Night lights in your home.

This is a discussion on Night lights in your home. within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Has anyone ever thought out the pros and cons of leaving a night light on in your house? I talking about a small 7 1/2 ...

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 36

Thread: Night lights in your home.

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array Reborn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Rowlett, Texas
    Posts
    1,739

    Night lights in your home.

    Has anyone ever thought out the pros and cons of leaving a night light on in your house? I talking about a small 7 1/2 watt light or smaller. In one since you can see shadows of someone moving about but it also lights up enough so the BG doesn't need a flash light. My grandkids live with us right now, 11 and 13. If they are up and it wakes me I can usually spot them and they never know I saw them. One the other hand because they wake me once in a while I disregard the noise and go back to sleep.........not always a good thing to do. OK everybody give we your nickels worth.
    Psalms 144:1
    Blessed be the Lord my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight.
    Senior Instructor for Tactical and Defensive of Texas
    http://www.tac-def-tx.com/
    CHL INSTRUCTOR
    Retired LEO
    NRA member
    TCHA member

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member Array matiki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    N.W.
    Posts
    2,918
    Quote Originally Posted by Reborn View Post
    Has anyone ever thought out the pros and cons of leaving a night light on in your house? I talking about a small 7 1/2 watt light or smaller. In one since you can see shadows of someone moving about but it also lights up enough so the BG doesn't need a flash light. My grandkids live with us right now, 11 and 13. If they are up and it wakes me I can usually spot them and they never know I saw them. One the other hand because they wake me once in a while I disregard the noise and go back to sleep.........not always a good thing to do. OK everybody give we your nickels worth.
    I've only got two pennies on me, but I'll share anyways.

    Tonight, turn all your lights off in and around your room. Close the shutters/blinds/curtains tight. Make sure it's pitch black in there. Put a towel over your alarm, etc. Set the alarm for o'dark-thirty.

    When you get up... can you see?

    The next night, go outside your house at o'dark-thirty for about twenty minutes and walk around the block, etc.

    Immediately head back into your room, which you've already prepped to be pitch black.

    Can you see?

    Who has the advantage... the person in scenario one or scenario two? Would having ambient light via a nightlight take any advantage away?

    Just my $.02.
    "Wise people learn when they can; fools learn when they must." - The Duke of Wellington

  4. #3
    Member Array tennvol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    NoVA
    Posts
    109
    You do have either a flashlight close by or a flashlight mounted on your pistol right?

  5. #4
    Distinguished Member Array Reborn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Rowlett, Texas
    Posts
    1,739
    Quote Originally Posted by tennvol View Post
    You do have either a flashlight close by or a flashlight mounted on your pistol right?
    Yep
    Psalms 144:1
    Blessed be the Lord my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight.
    Senior Instructor for Tactical and Defensive of Texas
    http://www.tac-def-tx.com/
    CHL INSTRUCTOR
    Retired LEO
    NRA member
    TCHA member

  6. #5
    Senior Member Array BlackPR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lakewood Colorado
    Posts
    844
    I handle things a bit differently. I have lots of X10 control in my house, with a push of a button I can light up the house like a christmas tree. In two areas of the house, the lights are run by motion sensors which are controlled by computer. When someone walks into those areas, the lights come on. I keep an audit trail and can review exactly when these motion sensors were tripped, although their primary purpose is to turn off lights that are oft-neglected by lazy teenagers. By the same token, I can turn off all lights with a single button, or send them wildly flashing off and on in random patterns. Or turn them off and on room by room.

    In other words, I have complete control of the lighting environment (including outside lights) throughout the house in the palm of my hand. I never liked the idea of searching my house with a flashlight, since that just always seemed like a good way of telegraphing that you're coming. Folks talk alot about having a flashlight, but you can see one coming even through a closed door in the dark.

    This was all very inexpensive to set up. I don't use the X-10 plug-in modules, I use either inline modules or replace switches and outlets with X-10 controllable ones. In the event of someone in the house... *I* want to be the guy with complete control over the environment.
    The facts are indisputable. There is more data supporting the benefits of Conceal Carry than there is supporting global warming. If you choose ignorance, in light of all the evidence, in order to bolster your irrational fear of guns, you are a greater threat to society than any gun owner.

