is now his to live with.
    Not everyone chooses to be a felon, and it gets easier all the time to get slapped with a felony.

    Example: A friend of mine was planning on picking up his kid from school on the way to the range for our Wed night skeet shooting. I asked him "you'll have your shotguns in the car, right"? He didn't even think about that he was about to commit a felony by doing so.
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    VIP Member Array suntzu's Avatar
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    What would Jefferson do? If they wanted felons to not have weapons I think our brilliant forefathers would have spelled that out in the Constitution.....they did not, just like they did not spell out many things that anti's don't want like hi-cap mag bans and "assualt" weapon bans, and universal background checks.

    Why do felons have to be a difference for many here (ecspecially when talking about non-violent felons)? For most that don't remember it took Federal legislation (Gun COntrol Act 1968) to decide who should be afforded the right to bear arms.
    Fine for those that want the government to decide on who should be fit to bear arms. Someday it may be you in the looking glass. When that happens don't go crying about fairness. At least the felons have served their time. If your issue with violent felons (who BTW some do get rehabilitated) then you should focus your dang energy on getting jails built large enough to hold the true violent offendors for extremely long sentences and force the penal and legal system to do their jobs.

    When a citizen makes mistakes, the legal system suppose to handle it. That is the problem, not letting folks that have been released by the system be put at fault.

    Many folks like to pontificate that gun ownership is a right, not a privelege, but many on this forum and others, by their words and deeds, seem to try to make it a privelege.
    Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?”
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    Distinguished Member Array onacoma's Avatar
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    ^^^What He Said^^^


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    VIP Member Array tdave's Avatar
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    Can a felon possess a firearm? They obviously do. Is this legal status keeping us safer as a society? How many crimes are deterred? How many offenses created without legitimate victim? I do not consider a criminal breaking into a home a victim. Neither do I consider a recurring felon defending his meth lab against other criminals legit. What does recent history show is occurring? View the data with skepticism agenda is afoot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OutWestSystems View Post
    Your actions have consequences. He choose to be a felon, no one made him do it. He has to live with the consequence of what that means. One of the biggest problems in this country today is this lack of "responsibility for one's actions". His actions put him in that situation, it is now his to live with.
    The question is "should there be a distinction between violent crime conviction as opposed to no-violent convictions" and should these felons be stripped of their 2nd amendment rights forever even after serving time and it has been determined that they should be released back into society?

    If you are convicted of income tax evasion, should you be stripped of your 2nd amendment rights forever?

    You went out to dinner with friends, had some wine, after dinner on the way to your car you stumble, bang into a guy's car and the car gets damaged. The owner of the car confronts you and a minor altercation ensues and the car owner pulls a knife and you pull your knife. No one gets hurt but you are both immediately arrested. The trial does not go your way. You are convicted of public intoxication and disorderly conduct. You are now a convicted felon. You are sentenced. You complete your sentence. Should you be stripped of your 2nd amendment rights forever?
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    VIP Member Array Snub44's Avatar
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    ...if the PD charged him, it wasn't a Federal charge...if he wasn't legal under state law to have a gun, bye-bye...it's part of the price you pay for being a felon...

    ...I kinda like OldVet's idea...if the crime wasn't gun-related or violent, let him go with it after his sentence is served, but the Feds'd never sign off on it...and there're more important causes for our State gov't to be fighting for...
    ...he shoulda used a crossbow...
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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    In my opinion. If there rights are restored, then all there rights should be restored. Enough of this picking and choosing.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

    Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means, that you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you......

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array USM1976's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snub44 View Post
    ...if the PD charged him, it wasn't a Federal charge...if he wasn't legal under state law to have a gun, bye-bye...it's part of the price you pay for being a felon...

    ...I kinda like OldVet's idea...if the crime wasn't gun-related or violent, let him go with it after his sentence is served, but the Feds'd never sign off on it...and there're more important causes for our State gov't to be fighting for...
    ...he shoulda used a crossbow...

    Crossbow ? You read the comments under the article ? The defense was legal...the gun possession was illegal.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Array USM1976's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1MoreGoodGuy View Post
    The question is "should there be a distinction between violent crime conviction as opposed to no-violent convictions" and should these felons be stripped of their 2nd amendment rights forever even after serving time and it has been determined that they should be released back into society?

    If you are convicted of income tax evasion, should you be stripped of your 2nd amendment rights forever?

    You went out to dinner with friends, had some wine, after dinner on the way to your car you stumble, bang into a guy's car and the car gets damaged. The owner of the car confronts you and a minor altercation ensues and the car owner pulls a knife and you pull your knife. No one gets hurt but you are both immediately arrested. The trial does not go your way. You are convicted of public intoxication and disorderly conduct. You are now a convicted felon. You are sentenced. You complete your sentence. Should you be stripped of your 2nd amendment rights forever?


    Public Intoxication and Disorderly Conduct are not felonies...BUT, I understand what you're saying...

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