ID'ing the 'attacker' - in the home.

This is a discussion on ID'ing the 'attacker' - in the home. within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Not sure rewiring a breaker box into my bedroom is viable solution, instead I agree that educating all possible family members as to what to ...

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Thread: ID'ing the 'attacker' - in the home.

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array NCHornet's Avatar
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    Not sure rewiring a breaker box into my bedroom is viable solution, instead I agree that educating all possible family members as to what to do if entry needs to made after hours. Most folks have cel phones so a call ahead to say "Dad I'm coming home" would be a great idea. I also agree with having a good flashlight as well as your firearm by your bed. Last but not least a positive ID or lack there of is a must before engaging the threat. I, like other members, have made it well known to my family and friends that entering my home uninvited would be a very, very poor decision.
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  3. #17
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    The dogs seem to sense if it is the wrong person, or wrong car...

    If I hear a key enter the lock all is well...
    If I hear breaking glass or a door being forced open...no more need to identify...
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

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  4. #18
    Senior Member Array bzdog's Avatar
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    You should have a bright flashlight for nighttime IDing purposes. I'd recommend at least a Surefire G2. The G2 is plenty bright to allow positive ID of someone in the dark. Personally, my bedstand light is a Surefire M6 and in addition to positive ID, anyone being lit up with the M6 in the dark is going have a heck of a time seeing afterwords!*.

    At one time, late at night, I heard something outside and looked out the upstairs window of our house to see a car parked in our driveway with a guy in it. In our neighborhood, this is very unusual. For some reason I hadn't put my car in the garage that night. I suspect he was doing a car-prowl. I didn't have my M6 with me at the time, but lit him up from upstairs with my light and he got very startled and took off. Admittedly, I might have done things a bit differently if I were to do it again, but 1) a light as bright as a G2 can effectively light up things, even from a ways away, and 2) it can throw a BG off balance.

    -john


    * Note this doesn't mean they can't shoot you. They can still aim for the source of the light.

  5. #19
    VIP Member Array ExSoldier's Avatar
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    The intruders will be fairly easy to spot: They'll be the ones half eaten by two very protective and large Newfoundland dogs. Okay....if they're not eaten at least they'll be sat upon to be licked to death until I come along to deliver the real thing. Call it the kiss of death?
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  6. #20
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    Does your stepdaughter have a cell phone? It might be a good idea to instruct her to phone ahead instead of arriving unannounced.

    I always phone home if I leave work early. That way I don't startle my wife when I enter. When my elderly mother lived in an apartment nearby, I always phoned from the parking lot of her apartment complex, rather than just let myself in. That way mom would not get startled or scared by hearing someone at the door.

    Ask those you have given keys to to please use their cell phones and not arrive unannounced. That would make the problem of mistaking those with access to the house for intruders mostly go away. Of course, there will always be some unforseen situation in which that advanced call can't be made. In those cases, perhaps they could ring the bell or knock first before entering.

  7. #21
    Senior Member Array kavity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miggy View Post
    One thing absolutely forbidden in my house is sneaking in. My wife tried to pull a Psycho shower scene prank on me once when we were newly wed and she almost had two broken wrists.
    I was staying at my gf's parents house with her this past summer. We were sleeping in 2 seperate rooms, but she decided to sneak into mine to talk or something because she couldn't sleep. Well it was dark in my room and she couldn't see and she sorta fell/grabbed my leg pretty firmly with her hand while I was dead asleep....





    ...my natural reactions kicked in and I kicked her HARD in the face and chest. I felt horrible and so did she, but I guess she won't be doing that again anytime soon. I have also started locking my bedroom door at night. It gives me one more barrier and one more chance to wake up before I get "surprised" while sleeping.

  8. #22
    Member Array buckrod73's Avatar
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    Several years ago when I lived in Memphis a teenage girl got home early and decided to play a prank on her dad. Hid in a closet and when he came down the hall she scared him. He shot her with a 357. He said it never would have happened if the gun had not been in the house. It was not the guns fault, he should have had a plan in place and a family that was gun conscious.

    When I come home I lean in the door and call out to my wife. I will not come on in until she acknowledges she knows it is me. She will shoot me if I don't. Our kids are grown but they know not to come in on Momma without letting her know who it is. We all carry guns and know the dangers.

  9. #23
    Senior Member Array bzdog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckrod73 View Post
    Several years ago when I lived in Memphis a teenage girl got home early and decided to play a prank on her dad. Hid in a closet and when he came down the hall she scared him. He shot her with a 357. He said it never would have happened if the gun had not been in the house. It was not the guns fault, he should have had a plan in place and a family that was gun conscious.
    I thought this is why we have rule #4.

