Haven't seen this one yet..what to do with a special needs kid during mugging/assault

This is a discussion on Haven't seen this one yet..what to do with a special needs kid during mugging/assault within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I'm a mom of 3 kids (10,7,5), and I am frequently out in public with them by myself. My 7yr old is autistic, and has ...

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    Member Array ravinlunachick's Avatar
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    Haven't seen this one yet..what to do with a special needs kid during mugging/assault

    I'm a mom of 3 kids (10,7,5), and I am frequently out in public with them by myself. My 7yr old is autistic, and has no danger sense. I have to hold his hand in parking lots, because he will bolt. If a BG approaches me in a parking lot or other public place (thinking of a situation that would provoke me to draw a cw), what should I do with my son? I can't trust that he would get behind me or even run if I told him to. He's also big and strong enough that my 10yr old couldn't hold onto him if he didn't want her to. My other two probably would follow my directions.
    Last edited by ravinlunachick; June 9th, 2014 at 10:17 PM.

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    Member Array LeanHard's Avatar
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    The number 1 thing to do is get your children behind you. Even if you have to "man handle them." If you see a gun push them down if you have to. This is why its importent to practice shooting one handed with both hands. You will need the other to swipe your children behind you or to get them down. You know you are there only means of protection and there only shield if your all in the open. Good question!
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    Your SA must be on top of your game at all times.

    I feel for you in this situation and applaud your strong motherhood instincts, that have gotten you through this far and it sounds as though you are a very smart and "with it chick", to even be cognizant to be asking this.
    Do you, or are you preparing to carry a firearm for protection?

    I would limit the places that would harbor the potential to bring you and yours harm, and try to keep your time out at these locations when you are with your better-half.
    I think if the time arose that would place you in this predicament, your only course of action would be to possibly push him to the side, and take care of the threat, and trust that the children will be alright in the ensuing aftermath.

    I'll say a silent prayer in hopes that such a situation never comes about.
    God Bless you.

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    Senior Member Array Navydude's Avatar
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    One training class I went to put us in a situation where you arrive home and your spouse is hiding in the corner. She then runs up grabs your arm and starts shaking you screaming there is someone in the house with a gun. The trainer does not stop shaking you while you draw and try to keep your gun steady.

    You can shoot but it takes willpower and concentration to get shots on target. It's an eye opener. I practice more one handed shooting now than I use to. Get your kids behind you and more than likely you will only have one hand to shoot with.
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    I have a 34 year old son with special needs when he walks he is holding my hand or in a wheel chair for long distance .When crossing roads or keeping him out of harms way, sometime i use a arm bar to keep him out of something.

    Alot of different options but keeping your children behind and low to the ground is best , good luck to you and your family .

    I will fight to the death for my wife and son and do whatever it takes this is my job and my promise .
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    VIP Member Array Easy8's Avatar
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    Probably suggest a good pepperspray, an use your car alarm. For home defense I would suggest perimeter alarms an maybe a small sturdy dog. There are 1 lb pepper sprays that shoot out 20 plus feet. Just not sure I would recommend having a weapon. Carrying a weapon is a huge undertaking with training an range time. Good luck an I really wish you an yours the best.

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    My 13 year old nephew is autistic, with some pretty serious sensory issues. Loud noises, or even just loud places get him pretty disoriented pretty quickly. If your son has a tendency to bolt, would the sound of a gunshot at close range be enough to make him run? Kids like him can hide and keep quiet very well, sometimes too well, to the point that he won't respond when you call out for him. I've seen it first hand.

    Depending on his situation, pepper spray or a good tazer may be a better option.

    Whatever you decide, good luck.
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    Member Array ravinlunachick's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the helpful replies!

    Oneshot, I do not currently have my CWP, but hope to within the next 6 months or so. I realize that this is most definitely something I will need to carefully consider and plan for. Unfortunately, I seem to attract weirdos in public places (when my husband isn't around, of course). I don't know what it is about me, but I have had some bizarre encounters. I am always alert in public for this reason, and I tend to "read" people well. I realize carrying a weapon brings a tremendous responsibility, and protecting my kids is the primary reason to do so. I intend to train as much as necessary to be sure I can keep us as safe as possible. Becoming comfortable shooting one handed is an excellent idea.

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    Member Array ravinlunachick's Avatar
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    Ianthin, my son isn't really afraid of loud noises in general, but I am sure if he were standing beside me when I fired a gun, he'd be terrified. I *think* that may actually work in my favor, as he doesn't tend to run when scared. He tends to cling. Mostly, his running is due to impulsiveness and a lack of awareness that cars can harm him. He wouldn't be able to recognize a scary BG the way my other kids would, or to pick up on urgency in my voice.

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    Special people care for special needs children. I have no idea of finances or training but a service dog may answer several needs. There is an adoption service for war dogs coming back from the sand box but these dogs are either explosive or war dog. A police dog is taught to grab and hold a limb. War dogs are trained differently. Think long and hard on any decision but sending a dog to bite while you tend to your special young man could buy you time to mitigate the situation.

