What goes into a family plan?

This is a discussion on What goes into a family plan? within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I keep hearing talk of having a plan should you hear a bump in the night or approached in a parking lot, etc. I would ...

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Thread: What goes into a family plan?

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array ExactlyMyPoint's Avatar
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    What goes into a family plan?

    I keep hearing talk of having a plan should you hear a bump in the night or approached in a parking lot, etc.

    I would like to put together one for my family but I do not even know where to start. I do not know how confidential a family plan might be, but I would like to hear some plans others have to at least get me started.
    Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse or Rapture....whichever comes first.

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    Distinguished Member Array sniper58's Avatar
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    You will want to discuss the importance of "what if" scenarios and appropriate response. Code words, signal horns, etc. should be part of your discussion. Fire safety and escape is another consideration as with any disaster (tornado, hurricane, etc.). Who has what responsibility, who knows where to stay and how long to stay there (what's your "all clear" signal), where does everyone unite after the all clear has been given......it's not that different from stuff you've done/practiced in previous jobs. The difference is the stakes are much higher with your family.

    Just like shooting, you all will need to practice your plan so when it does hit the fan, you are all better prepared.
    Tim
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    Senior Member Array f8lranger4x4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sniper58 View Post
    Just like shooting, you all will need to practice your plan so when it does hit the fan, you are all better prepared.
    +1 to that.

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    Member Array Hoot's Avatar
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    Although I am now retired, I spent several years as the security manager for a nuclear plant. Much of my time was devoted to constructing, testing, and implementing contingency plans.

    Start by defining the threat: wolf at the door, fire, chemical spill, flood, blizzard, kidnapping, mudslide, tornado, hurricane, power outages, civil unrest, identity theft, a medical threat, etc. You should have a plan for every plausable threat you can think of. It should be on paper and it should be detailed. This isn't being fearful; this isn't being paranoid; it is being intelligent.

    Determine what you want to protect, family, property, etc. List your priorities. I know your family comes first, but is there anything else that it is important for you to protect? Don't wait for the emergency to decide. Identify it in the plan.

    Next for each contigency identify everything you can do to prevent it from happening. You can do a great deal to prevent fires, home invasion, and many medical emergencies, but you can't prevent some other types of calamities. If you can't do anything to prevent the contigency, then what can you do to mitigate its effect? Preventive and mitigating measures might cost you a little money. You are likely to discover there are things that you should have but don't have. And things that you should do but don't do.

    Be sure to include an analysis of your situation for each threat contingency. How does your geography impact the plan? Your weather? Is where you live a liability or an asset. How long until you can expect help from the authorities, fire, police, emergency squad, etc.? Can or will your neighbors help? How near are you to the interstate? To the hospital? How many ways can you get to or from your house? How is your house designed, does it help or hurt your chances? What kind of landscaping, does it matter? How is your own health, your family's health? Does this call for special considerations?

    Next you must plan what to do if you must actively implement the contigency.
    There will be sub-sets under this because you must consider the situation when you are at home, when you're not at home, when the kids are in school, when your wife is at work, and all the other permutations. You must figure what each member of the family is to do. You must coordinate everybody's actions. You must have a communication plan, a possible rally point, etc.

    Then you shoot holes in your plan. Look for all the things that could mess up the plan. Then patch the holes and write contingencies for the contengencies. In short, have alternates that you can go to. You don't want to try to figure out a back-up plan after the SHTF.

    Next you should test your plan to the degree possible. If you have kids in an upstairs bedroom and your plan calls for them to go out a window with a rope ladder in case of fire, you want to know that they can do it safely - before you have a fire.

    Putting together your contingency plans will be a lot of work. It can be fun though, and you want the whole family to help. Kids will enjoy it if their brains haven't been fried by rap and hip hop. You'll feed a lot better when you know that you are as prepared as you can be for about anything that can happen.

    Next you'll want to do a personal security plan for each member of the family. Do an analysis first. Is there anything that makes you a particularly inviting target? If so what would be possible motives? Using myself as an example, I'm an old man. To most thugs age would be interpreted as weakness. I live in a relatively isolated area. Thugs would think no neighbors to see and tell. I couldn't expect authorities or other help to arrive in less than forty-five minutes. There are woods all around the house affording hiding places. People in the area think I have money. I have a large and valuable gun collection. I have a young and beautiful wife. I have few visitors. My house can be reached as easily by water as by land. In short, I am a great target. My wife is a great target. Am I worried? Naw, I got it covered.