  7. #6
    New Member Array Lakerunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SW Mich
    Posts
    3
    Dumb question, but does a flashlite mounted on the gun show the perp where to shoot?

  8. #7
    Distinguished Member Array Reborn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Rowlett, Texas
    Posts
    1,739
    Quote Originally Posted by Lakerunner View Post
    Dumb question, but does a flashlite mounted on the gun show the perp where to shoot?
    That is not a dumb question but no one here is necessarily talking about mounted to the gun. You need someway to light up where you are looking; you don't want to shoot some family member. I agree that a flashlight is not the perfect way but if and I repeat if you have to search a place in the dark.........you need some kind of light. That is the reason one should be trained on how to do a search.......you have to cut the odds as much as possible.
    Last edited by Reborn; March 11th, 2008 at 03:07 PM. Reason: spellling
    Psalms 144:1
    Blessed be the Lord my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight.
    Senior Instructor for Tactical and Defensive of Texas
    http://www.tac-def-tx.com/
    CHL INSTRUCTOR
    Retired LEO
    NRA member
    TCHA member

  9. #8
    Senior Member Array BlackPR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lakewood Colorado
    Posts
    844
    Quote Originally Posted by Reborn View Post
    I agree that a flashlight is not the perfect way but if and I repeat if you have to search a place in the dark.........you need some kind of light. That is the reason one should be trained on how to do a search.......you have to cut the odds as much as possible.
    And I should point out that it's great to have the control over my lights and stuff that I do... it doesn't do a bit of good if there's no power. So a good light is still needed.
    The facts are indisputable. There is more data supporting the benefits of Conceal Carry than there is supporting global warming. If you choose ignorance, in light of all the evidence, in order to bolster your irrational fear of guns, you are a greater threat to society than any gun owner.

  10. #9
    VIP Member Array matiki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    N.W.
    Posts
    2,918
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackPR View Post
    And I should point out that it's great to have the control over my lights and stuff that I do... it doesn't do a bit of good if there's no power. So a good light is still needed.
    Indeed. You must have some way to visually identify your target. That said, I wait to turn mine on until the last possible moment.
    "Wise people learn when they can; fools learn when they must." - The Duke of Wellington

  11. #10
    VIP Member Array cdwolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    MS
    Posts
    2,261
    I have a 120 lumen surefire mounted on my USP plus a 80 lumen handheld beside it! When that much light hits you you are blind!! I will know by then if i drop the hammer or not!! Always use cover!!
    GUN CONTROL= I WANT TO BE THE ONE IN CONTROL OF THE GUN

    A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

  12. #11
    Distinguished Member Array LenS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Commiechusetts
    Posts
    1,631
    We have "lit switches" on many of our wall switches. That little neon light gives off a glow that is adequate for me (at night) to navigate around my house easily. It's amazing how much light it gives off all the time.

    It's NOT enough to ID someone in a shoot/no-shoot situation, but plenty to tell you where someone is located . . . then you use the flashlight.

    I do like the X-10 idea however.

    Outside our house I have floodlights on motion/light sensors. They are always in the "on" position, so if someone (or a deer/dog) approaches, they go on. I just bought a solar panel operated floodlight to go on my shed, as I have no power out there and wanted something so that if I go to the shed at night, I can find my way without stumbling on anything. It was $30. at Costco's. Waiting for the mushy ground (from rain) to dry out so I can put a ladder out there and mount it without sinking in the mud.

  13. #12
    VIP Member Array havegunjoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,206

    Not a dumb question and yes, I think it does.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lakerunner View Post
    Dumb question, but does a flashlite mounted on the gun show the perp where to shoot?
    And I think some recent research bears this out. Below is an excerpt from a source of mine that primarily conducts research for police departments. This particular bit of information dealt with a rumor that California street gangs were training members to shoot cops at night by aiming for the highly visible patch of white T-shirt exposed above the top of many officers’ vests. As you can see from the excerpt below that people indeed respond by “picking up noticeable elements of each person they scanned” including an “activated flashlight”. Envision yourself clearing your home in the dark with a finger of light pointing right at you for any bad guy to see and aim at.

