The Tactical Reload ~ For Real Life ?

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Thread: The Tactical Reload ~ For Real Life ?

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    Question The Tactical Reload ~ For Real Life ?

    Retentive Reloading...Recharging With Retention ~ Not For Me. My Magazines Are Always Hitting The Floor/Dirt In Any Real Life FireFight. On the street I personally will carry 4 extra magazines before I ever try to ingrain a Tactical Reload into my feeble brain.
    What Say You?

    Read (below) & then please let your Inner Monkey make a comment.

    "OK, I admit it. I giggled a little. At least I managed to keep from laughing out loud.

    Despite hype to the contrary, IDPA is no closer to "tactical reality" than bull's-eye shooting. That's because of a simple fact pointed out to me by the great Jim Cirillo, who, heaven knows, is one of the few people qualified to comment on shooting people professionally and who happened to shoot on my squad in the first big national invitational IDPA match. "Notice anything about the targets?" Jim asked me.

    "Plain old cardboard," I said.

    "That's right," said the old gunfighter. "Not a damn one of 'em is shooting back."

    This is the part of the article where I tell you my credentials as a "Tactical Demon of Darkness, Kill-'Em-All Operator Dude," except that I don't have any. That's right--I'm probably one of only 10 people in the firearms business who was never a SEAL, a member of a special-ops team, an "operator" of any sort, a commander of a SWAT team, a bodyguard for royalty or at the very least a highly decorated undercover officer in narcotics/gang/any other scary-sounding venue. Sorry.

    I am, however, something of an expert in the arcane field of high-stress decision-making, a distinction I earned in more than a decade of doing relatively--and sometimes extremely--dumb things for money. Cave diving, climbing big mountains, pitching kayaks off waterfalls, river surfing (trust me, skip this one), running serious whitewater, hang-gliding, parasailing, skydiving, downhill mountain-bike racing, ice climbing--you name it. If the fee was right, I was your boy. You become very focused on your training, and your training becomes very focused on what keeps you breathing.

    Yes, the "real vs. game" debate has been going on for a long time (I assume the Romans had something similar going on about sword-fighting), and it would be nothing more than angels dancing on the head of a pin except for one central problem. Recall our water-cooler conversation: "At least I'll be ready if I ever have to defend myself with a gun."

    Unlike Baskin-Robbins, in the world of high-stress decision-making, there are only a few flavors: I know how to do this; I don't know how to do this; I think I know how to do this but really don't; I don't think I know how to do this but really do.

    "Do know how" and "Don't know how" are pretty straightforward. So is the last option since in reality it's the same as "Don't know how." The problem comes when, as one of my early mountaineering instructors was fond of saying, "Your mind makes bets your body can't cover." You think you know what you need to do and how to do it, but when the proverbial balloon goes up, you're left wondering in those closing minutes of your life what just happened.

    Well, you've just discovered the difference between playing a game, albeit a very fun game, and training. Let me be more specific. Let's talk about IDPA's greatest shibboleth, the tactical reload.

    Ingenious Solution to a NonExistent Problem

    The practical shooting sports started out practical and became less so, causing a split in the ranks. IDPA was born to guarantee a shooting sport that focused on carry guns as opposed to finely tuned "raceguns." So far, so good. IDPA was also a reaction to the direction the other practical sports had headed--complex, athletically oriented stages with round counts in the bazillions. IDPA's founders vowed to "keep it real."

    Now here's where things get sticky. IDPA's simplified, reality-based stages of fire were very good things as was its focus on truly concealable handguns carried concealed and forcing competitors to really utilize cover. However, IDPA also began filling up with all manner of flotsam and jetsam under the guise of "tactical reality."

    Enter the tactical reload. As explained in the IDPA Handbook, a tactical reload is simply topping off your blaster during a lull in the fight, retaining whatever unfired ammunition that remains in case you need it later. It's actually one of three reloads recognized by the organization, the other two being a reload from slide lock and "reload with retention," which IDPA defines as dropping the spent magazine into your hand and putting it in your pocket, then drawing the fully charged magazine and inserting it in the gun. The tactical reload is preferred, according to the rulebook, because it leaves the shooter with a one-shot gun for the shortest period of time.

    What's missing here is the typical "speed" reload as popularized and refined by IPSC shooters: drop empty mag, grab loaded mag, stuff new mag in gun. This omission is both intentional and considered. According to the powers-that-be in IDPA, there was "no conceivable situation" in the real world that would justify speed-loading a pistol that was not in slide-lock, empty. If you say so...

