Had to draw my gun---on a dog - Page 3

Had to draw my gun---on a dog

This is a discussion on Had to draw my gun---on a dog within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by SleepingZ Do you agree that an animal can sense fear in us??? Oh most defiantly and they can sense that when a ...

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Thread: Had to draw my gun---on a dog

  1. #31
    VIP Member Array Sheldon J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SleepingZ View Post

    Do you agree that an animal can sense fear in us???
    Oh most defiantly and they can sense that when a dog growls at me my only thought is to grab it by the throat and rip it's head off. When facing a aggressive dog my primary thought is to kill and not fear, experience has taught me they sense this and they show fear and back down very fast.
    "The sword dose not cause the murder, and the maker of the sword dose not bear sin" Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac 11th century


  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by SleepingZ View Post

    Do you agree that an animal can sense fear in us??? I know I was glad that I had decided to drop my gun in my pocket. I made the mistake of leaving the cell phone in my pick-up, but who was I going to call anyway.
    Good job - you're lucky.

    Yes - they smell fear and lack of confidence. No doubt.


    The tyrant dies and his rule is over, the martyr dies and his rule begins. ― The Journals of Kierkegaard

  3. #33
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    Dogs know

    Quote Originally Posted by SleepingZ View Post
    Do you agree that an animal can sense fear in us??? I

    All ends well.
    I have owned several dogs. They can detect fear, and I think they also have a sixth sense of when someone is a BG. I'm not suggesting you are a BG, or that the dog thought you were. I'm just saying that I have had dogs who were darn good judges of character.

    I have a neighbor lady who lives at the end of my cul-de-sac, however that's spelled. For whatever reason my dog would go nuts at the sight of her. What is interesting is this woman was married to one of my co-workers, and she had a poor reputation among the gossips at work. Dawg hater her guts, and I don't know why.

    More interestingly, my sister and mom once came to stay with us for a few days. Sister can't stand dogs. Apparently "dawg" couldn't stand her either. And dawg showed me how she felt by promptly peeing and crapping all over our utility room during my sister's first night at our house. I was up at 4 AM cleaning with a wet vac and Lysol.

    Dogs know. They are good judges of character.

    And too, I have had repair people the dog simply would not let up our driveway. One guy I remember, dawg would have torn him apart if I let her loose. I'm convinced the dog knew something about that guy I didn't.

  4. #34
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    I agree, I think there is something about a person that will "creep" a dog out sometimes. They do seem to be good judges of character. I used to know a guy who was exceptionally tall, he was a good guy and model citizen, but dogs freaked out when he came around. I think his height, and it being different from the norm, set off an alarm in the dogs mind.

    I don't think their assessment is right 100% of the time, but I pay close attention to their instinct.
    Turn the election's in 2014 to a "2A Revolution". It will serve as a 1994 refresher not to "infringe" on our Second Amendment. We know who they are now.........SEND 'EM HOME. Our success in this will be proportional to how hard we work to make it happen.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by ppkheat View Post
    I agree, I think there is something about a person that will "creep" a dog out sometimes. They do seem to be good judges of character. I used to know a guy who was exceptionally tall, he was a good guy and model citizen, but dogs freaked out when he came around. I think his height, and it being different from the norm, set off an alarm in the dogs mind.

    I don't think their assessment is right 100% of the time, but I pay close attention to their instinct.
    This is true, I have had and known dogs that hated anyone with a beard, had a hat on or even glasses. I've had more than one dog who hated people of color, and I have a black friend who's dog isnt particularly fond of white people. Who knows why or what goes on in a dogs mind, but the do have their prejudices just like humans do.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  6. #36
    Ex Member Array BikerRN's Avatar
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    After reading all these post I'm suprised nobody has mentioned another way to take out a dog that is attacking.

    We have had everything from "Doggie Treats" to guns. Personally my favored method, if the dog is already attacking, is a knife. With a blade there is less chance of missing your target and injuring innocent bystanders.

    If I know I'm going to be bitten I will give the dog my support side arm and draw my blade. The reason I opt for this is, less chance of a ricochet or harming a third party.

    If the dog hasn't attacked, and is more of a nusience then OC often times works great. I've used it a couple of times. I guess it depends on the situation what I will use. The thing is, make sure you have enough tools in your "toolbox" so that you have options.

    Options are a good thing.

    Biker

  7. #37
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    Just kick the S$#%^ out of the dog right under there jaw. If that doesn't work knock them in the head with a hammer.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by bacchus99 View Post
    Just kick the S$#%^ out of the dog right under there jaw. If that doesn't work knock them in the head with a hammer.
    Hmm. I'll have to add a hammer to my everyday carry list.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  9. #39
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    If I know I'm going to be bitten I will give the dog my support side arm and draw my blade. The reason I opt for this is, less chance of a ricochet or harming a third party.
    I dont know about that.
    The only thing I would offer up to a dog that wants to taste me is a 230 grain Golden Saber.
    I would rather stand against the cannons of the wicked than against the prayers of the righteous.