    "Our research on attention shows that when people are trying to understand what is happening in a stressful, uncertain situation, they scan the scene quickly and grasp little bits of available information," he explains. "This process is automatic, almost instinctive. For the most part, their attention is attracted to something first and then shortly after that they recognize why it caught their attention.

    "This was verified in one Force Science study in which officers were thrust into a rapidly evolving, very complex and dynamic situation. Their immediate response was to scan the scene in an effort to understand it. In doing so, they reported picking up noticeable elements of each person they scanned. Something about that person attracted their attention to a particular body part, article of clothing or motion.

    "The same phenomenon is at work with the 'Triangle of death' under low-light conditions. The brightest part of the officer's body is automatically drawing the attention and the gunfire of subjects intent on attacking."

    Firearms expert Ron Avery, a technical advisor to the FSRC, notices the same low-light aiming tendency that Richards documented when he's training officers from a wide variety of agencies through his Practical Shooting Academy.

    As he puts it: "People shoot at what they can see, what they can focus on, not at what you train them. In low-light conditions, movement, shine, contrast and outline (silhouette) all become target indicators to a potential attacker. Shooters tend impulsively to take the target of opportunity, and when time is not working in their favor the target of opportunity is whatever is most noticeable."

    The problem is by no means limited just to white T-shirts under a dark uniform, Avery emphasizes. "Light-colored shoulder patches, shiny badges, bright metal on hats, an activated flashlight-anything that creates a contrast can be dangerous. In semi-darkness like ambient moonlight, even sweat on your face and hands can be reflective."

    For safety, he says, "you want to minimize yourself as a target." This includes keeping your clothing low-contrast, staying in shadows as much as possible at night when you're moving or pausing to observe, and being aware of your background environment."



    I just don't find flashlights to be a good thing to use while moving about a dark house. I know I will get a lot of arguments from this and perhaps I should move this to another thread.
    DEMOCRACY IS TWO WOLVES AND A LAMB VOTING ON WHAT TO HAVE FOR LUNCH. LIBERTY IS A WELL ARMED LAMB CONtestING THE VOTE.

    Certified Instructor for Minnesota Carry Permit
    NRA Pistol and Personal Protection Insrtuctor
    Utah Permit Certified Instructor

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array David in FL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,342
    I had to chuckle......we have an 8-year-old daughter. There's gonna be a light on in the hall outside her bedroom, whether I want it there or not.

    I seem to lose a lot of arguments like that.....

  15. #14
    Moderator
    Array RETSUPT99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    44,416
    We have night lights all over the house. No one is coming in without the canines alerting us to the attempt. I prefer the 7 watt lights in each room...between that small amount of light and my night sights...we're good to go...
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

    ***********************************
    Certified Glock Armorer
    NRA Life Member[/B]

  16. #15
    VIP Member
    Array atctimmy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NSA Headquarters
    Posts
    6,358
    I like to have the bad guys back lit. A strategically placed night light or a light on downstairs will provide plenty of shooting light because your bedroom should be dark.
    Mark Twain:
    The government is merely a servant -- merely a temporary servant; it cannot be its prerogative to determine what is right and what is wrong, and decide who is a
    patriot and who isn't. Its function is to obey orders, not originate them.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. I had a dirt bag try to stop by our home last night
    By Back 40 in forum Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: April 10th, 2011, 10:37 AM
  2. Encounter at the Sunoco on the way home last night
    By Marc1103 in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 160
    Last Post: February 16th, 2011, 06:53 PM
  3. Home Invasion Last Night...
    By chriskthx in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 74
    Last Post: August 23rd, 2009, 04:39 PM
  4. The night the lights went out in South Florida.
    By Miggy in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: March 23rd, 2009, 04:45 AM
  5. Night stand guns and lights.
    By preachertim in forum Related Gear & Equipment
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: January 10th, 2009, 08:44 PM

Search tags for this page

house night lights contribute to global warming

,

how to set up night lights for your room

,

nightlights in ur house

,

texas chl 2011 wait

,

whole house nightlights home defense

Click on a term to search for related topics.