    In fact, the whole definition of "reload with retention" is designed to keep competitors from doing the obvious and fastest thing, which is speed-reloading the gun, dropping the partially loaded magazine on the ground, then picking it up when leaving cover. Also, by making the "reload with retention" clunky and slow, it makes the tactical reload look better. Not surprisingly, the tactical reload behind cover has become the preferred--i.e., specified--reload in IDPA competition. Here's how it is supposed to work, courtesy of Walt Rauch's book Practically Speaking: An Illustrated Guide to the Game, the Guns and Gear of IDPA:

    "Method A. When I bring the fresh magazine to the gun, I eject the partially filled magazine into my off-hand and capture it with my palm and last two fingers (then stow it in a pocket to retain the remaining rounds).

    "Method B. Some schools teach that when you have the replacement magazine at the gun, you shift this magazine so that it is now protruding from between your middle and third fingers. Then you catch the partially empty magazine with your palm, forefinger and middle finger and insert the fresh magazine."

    Now that we know how it's supposed to work, let's take a look at the tactical reload through the eyes of our ever-present companion, the Inner Monkey.

    MEET YOUR INNER MONKEY
    We are truly the children of the ancient killer apes, blessed with an "operating system" that has quite literally given us the world. Our operating system, that set of software routines and their associated actions intended to keep us alive, was designed for a very different world than the one we live in now. Our original predators had really big teeth and us on the dinner menu, and our primary stopping-power issues revolved around the best hardwood for bludgeons. Despite a change of milieu, our Inner Monkey--IM, for short--is still peeking around the corners of our mind, looking for sabre-tooths and dire wolves, and we have the appropriate set of hard-wired reactions for just such problems.

    For example, when threatened, we focus on the threat, our IM jumping up and down and pointing at the thing that wants to kills us. In this case, focus means much more than "pay close attention to." A whole series of mental and physical reactions crank up; all our senses narrow down, focusing on the threat. (You know about tunnel vision, auditory exclusion, the "slowing" of time effect, etc., right? If you carry a gun, you'd better.) We lose fine motor control as a whole pharmacy of drugs is launched into our bloodstream to better prepare us to either run like hell or attack.

    Ralph Mroz, author of Defensive Shooting for Real-Life Encounters and one of the most thoughtful commentators on the current state of self-defense training, calls this the "startle effect." We monkeys startle. Which leads us to the first rule of training for high-stress decision-making: You can't beat the operating system, the IM. Not ever.


    At its best, the tactical reload is a Rube Goldberg collection of fine motor movements. Don't believe me? In the course of your average day, how many things do you catch by grabbing with your palm and last two fingers? Or with your palm, forefinger and middle finger? The short answer is none.

    Tell yourself over and over again that you're going to catch a ball using only your palm and a couple of fingers, practice as much as you want, then have someone throw a Nerf ball at your face, really hard. Your IM overrides your conscious thought, and you catch the ball with your entire hand because that's what the hand is designed to do, and it's what we've been doing for the last million years or so.



    The more any action runs counter to our design parameters, the more we have to think about that action in order to accomplish it. The common answer to this is practice more; heck, there are even people who juggle running chain saws, so anything is possible. Two points here from my experience: In training for dangerous, potentially lethal situations, one of the biggest challenges was to never train an action that went directly against our IM because that training would fail under stress. Instead, we learned to break down an activity into its component parts, break down those component parts even further to their fundamental actions, then train from the ground up. Fundamental actions can be defined as "things monkeys do."

    A quick, simple example: I did some dives on deep wrecks, outside the bounds of recreational scuba. Several of those wrecks were covered with old fishing nets, making them death traps for both sea life and visiting divers. So the prudent diver always carried a knife, which the prudent diver practiced getting to from constrained positions.

    And was that knife a big, honking thing strapped to my ankle like in James Bond movies? Nope, my knives were small, razor-sharp blades designed to cut webbing and zip-tied to my scuba harness just below shoulder level. A reflex, high-stress reaction--crossing my arms over my chest--puts both hands on the knives.



    The major reason that speed reloads have been taken to amazing levels--sub-one-second reloads!--by top competitors is that the speed reload is built on a "monkey" movement of bringing the hands together. Try it: Close your eyes, and attempt to applaud. Wow! If you're like most primates, you were able to do it the first time. The speed reload builds on that fundamental movement.