    I am told by a friend never forget to lock up the dog before you scold the child the bond they share can be very strong.

    Good luck and keep safe.

    Respectfully,
    Bill

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    Distinguished Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    My Aunt had twins in the late 60s. Hers would look at each other and then bolt in opposite directions. She had to put leashes on them to keep them safe. At that time I had never seen kids on a leash, but it was very effective. She took a lot of crap in those days But now its more excepted. I had twins in the late 80s, and till they were old enough to understand about safety I had safety straps on them.[ They are 25 now]. Our youngest granddaughter had a Monkey shaped back pack that its straps all snapped in the center of her back [ where she couldn't reach to release them ] and a tail that could be clipped to mom or dad in a crowd. I cant begin to tell you what to do but these are things that have worked for us. Good luck DR
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    Member Array ravinlunachick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dangerranger View Post
    My Aunt had twins in the late 60s. Hers would look at each other and then bolt in opposite directions. She had to put leashes on them to keep them safe. At that time I had never seen kids on a leash, but it was very effective. She took a lot of crap in those days But now its more excepted. I had twins in the late 80s, and till they were old enough to understand about safety I had safety straps on them.[ They are 25 now]. Our youngest granddaughter had a Monkey shaped back pack that its straps all snapped in the center of her back [ where she couldn't reach to release them ] and a tail that could be clipped to mom or dad in a crowd. I cant begin to tell you what to do but these are things that have worked for us. Good luck DR
    Oh, how I wish a leash were an option for my son! I used them happily with my other two kids, and we even had a monkey one like your granddaughter, but putting one on my son is the fastest way to cause me to have to carry a 55lb screaming bundle of fury. You can't even hide it in the back; he's too smart to fall for that. Otherwise, I'd absolutely use one. :)

    Quote Originally Posted by manolito View Post
    Special people care for special needs children. I have no idea of finances or training but a service dog may answer several needs. There is an adoption service for war dogs coming back from the sand box but these dogs are either explosive or war dog. A police dog is taught to grab and hold a limb. War dogs are trained differently. Think long and hard on any decision but sending a dog to bite while you tend to your special young man could buy you time to mitigate the situation.

    I am told by a friend never forget to lock up the dog before you scold the child the bond they share can be very strong.

    Good luck and keep safe.

    Respectfully,
    Bill
    We've been on a wait list for two years for a local organization that gives service dogs to autistic kids. In that time, my son has bolted and been tapped by a car backing up (the driver heard my screams and stopped; he never saw my son), and he got lost for about 20 horrifying minutes when we were visiting Philadelphia. I swear, those two events took 10 years off my life! To my knowledge, service animals are not trained for protection, so it would be a great advantage if we had a dog that was. I'll look into those veteran dogs. Thanks for the tip!
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    Senior Member Array GentlemanJim's Avatar
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    If you CCW and intend to fight back, DO NOT PLACE YOUR CHILD BEHIND YOU!!!

    You are the target, any bullets that miss or pass through you are going to hit your child.

    If you can't depend on your child running to cover, violently push him to the ground and move away. I repeat, get away from your child if you intend to fight back!

    Violently shoving your child to the ground is going to run counter to your instincts but it is the quickest way to get him out of the line of fire. And it has to be violent lest he grab you and hold on. Bruises and scrapes heal much more quickly than bullet wounds.

    Draw fire away from your family!

    And while you are moving away from your family repeatedly shoot your attacker.

    I hope your children never have to witness such a thing but if everyone goes home in one piece you can sort everything out there.

    Edited to add: You probably will be too occupied to give many directions and your children might be frozen in one place seeing their mother being attacked. You need to sit them down and plan out what everyone is going to do and then you need to realize that they will simply stand there and it is up to you as the adult to get your family through this.

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    Distinguished Member Array Glock2201's Avatar
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    I applaud you for thinking about this the way you have. I don't really have any suggestion other than to learn how to shoot one handed with both hands so you can hold him back with the other hand. You seem to have a very good motherly instinct and I think you might surprise yourself and any BG if the time ever comes when you have to defend yourself and your kids.

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member Array DingBat's Avatar
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    i agree w/ gentleman jim about shoving the kid to the ground. not pretty, or nice. but safest all-around. even to point of learning a few leg sweeps you can execute in case he starts to bolt, or resists your pushing. the war dog is a good idea, but an autistic kid w/no danger sense and a war dog w/bonding issues...just make sure you digest and follow every single letter of the instructions they give you about the dog. and if they don't give detailed instructions (like locking the dog up when scolding kids) make them.

    the rest of your kids you instruct to scatter into the other parked cars. they will come back then called.

    can you practice this? could you even make the getting-on-the-ground part a game for the autisitic one?
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