    The reason you need to do an analysis on yourself and family is because it will help you determine your level of vunerability, whether you are likely to be a selected target with a specific motive in mind or a random target. If you are a selected target your adversary will try to carefully plan his attack. If you are a random target there is likely to be little planning involved. You may simply be a target of convenience or opportunity. Your assailant won't know who you are and won't care. In either case your task is to construct obstacles for your opponents. The better you understand who they might be, the better you can plan your obstacles.

    Next look at your daily activities. Do you always leave the house each morning at the same time and return at the same time in the evening? Do you always drive the same route? Do you park in the same place each day? Does your wife? Your children? Analyze your daily activities and try to determine where the risk is high and where it is low and what sort of risk you are dealing with.

    You already know about situational awareness. Does your wife or children? Does your wife know the potentially dangerous areas in her workplace and why they are dangerous for her? Does she know where to park and how to park? Does she know how to approach her vehicle? Does the understand the possible threats? Does she know if she is being followed? If she does know, does she know what to do in that case? Does she know where to walk on a side walk? Does she know how to identify a possible threat on the street? Does she know how to carry her purse? And what sort of threats might the kids face? Do they know what to do if there is a shooter at school? Do they know how to avoid a kidnapper or a molester? How do they deal with the junior thug in their classroom? How do they deal with their friends who offer them a pill or a joint? Hell, they are even at risk with the priest it would seem.

    Well, this should be enough to set you in the right direction. Plans are a good thing. Remember there are no emergencies for those who are prepared, only difficulties, and they can be minimized.

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array glock27mark's Avatar
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    id bet most people dont have a plan,they just take everything for granted.
    (SHERIFF BUFORD T. JUSTICE) "what the hell is
    the world coming too"

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  7. #6
    VIP Member Array ExactlyMyPoint's Avatar
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    Great reply Hoot. Thanks.
    Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse or Rapture....whichever comes first.

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    VIP Member Array goldshellback's Avatar
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    Good reply Hoot!

    You gave the best 'Nuc" answer.......

    Being in the nuclear field you have to cover ALL bases, Hoot did a good job.

    I'll throw in my 2 cents from my standpoint as a family man who works on, in, and around nuclear 'stuff'.....although I skipped going to Rickover University in my training.

    You make the rough draft of the plan first, cover contingencies, and liberly sprinkel with 'Murphy's Law'.

    A basic outline for my family in the event of a hurricane. I stay. I'm AD military and involved with base physical security/force protection (see nuclear 'stuff' above ). Wife MUST grab BOB (bug-out-box), kids, extra NECESSARY gear and supplies, load up all in the 4x4 that has a fully topped off gas tank, and 'hawl booty' to one of several predetermined "safe points" via an already clearly marked route.
    "Safe points" were picked with the route a hurricane "may/might" travel over our area, etc, etc.

    In Portland your not gonna need much in the way of a hurricane evac plan, but you get the point.

    My current "bump in da night" plan is written in sand and very fluid. My previous BITN (Bump In The Night) was 'written' in granit and to be followed without hesition or question. A very brief "Readers Digest" explanition.......My wife's ex......alcoholic, drug addic, VERY abusive, and capable of ANYTHING at ANY time. His several, violent attempts to 'return to his kids' forced a plan to be hatched 'if ' he were to try again. A key word ID'ed the plan's activation and actions taken....immediately move to safe-room, locking only two doors to the room behind (layered security) with cell phone AND house phone AND mom with my 20 gauge coach gun. Pass all info to dispatch (911)while maintaining positive control of weapon and inner-room situation.

    This plan was placed into action twice, first while I was deployed, second, the one time I left to get one item from the store to finish cooking supper.....he'd been watching apparently......I returned to him trying to get in. He had my stepson's bat, I had .40 P229. He bailed before cops arrived but realized confronting me would not have been good for him (his only sober thought that day I believe).

    Bottom line, our plan worked. We practiced it and when it HAD to be used by the wife and young children, it worked....flawlessly!

    Every situation is different , fluid, and dynamic. Keep your plan simple and easy to excute. Practice it so all involved, including neighbors if necessary, can execute it when needed.
    "Just getting a concealed carry permit means you haven't commited a crime yet. CCP holders commit crimes." Daniel Vice, senior attorney for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, quoted on Fox & Friends, 8 Jul, 2008

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  9. #8
    VIP Member Array matiki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoot View Post
    Although I am now retired, I spent several years as the security manager for a nuclear plant. Much of my time was devoted to constructing, testing, and implementing contingency plans.

    Start by defining the threat: wolf at the door, fire, chemical spill, flood, blizzard, kidnapping, mudslide, tornado, hurricane, power outages, civil unrest, identity theft, a medical threat, etc. You should have a plan for every plausable threat you can think of. It should be on paper and it should be detailed. This isn't being fearful; this isn't being paranoid; it is being intelligent.