    BUT WAIT, IT GETS WORSE
    OK, the tactical reload is a bio-mechanically unsound technique, utilizing a nonfundamental series of fine motor movements that are virtually guaranteed to fail under high-stress conditions. But the tactical reload has even more problems. For a start, as Walt Rauch notes in his excellent book, the tactical reload probably won't work if you have small hands or are using a double-stack magazine.

    That's right. It's a technique designed for guys with big hands who shoot manly 1911 single stacks, which pretty much describes all the "world-class instructors" who teach the technique. What it doesn't describe is women. Which brings us to the last three nails in the tactical reload's coffin:

    1) It is slow, sometimes achingly so. At the very time when you want your gun refilled as fast as possible, you're fumbling around trying to remember which fingers catch what. On Brian Enos' excellent Internet forum, good shooters have reported their baseline times on a tactical reload are in the two- to three-second region when "everything goes right." Yeah, that happens a lot! Compare that to a one-second speed reload, the basics of which can be taught in less than five minutes.

    2) The tactical reload is now responsible for the bulk of firearms malfunctions at IDPA matches. Failure to properly seat the magazine can leave you with a gun that doesn't go bang and a magazine on the ground, something of a worst-case scenario in one of those pesky real-world situations. When we started seriously competing in IPSC matches in the early 1980s we learned very quickly to slam the magazine in place (those plastic magazine bases used to be called "slam pads" for exactly that reason).



    I observed this for myself at the match referenced in the beginning of this article after being given a heads-up by Tom Judd, the match director. Tom and I started Front Range IDPA simultaneously with the national organization cranking up; our IDPA membership numbers are among the first 10 issued. Tom, a veteran firearms and tactical instructor, was and is concerned about the increase in "failure to seat" malfunctions driven by tactical reloads.

    "Are we teaching a technique that leads to malfunctions at a time when the person can least afford them?" he asked. I saw numerous failures to seat, including magazines dropping onto the ground. I also saw even more shooters taking extra time to make sure the magazine was seated after a tactical reload, pushing the average reload time into the five- to 10-second arena.

    3) Because the tactical reload is based on nonfundamental fine motor movements, it requires more mental attention to have any hope of accomplishing it in an expedited manner. That means during the course of the reload, the shooter's focus is off the threat. Setting aside the issue of whether this is even possible given that a million years of evolution and a screaming IM demand that our attention stay on what's trying to kill us, you've now turned your attention away from your attacker for at least a couple of seconds. We know from the Tueller Drill that a determined attacker can cover 21 feet--seven yards--in 1.5 seconds. We also know that the overwhelming majority of civilian gunfights happen inside seven yards. While you're behind cover playing with your gun, your assailant is moving, getting into a better position to whack you. In the five seconds it's likely to take you to reload, your assailant could relocate his or her whole family into the neighborhood and probably erect a tent. Five seconds is forever.

    I had occasion to spend some time with an Israeli security specialist, military sniper and top firearms instructor a few months back. He was conversant with the shooting sports, and although his name can't appear in this article, I think his comments are germane.



    "We stopped teaching tactical reloads," he told me, "because the people who tried to do them kept getting killed."

    So what do you do if you're trapped in Condition Black and you have a chance to reload? Speed reload the gun! Drop the partially used magazine on the ground, ram the full magazine in hard, and continue with what you were doing as quickly as possible. If you're kneeling behind cover when you do the reload and there's time, by all means pick up--another fundamental monkey move--the partially charged magazine, and stuff it somewhere.

    And if you're worried about not having enough ammunition in a firefight--even though no civilian gunfight that I could find reference to has been decided on round count--do what my Israeli friend suggests: "Carry more magazines."
    And for IDPA, c'mon guys, it's past time for a little tactical reality check."

    Veteran handgun competitor and author Michael Bane is host of the television series Shooting Gallery on The Outdoor Channel. He's also the managing consultant for the National Shooting Sports Foundation's media education program.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    Great post .. I have never been a fan of the tac reload as says above to many things to do at once.

    Im of the speed reload type drop the mag to the gound get another in and go

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    Angry

    "IDPA sucks...blah, blah, blah... IDPA ain't real life.....blah, blah blah." Personally I am tired as hell about this B.S. coming from people that should know better.
    It is my opinion that those High-Speed-Low-Drag teacher-operators that have nothing but contempt for IDPA are doing it because of plain ignorance or jealousy. If anything IDPA has helped teach people some BASIC rules and tactics regarding the defensive use of a handgun and to disregard IDPA altogether its akin to disregard literacy programs because they start with Dick-and-Jane type of books instead of the Complete Works of William Shakespeare.