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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon J View Post
    Oh most defiantly and they can sense that when a dog growls at me my only thought is to grab it by the throat and rip it's head off. When facing a aggressive dog my primary thought is to kill and not fear, experience has taught me they sense this and they show fear and back down very fast.
    When I was stationed in Germany, I used to do some work with the K-9s. If one of the dogs ever tried to be dominant over us, we would just bow up to them, and once they see they are not the ones in control, they usually back down. I say usually though because we had this one crazy dog, Max, that really didn't listen to anyone. Was dumber than a brick, and the size of a small horse. Guess you just need to be able to read the dog too, and try to predict wether or not he is going to be submissive.

    Another thing about dogs recognizing weapons, I think is like a child. If they are around them enough, not just hunting hounds, they know what they are capable of and don't want to be on the business end. I had a mut growing up that would go outside with my brothers and I when we shot our pellet rifles. He understood what the gun was, and kept out from in front of us.

    Just my .02 cents.



    Dave

  11. #41
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    Living in Leesburg, VA in the 60's, I had a dog who hated black people. He was certainly NOT taught this but would go OFF on anyone black he saw. This was a time of racial transition (the movie theater still had a blacks-in-balcony-only rule and we had a whites and blacks highschool) and it embarrassed me greatly.

    I had a dog I got at 1 year old (from the pound) and he absolutely knew what guns were, when I would get out a handgun he'd get really nervous. If I pointed it at him, he would DUCK and SHAKE! I only did this once, he was the perfect dog otherwise.

  12. #42
    Senior Member Array bzdog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tardola View Post
    Living in Leesburg, VA in the 60's, I had a dog who hated black people. He was certainly NOT taught this but would go OFF on anyone black he saw.
    I think sometimes dogs, much like people, are suspicious of people that are different than what they know. So for example, if the dog grows up and never sees anyone with a beard, and then some guy with a beard comes up to the dog, they are likely to be upset.

    So if the dog didn't interact with black people up close, this might fit.

    This is one of the reasons you want to expose your puppy to as many different things and people while they are young. Kids, old people, etc.

    -john

  13. #43
    Senior Member Array Sergeant Mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SammyIamToday View Post
    Definitely recommend using dog sized targets when training your shooting skills. Not all the time, but odds are more in favour of a dog attack than a human attack.
    Take a gallon milk or water jug and fill it with water. Dye the water if you like. Tie one end of about a 50-foot rope to the jug's handle.

    Put the jug about 40 feet in front of you, with the rope running past you on the ground.

    Have a friend grab the rope and run as fast as he can, pulling the jug toward you on the ground.

    This simulates a charging dog.

    Good luck. Chances are, your jug will survive the first couple of exercises intact.

  14. #44
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    S.Mac: I was going to try the water filled milk-jug exercise while hanging it in a tree to represent a moving BG. I was going to hang it about chest high and give it a push, then try to hit it while it was swinging.

    Thanks to all posters, a lot of interesting info. I am going to have to keep some doggy treats in the pick-up.. Sometimes I have snacks for myself along and usually just share them with the dogs.

  15. #45
    Distinguished Member Array Paymeister's Avatar
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    DON'T shoot if an unprovoked bite - for two weeks

    Off-topic and long (apologies), but important information:

    Quote Originally Posted by BIG E View Post
    ...that dog would have been on my hit list after he got you the first time.Never mind the second time or after biting me. ...
    ...A dog comes out of it's yard or into mine and bites my kid and that is his ***. There will not be a second time. ...
    ...That dog would have long gotten itself disappeared long before he had the change to do more harm....
    ...If it was my dog that went out into the street and attacked a little girl... biting her in the face, it would be shot. I would invite her father to watch. ...
    Applause for your grasp of reality: protection of family and untrustworthiness of dog and such. And for your selflessness - you would be willing to do the deed with your own dog, too. I had to put down my favorite black lab: when he was old he growled at my wife when she attempted to get him off our bed = more aggressive behavior later = Bang.

    However... and this is a BIG POINT I hope everyone hears: my wife provoked an attack (challenge for our bed) and the OP did, too (entered with no owner present). An *unprovoked* attack (dog comes out into street), however, *could* be evidence of rabies. Shooting the dog will remove the ability for Animal Control to do the test... and will require the kid to go through the rabies shots. It isn't the horror story it was (it's three "no reaction" shots in the arm instead of 20 in the belly), but it will cost you two or three grand. I was the guy who made the 'treat' or 'don't treat' decisions for the health department, and rabies is a disease you REALLY - I mean *REALLY REALLY* don't want your kid to get (see YouTube if you aren't sure - I doubt if even the worst badarses here would be keen on watching that kid die).

    Better to wait for two weeks: if the dog is still alive, you KNOW he wasn't transmitting rabies at the time of the bite. (Biology lesson: the virus kills less than two weeks after it begins to be present in the saliva.)

    If the dog is dead (or can't be found), you still have time to treat. In a head wound the timetable changes; we would have killed the dog and tested the brain forthwith. But with non-face bites, we would send Animal Control to the house and put the animal under confinement for two weeks. If the dog was OK on their return, the kid didn't need the shots.

    I can certainly imagine expressing my concerns to the owner, and I could imagine their dog "running off and not coming back" a few weeks later, too.

    Best tactics suggest avoiding the situation (for OP; the kids tried by staying in the street). If the dog is charging, the decision is easy. The best tactics for an after-the-fact issue may also be as decisive. But, please, don't mess with the diagnostic procedure for possible rabies in an unprovoked bite if at all possible.

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