    Determine what you want to protect, family, property, etc. List your priorities. I know your family comes first, but is there anything else that it is important for you to protect? Don't wait for the emergency to decide. Identify it in the plan.

    Next for each contigency identify everything you can do to prevent it from happening. You can do a great deal to prevent fires, home invasion, and many medical emergencies, but you can't prevent some other types of calamities. If you can't do anything to prevent the contigency, then what can you do to mitigate its effect? Preventive and mitigating measures might cost you a little money. You are likely to discover there are things that you should have but don't have. And things that you should do but don't do.

    Be sure to include an analysis of your situation for each threat contingency. How does your geography impact the plan? Your weather? Is where you live a liability or an asset. How long until you can expect help from the authorities, fire, police, emergency squad, etc.? Can or will your neighbors help? How near are you to the interstate? To the hospital? How many ways can you get to or from your house? How is your house designed, does it help or hurt your chances? What kind of landscaping, does it matter? How is your own health, your family's health? Does this call for special considerations?

    Next you must plan what to do if you must actively implement the contigency.
    There will be sub-sets under this because you must consider the situation when you are at home, when you're not at home, when the kids are in school, when your wife is at work, and all the other permutations. You must figure what each member of the family is to do. You must coordinate everybody's actions. You must have a communication plan, a possible rally point, etc.

    Then you shoot holes in your plan. Look for all the things that could mess up the plan. Then patch the holes and write contingencies for the contengencies. In short, have alternates that you can go to. You don't want to try to figure out a back-up plan after the SHTF.

    Next you should test your plan to the degree possible. If you have kids in an upstairs bedroom and your plan calls for them to go out a window with a rope ladder in case of fire, you want to know that they can do it safely - before you have a fire.

    Putting together your contingency plans will be a lot of work. It can be fun though, and you want the whole family to help. Kids will enjoy it if their brains haven't been fried by rap and hip hop. You'll feed a lot better when you know that you are as prepared as you can be for about anything that can happen.

    Next you'll want to do a personal security plan for each member of the family. Do an analysis first. Is there anything that makes you a particularly inviting target? If so what would be possible motives? Using myself as an example, I'm an old man. To most thugs age would be interpreted as weakness. I live in a relatively isolated area. Thugs would think no neighbors to see and tell. I couldn't expect authorities or other help to arrive in less than forty-five minutes. There are woods all around the house affording hiding places. People in the area think I have money. I have a large and valuable gun collection. I have a young and beautiful wife. I have few visitors. My house can be reached as easily by water as by land. In short, I am a great target. My wife is a great target. Am I worried? Naw, I got it covered.

    The reason you need to do an analysis on yourself and family is because it will help you determine your level of vunerability, whether you are likely to be a selected target with a specific motive in mind or a random target. If you are a selected target your adversary will try to carefully plan his attack. If you are a random target there is likely to be little planning involved. You may simply be a target of convenience or opportunity. Your assailant won't know who you are and won't care. In either case your task is to construct obstacles for your opponents. The better you understand who they might be, the better you can plan your obstacles.

    Next look at your daily activities. Do you always leave the house each morning at the same time and return at the same time in the evening? Do you always drive the same route? Do you park in the same place each day? Does your wife? Your children? Analyze your daily activities and try to determine where the risk is high and where it is low and what sort of risk you are dealing with.

    You already know about situational awareness. Does your wife or children? Does your wife know the potentially dangerous areas in her workplace and why they are dangerous for her? Does she know where to park and how to park? Does she know how to approach her vehicle? Does the understand the possible threats? Does she know if she is being followed? If she does know, does she know what to do in that case? Does she know where to walk on a side walk? Does she know how to identify a possible threat on the street? Does she know how to carry her purse? And what sort of threats might the kids face? Do they know what to do if there is a shooter at school? Do they know how to avoid a kidnapper or a molester? How do they deal with the junior thug in their classroom? How do they deal with their friends who offer them a pill or a joint? Hell, they are even at risk with the priest it would seem.

    Well, this should be enough to set you in the right direction. Plans are a good thing. Remember there are no emergencies for those who are prepared, only difficulties, and they can be minimized.
    +1
    This is how we do it on our Protective Services Team.

    One of the most overlooked areas is the greater good. It's up to you to decide how you approach this... do you share with your family or keep it to yourself. If the BG has one of your kids do you secure the others first or engage? It's very easy for us in P.S., but at home, I'm wrestling with how to deal with it myself. I'm paid to protect one person before all others, at home my priorities are quite different, I want to protect everyone but realize that I may not be able to in all circumstances.
    "Wise people learn when they can; fools learn when they must." - The Duke of Wellington

  10. #9
    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    Good post Hoot.
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