    Yes, IDPA is a game. Yes, IDPA does not simulate real life encounters, but then again NO SINGLE TACTICAL PROGRAM ANYWHERE SIMULATES REAL LIFE ENCOUNTERS. No Thunder Ranch, No Valhala and nothing that Jim Cirillo can teach you. At best, you can learn some "advanced" tactics and hope you have the mindset to remember them and use them once the SHTF.

    I think it was the City of Seattle Fire Department who discovered some time ago that a person applying bad CPR to a heart attack victim resulted in the increase in probabilty that the victim would survive until proper medical care could be provided than if no CPR at all was administered. IDPA is that, Bad CPR but always a thousand times better than no CPR at all. It gives you a chance to survive.

    In my IDPA club I have the luck and honor to shoot with people that are defined as "Been there, done that, have the T-Shirt and the frigging scars to prove it." They enjoy the sport and enjoy helping and teaching those of us that came "virgin" to the sport, to guns and to the defensive use of weapons. Lots of us have gone to take "advanced" classes more oriented towards tactical scenarios and everyday life and we know IDPA is just a plain game but we do not disparage it, we still shoot it and enjoy it and we share our learning and experience to those who are starting in the game and the gun culture.
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

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    Thumbs up Miggy - Great Comments

    Thanks for posting.
    I am (For Sure) not slamming IDPA.
    It is an incredibly valuable teaching tool.
    I believe that IDPA is the small taste of real life that most would not even come close to getting to "sample" otherwise.
    I also am 100% FOR anything and...any "shooting sport" that gets folks out and shooting firearms.
    Lots of shooting & ALWAYS ~ The MORE ~ The Better!
    I want folks to know that I do not share that entire (above) opinion.
    I just do not like the Reload With Retention.
    My thread topic is really about holding onto mags in an actual SHTF scenario which I do not think is a good idea.
    I do not think it's a good idea to attempt to ingrain that specific behavior as it might lead to possible "fumble/hesitation problems" later on.

    Notice in the above article the only sentences that I put in BOLD are the ones that relate directly to the Tac Reload which I do think is modestly dumb.
    Just my opinion on that though.
    Last edited by QKShooter; August 31st, 2005 at 10:36 AM.

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    I callin’ BS on this one. I’ve been seeing a lot of “authoritative” criticism of the tactical reload by implying it is being widely taught as a gunfighting tool. I have been to a number of shooting schools that teach the tactical reload, but not one of them teach that a tactical reload should be used in/during a gunfight. The tactical reload is valid method for reloading a gun in non-gunfight situations. It is an administrative function just as cleaning the gun is. One would/should no more attempt a tactical reload during a gunfight than he would stop to clean his gun. But that doesn’t mean the tactical reload doesn’t have a place – its place is just not in/during a gunfight.

    An example where a tactical reload would be appropriate: a gunfight is over, the BG(s) is in cuffs, and there is any number of officers securing the scene. Now is the time for a tactical reload. Sure you can do a speed reload and drop the most troublesome part of your gun to the asphalt or concrete and hope it doesn't do any damage to it, or you can take your time and tact load. There's no hurry, there's no threat, there’s no pressure, there’s no danger.

    As far as Walt Rauch's opinions, bear in mind he heads up the IDPA. In one of his recent articles in a gun magazine he states that he and two friends got together and timed themselves to determine how much difference in speed there was in drawing a semi-auto with a round chambered and unchambered. They concluded that the difference was insignificant and that chambering a round as you draw was quite natural, so he now strongly recommends that semis should be carried unchambered! That prompted me to write my first letter to a gun magazine. I invited Mr. Rauch, et al, to reassess his findings using one hand. I got no reply - so much for his “real-life” recommendations.

    A quote from the article epitomizes the erroneous perception and implication of the tactical reload, "At the very time when you want your gun refilled as fast as possible, you're fumbling around trying to remember which fingers catch what." Who teaches that? That’s a speed reload situation pure and simple. Again, a tactical reload is an administrative tool, not a fighting tool.