    -john

  10. #24
    Member Array retiredswine's Avatar
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    I am fortunate,.. it's me, the bride, and Abby the Doberman. She is usually the first one alerted to anything unusual and I automatically reach over and touch my wife to make certain she is still with me. Otherwise, it's unidentified and fair game.

  11. #25
    Ex Member Array BikerRN's Avatar
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    OK, it's time to change the rules a bit.
    RULE # 1 Be sure of who/what your target is.
    This may mean using a flashlight or some other method of ID'ing your target. It is your responsibility as the shooter to know what you are shooting at.
    I suggest you take a "Tacital Flashlight" type course. You are not allowed to shoot at targets that are not identified, and you could land yourself in jail if you do that. If you shot a family member, how would you feel? Would your family support you?
    If you don't know who/what your target is and you shoot, then you are a reckless and dangerous individual that doesn't need to own any firearms.

    Biker

  12. #26
    Member Array nonsnob's Avatar
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    I live in a small country town everyone knows everybody else we don't enter anyones house uninvited regardless of this. my children are 6 and 3 so they better not be sneaking around just yet god help me! i work nights so my 75lb shepard takes guard over the house he is a very light sleeper and very protective of his family no one gets within 50 ft of my house without me or the wife knowing. once threat has passed he always does a sweep of the house to check the kids and our room. if threat does persist wife grabs a handfull of gun and the phone cause someones gonna need an ambulance,or a hearse! i think dogs are the best id system i have found at least mine is.but yes always id threat.

  13. #27
    VIP Member Array obxned's Avatar
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    Dogs will give you more time to make the ID.
    "If we loose Freedom here, there's no place to escape to. This is the Last Place on Earth!" Ronald Reagan

  14. #28
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    I keep a flashlight at my bedside. It's just me and my daughter here ( 18 ). She has a curfew , so I know when to expect her. If she's coming home early, she calls me. She knows how daddy is. When she goes out of town to college ( 2 years ), I told her never to come home and surprise me.

  15. #29
    Member Array PAExplorer's Avatar
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    I have a big problem because I do not have central air, so I have a noisy window unit in my bedroom. Someone could use a sawzall to cut my front door down and I probably wouldn't hear it. So, in addition to motion sensor lighting outside the house, I got an alarm with motion sensors for each room in the house. They are wired to a small pannel in my bedroom, not the alarm system itself. There is a standard system on all the doors and windows which would actually set off the sirens and and call the police, but if somebody were somehow able to get into the house without setting off the alarm, a light chime would sound in my bedroom at the first sign of motion and the pannel next to my bed would tell me which room the motion was in. I can either press the panic button on the pannel which would alert the police or track the motion via the portable pannel and investigate with my hand cannon. It will track motion in more than one room simultaniosly if there is more than one intruder. Both the alarm system and motion system are on trickle charged battery power and digital cellular phone service in case the land line was cut. I'm also about 1000 feet from the police station. I've got a TLR-2 on my nightstand gun, so it will shed light on the subject as well as a laser if the subject is not supposed to be there. I zeroed the laser for close distances. I would hate to have to use the sights with crusties in my eyes! Anyone who is supposed to be in my house can enter and turn off the alarm and sensors without disturbing me via a secret process. Also, if someone were staying over I have a switch I show them so they can turn off the sensors if they wish to go downstairs for water or something duriing the night. However, guests don't always remember to do that (or turn them back on) so I'm extra vigilant when I have guests so there aren't any issues. Basically, if you mess with my house, you're screwed.
    Never criticize a man until you've walked a mile in his shoes...that way, when you criticize him, you're a mile away and you have his shoes.

  16. #30
    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P95Carry View Post
    My step son is in the Navy - he won't be visiting until a month's time. My step daughter is with her fiance to be, and living elsewhere.

    So - in theory at least, anyone in our house is not an invited guest!

    However ... were my step daughter to, for some reason .. appear in the early hours - and come in (she has a key) ........ the last thing I'd want is to see her as an aggressor and start shooting! Hopefully she'd call out announcing her presence but there is this small concern about the legitimate visitor.

    If however the ''guest'' is uninvited - there is that short spell where ID'ing the person is probably ideal if not maybe a wise move ......... certainly before shots are fired. However - too tardy and the result might be incoming from someone with malicious intent.

    The concern is premature action ....... how do you folks handle this?

    He or she is the one with the two pissed off dogs hanging off of them

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