Scenario: Would you draw on a drawn gun?

This is a discussion on Scenario: Would you draw on a drawn gun? within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; 72 inmates to a pod, some of them criminals. What are the rest of them? In LFI-2, they taught gun retention and disarm techniques. However ...

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Thread: Scenario: Would you draw on a drawn gun?

  1. #31
    Member Array grnzbra's Avatar
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    Sounds like a really interresting jail

    72 inmates to a pod, some of them criminals.
    What are the rest of them?

    In LFI-2, they taught gun retention and disarm techniques. However they prefaced the lesson with the admonition that trying to disarm someone who was pointing a gun at you was just this side of suicide. That being said, the techniques worked very nicely (in terms of Bambi vs Godzilla - since we were using dummy guns we only learned that we could disarm the guy, but not if we could beat the shot) but there were a lot of them. Translation, after spending the week there, one must go home and practice. Having had no training partner in the 4 years since I attended that class, there's no way I would try it now.

    But I would attempt a disarm before I tried to outdraw a drawn gun.
    There's a reason The Sopranos is set in New Jersey.
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  3. #32
    Senior Member Array jdsumner's Avatar
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    Talking

    gr,
    "72 inmates to a pod, some of them criminals."
    Was a semi sarcastic statement. What I meant was even a guy with training and in a situation in which he is surrounded by people who would do him ill will, can probably be in condition low yellow once in a while, or more specifically, have his attention focused on something and may not see an attack coming.

  4. #33
    Member Array grnzbra's Avatar
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    Lenny McGill produced an interresting DVD about dealing with a drawn gun. Using Simunitions, all successful responses involved running. If cover was only a few steps away, running to cover and then drawing was the best solution. But any attempt to just stand there and outdraw the drawn gun would get you shot.

    Suarez International has classes on interactive gunfighting. While I can't tell from the pix and course description if it involves drawing against a drawn gun, it does involve shooting while running because of the idea that standing still is asking to be shot.
    Last edited by grnzbra; April 14th, 2005 at 12:31 PM. Reason: Added Thought
    There's a reason The Sopranos is set in New Jersey.
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  5. #34
    Senior Member Array jdsumner's Avatar
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    Hey gr-
    I've always called it the NIKE principle. Works by placing one foot in front of the other in rapid succession, most always in the direction opposite the drawn gun.

    Dan

  6. #35
    VIP Member Array ExSoldier's Avatar
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    I put this on the other thread by this title, thought I'd weigh in here with the same thoughts.

    I'm an instructor. I try to teach AWARENESS as in the condition levels (white, yellow, orange and red) so that they see trouble before it reaches that point. I also teach layered defensive postures, and encourage carrying nonlethal weapons if your permit system allows as is the case here in Florida. I also encourage a course in combatives (hand to hand) although I'm not qualified to teach that. However I do advocate Ju-Juitsu or Aikido as possibly being amongst the most effective systems for folks who are my age (and not as strong as they once were), or just not into "punches, kicks and other Chuck Norris stuff"

    For me, it would come down to a question of range. Absolutely I understand that in such a situation I'm risking my life and I'm fine with that. Sheepdog mentality, I guess. But speaking as a teacher of psychology and teaching a target group that does include some of the criminal element, I'd have to say that it seems to be getting increasingly rare these days to get robbed and then get left alone. A lot of folks want to see what it "feels" like to kill or hurt somebody real bad even if they tell themselves they're just trying to discourage an eyewitness account to the police or to discourage testimony....

    By "range" I'm thinking distance from me to the attacker and for me I think that "medium range" is the most lethal, IMHO. Just out of arm's reach but too close to seek cover and draw. Further away and I have time to find cover. Contact and I can either sweep gun hand to the outside or pin to the inside as I draw my own weapon and fire from retention.
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  7. #36
    Troll Array heyu's Avatar
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    Uh, why not wait until he leaves,a nd put several between his shoulder blades, go retreive what you should, and leave him where he fell? Do you really think that the cops CARE who shot some pos?

  8. #37
    Member Array Waldo0506's Avatar
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    I would say "If my oatmeal is cold I put some dog in it to make it warm".

    Dude thinks "***?" and takes his mind off the situation for .5 seconds, enough time for me to make my move.

  9. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waldo0506
    I would say "If my oatmeal is cold I put some dog in it to make it warm".

    Dude thinks "***?" and takes his mind off the situation for .5 seconds, enough time for me to make my move.
    LOL, that would probably be worth a try
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  10. #39
    Member Array ibe4glocks's Avatar
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    I never want to go out without trying. I never want to place my fate in the hands of the BG. If I draw and take one or two I still might get a few back into him. I was always taught if a gun or knife is put in your back stomp as hard as you can on the guys foot you are going to break at least one bone in his foot and it might give you time to draw. I just don't like anyone getting my gun, unless they are prying my cold dead fingers from it.
    Courage is fear holding on a minute longer.
    George S. Patton

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