    Another issue the anti-tactical reloaders tout is the one second speed reload. Go out and time yourself and see if you can do a one second reload. I’ve have tried and tried and tried and have yet to beat 1.5 seconds with any degree of reliability. My most “likely to succeed” efforts come at two seconds. Most of us will never reach a one second speed reload or even come close. And what’s funny, they talk about the tactical reload being promoted by those who carry 1911s, but fail to mention those that are doing 1 second reloads are doing them with 1911s AND have highly customized guns with magazine wells so deep and wide, the magazines have to have huge floor plates to insure proper seating of the magazine – how does that fit into a gunfight. Go time yourself. Then squat down behind cover and time a speed reload in that position.

    But there’s even more. These same guys that talk about how bad a tactical reload is also talk about the “fighting revolver”. In reality, if you have to reload a revolver, it makes a semi-auto tactical reload seem both fast and simple. To experience the “fighting revolver” first hand, I took a S&W 686 and four Safariland speed loaders to Gunsite for their Advanced Tactical Pistol course. After about six weeks of training twice a week BEFORE the class, focusing strongly on “speed” reloads, I found under “pressure” of the class that there was no such thing as a reliable speed reload with a revolver. And, I had far more failures than I would have had if I had been tact loading a semi.

    The anti-tactical reloaders criticize the semi-auto tact reload as slow, “…tactical reload are in the two- to three-second region when "everything goes right….". Occasionally, I can break 4 seconds on a revolver speed reload, as they say “when everything goes right”, which is iffy. Again, go time yourself, and don’t stop the process or the timer if you muff the reload. Compare a revolver speed reload to a semi tactical reload and see for yourself. You might also notice the manual dexterity required by both and think about an adrenaline pumped body trying to perform each.

    I think this is another effort to prove "their" methods are superior than other methods so you need to come to our school.

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    Excellent stimulating post QK - very thought provoking.

    I thoroughly enjoy IDPA but with shall we say a bit of ''tongue in cheek'' - cardboard does not indeed shoot back.

    That said what it does do for me improve my fluency - getting out of the leather - quick shots that count - plus shooting in awkward physical positions etc. This is why from choice I use my carry SIG.

    I loathe the tac reload myself but accept it as part of the drill for that method of competition and certainly if the pace of ''things'' slowed down then it of course has its place. Under extreme stress I will like most be following what to me is instinctive, slide-lock - drop mag - stuff in new firmly etc and drop slide by slingshot .... assuming of course I actually need a reload. I'd sure hope I was outa trouble before that point!

    Reminds me of the old story of cops getting shot when doing a revo speedload - as they dropped empties into a hand and then pocketed the cases!! Surviving is way more important than lost empties or dropped mags.
    Chris - P95
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    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


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    Thanks For The Feedback Chris

    You Said:
    "Reminds me of the old story of cops getting shot when doing a revo speedload - as they dropped empties into a hand and then pocketed the cases!! Surviving is way more important than lost empties or dropped mags."

    Sadly...I am barely old enough to remember that too.
    That is my only real point.
    Anybody know for sure if shooters that are shooting serious competition & are constantly "beating themselves up" to practice & "muscle memory" ASAP Tac Reloads will attempt them if SHTF at some future point in time?
    I'm really just curious more than anything else because I only know what works for me and what usually does not work (For Me)

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    I used to unload revo's in PPC the ''slow way'' - cases into hand and then placed for later pick-up. That is a downside of being a reloader! I have since gone the other way on purpose even tho I don't revo carry much now - it was a hard habit to break.

    My main focus with semi when speed is of the essence, is from choice the instinctive way I described. I practice that most and I think in extremis that is the way my muscle memory would run - only available time and a lull in action would give me that smidgeon of thinking time, during which I could then afford the ''luxury'' of a tac reload. Pretty much another ''what works for me'' deal.
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    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


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    I thought the thread was interesting and promoted comments which is a good thing, the thread starter did a good one here. People chimed in with what they didn't like and it brought out good points about magazine handling. I am glad to see something about shooting here.
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    May the splinters never point the wrong way.
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    From the IDPA rulebook, page 50:

    Slide Lock reloads are the recommended type of reload in IDPA.Statistics show that this happens in the real world, regardless of intention or training. Tactical reloads and reloads with retention
    are intended for use during lulls in the action and should not be
    required on the clock.
    Again, same page of the rulebook:
    NOTE: HQ urges course designers to draft scenario courses that
    do not require tac-loads or reloads with retention to be performed
    “on the clock”.
    I do not remember the last time I shot a CoF and had to do a Tac Reload. I usually shoot till I go slide lock. Maybe the problem is one of CoF design.
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

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    i will still pass on the tac relaod and carry more mags.. I thing has always been why tak a Mag even if only 2 shots are left in it that i know works out of the gun???

    Sure i know the 2 spares on my right hip worked every other time ive need them but then again were are courting Mr Murphy are we not?

    Ill shoot it to slide lock then change mas maybe not as cool or a tactile as the other way but i trust this way hopefully when im reloading it is all ready all over

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    The gun fight reload is unlikely to begin with. As for Comp. shooting, it can be useful, but can teach bad habits too. As long as ya train to live it's all good. Tac reloadfor me? Only if there is a lull in the shooting. Otherwise I will fire to slide lock.

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    Thumbs up Miggy Tangle FortyFive Bud Rocky & Chris

    I really appreciate your thoughtful input on this.
    Special Kudos To Tangle & Miggy for the obvious effort that you both put into your respective replies.
    Confession: I sort of knew in advance that this thread was going to "stir the pot" up a little bit...and MANY shooters on this forum will now benefit greatly from reading the initial article followed up by your relevant comments.
    Thank You All Though.


    Anybody else care to comment???...Feel Free.

    What sort of prompted this thread was poll taken on another forum that SHOCKED ME as to the percentage of semi~auto "Carry People"...who admit that they do not carry a spare magazine - AT ALL.
    I naturally assumed that # would be "0" but, I sure was wrong about that!?!
    It dumbfounded me that Some People would not be able to effect a real life RELOAD - At All!!!
    That is actually how this thread...came to be.

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    I think I understand the "shooting to slide lock" concept, but does it not have dangers of its own? There's another philosophy that states, "Reload when you can, not when you have to." Of course the obvious implication is trying to avoid running the gun dry in the midst of a gunfight.

    For example, an officer has fired 8 shots out of a 13 round magazine (e.g. an H&K P2000 or Sig 229) in a running gunfight. He has cover, he knows exactly where the BG is, he now has another officer on the scene and the situation dictates that they must reenage asap. What should he do about his gun/ammo situation?

    I think most of us would agree that it would be very wise to reload before he re-engages instead of reengaging and waiting for slide lock. Slide lock will come as a surprise and as we have often heard, it can take a second or so to realize there's a problem, what it is, and what to do about it.

    If we accept that the officer should reload while he can, then what kind of reload should he do? Releasing a magazine and dropping it in the dark, onto unknown surfaces that may consist of mud, water, broken glass, mud puddles, garbage, etc. and not to mention the "I just dropped my mag on the ground and here's where I am" sound, just doesn't sound like a good idea to me. There would be 6 rounds in the mag on the ground. Even if he speed reloads and intends to retrieve the mag, can you imagine what he may stick his hand in trying to locate the mag and what shape the mag is going to be in?

    So how about a tactical reload? He has cover, and he has a partner to cover him while he reloads. A semi-auto tactical reload is simpler and requires less manual dexterity than than a revolver speed reload, especially in the dark. It doesn't make as much noise as a dropped mag could, esp. if the dropped mag hits a glass or tin container, the mag doesn't get damaged or lost, the officer has a mag with 6 rounds should that become important later.

    I'm goin' with the tact load in this situation. In the middle of a gunfight with bullets flyin' - a tact reload makes no sense. But in the above situation, I'm not sure a speed load makes sense.
    Last edited by Tangle; September 1st, 2005 at 10:32 AM.

  16. #15
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    I forgot where I read that those who carry spares mags in real life, only carry one. I carry 2 spares 'cause Murphy is always there with you waiting to trip your sorry butt.

    As for IDPA and Tac Reloads. I am sure that those board contributors that shoot IDPA have done their homework ( ) and have read this little tidbit of info appearing in the last version of the rulebook:

    Tactical reloads and reloads with retention
    are intended for use during lulls in the action and should not be
    required on the clock
    .
    That means that, when the shooter is performing a mandatory Tac or RWR, you gotta stop the clock, write down the time and then start the clock as if it was a different string when the shhoter is ready to go on. Now, we agree that this is veeeeeeeery annoying to do and a sphere-breaker overall. What we usually do is design a CoF and simply say "Reload as you see necessary."
    Of course, standard penalties apply if you wanna game it and start dumping rounds or perfom a Tac Reload or RWR and fail to retain the mag
    Again, this is only from the IDPA game point of view and not a real life one.
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

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