Gun vault bio-fingerprint - hard to work?

Gun vault bio-fingerprint - hard to work?

This is a discussion on Gun vault bio-fingerprint - hard to work? within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; In my CCW class we discussed options for securing your weapon(s) at home that allows for reasonbly quick access and several people recommended one of ...

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Thread: Gun vault bio-fingerprint - hard to work?

  1. #1
    Member Array yemenmocha's Avatar
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    Gun vault bio-fingerprint - hard to work?

    In my CCW class we discussed options for securing your weapon(s) at home that allows for reasonbly quick access and several people recommended one of the new bio-technology safes (reads your fingerprint). Maybe I'm just new at this but I cannot seem to get it open more than 1 in 10 tries. Is it because my fingers are dry with a callus here and there? Is this technology bad? Do I need to be wiping off the fingerprint window after each use?

    Thanks


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array deadeye72's Avatar
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    I just do not trust electronics with my defensive weapons. If there is a problem like you are having or any other electrical malfunction, then you are sitting there with no way to defend yourself. They have several pushbutton combination safes that are just as fast or faster that are less likely to fail.
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    Distinguished Member Array SixBravo's Avatar
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    Biometrics are designed to do just what the name says: measure your body or an aspect of it. The problem is that when you are under duress or pressure then your body changes and thus it can become harder to get access to something requiring that security. Now I am certainly not an expert on the matter but that would seem to be a hurdle with the problem except with much more expensive models.
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    Senior Member Array ICTsnub's Avatar
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    We use a fingerprint scanner on our keysafe at the dealership, and it's a headache. Ours only reads one finger, and it takes several tries to read. I even have a couple guys it will not read at all. My bedside box is an old Cannon, with the five button Simplex lock. Works in the dark, works every time, and you can set the code.
    Tom

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    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    No way for me to trust any lock box to hold a weapon that I might have to use to defend my life.
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    Don't be a ******* like me. I only scanned a few finger prints at first. Turned out that one of them didn't take (surprise -- I do woodworking and had some woodfiller on my finger). Other prints worked just fine.

    I've now scanned in all 10 of my prints plus 10 of my partners. Don't blamve technologhy for human error.

  7. #7
    Member Array FallenPhoenix's Avatar
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    We use a finger print scanner on the time clock at work, and I'm lucky if I get it to take my print the first time. I have to hold my finger in the same way as I did when it was scanned originally, and I certainly wouldn't trust being able to do that under stress. Mechanical push button safes are secure and fast enough for me.

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StevePVB View Post
    Don't be a ******* like me. I only scanned a few finger prints at first. Turned out that one of them didn't take (surprise -- I do woodworking and had some woodfiller on my finger). Other prints worked just fine.

    I've now scanned in all 10 of my prints plus 10 of my partners. Don't blamve technologhy for human error.
    I wouldn't want to play "which finger will read today?" while someone is kicking in my door.
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    VIP Member Array David in FL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupcake View Post
    I wouldn't want to play "which finger will read today?" while someone is kicking in my door.

    +1. Or....."let's hope the battery isn't dead". I use a mechanical "finger combo" safe and am perfectly happy with the ease and speed of access.

    But, maybe I'm just technophobic when it comes to something like that.......

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    Member Array boss mustang's Avatar
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    I keep my nightime defensive gun, under the matress just below my head!

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array Kerbouchard's Avatar
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    My holster works for me.

    If a combo lock or biometric reader failed just once, that would be too many for me. Same for my EDC, if I get 1 FTF or FTE, it would go off the carry list until I figured out why.
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  12. #12
    VIP Member Array JonInNY's Avatar
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    This is what I use at home. Always works, no electronics, no batteries, no programming. It just works. Available from Cabelas:

    Cabela's -- V-Line Top Draw Pistol Safe
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  13. #13
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    We have biometerics fingerprint scanners here at work. They do not work half of the time, due to wet/sweaty fingers, a dirty reader, etc.....

    I get called all day to open doors to secure areas were the scanners will not let some one in.

    I would not trust them with my life. I got an old fashion push button combo safe.
    A real man loves his wife, and places his family as the most important thing in life. Nothing has brought me more peace and content in life than simply being a good husband and father.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array BlackPR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yemenmocha View Post
    In my CCW class we discussed options for securing your weapon(s) at home that allows for reasonbly quick access and several people recommended one of the new bio-technology safes (reads your fingerprint). Maybe I'm just new at this but I cannot seem to get it open more than 1 in 10 tries. Is it because my fingers are dry with a callus here and there? Is this technology bad? Do I need to be wiping off the fingerprint window after each use?

    Thanks

    I have a GunVault button safe. It's very quick to open, even in the dark (since it has grooves for the fingers). Never had it fail to open. As for the battery issue, I swap batteries twice a year, when I change clocks and also change the batteries in smoke detectors. The batteries are supposed to last a year.

    The new ones have batteries and a plug if you want battery backup.

    The front doors are also spring-loaded... so it's around two or three seconds to have gun in hand.

    I think I'd personally avoid the biometric, just because it lacks the tactile feel of buttons. Your only indication whether or not it worked is if the door opens, and all sorts of things can interfere with it -- even a cut on the finger.
    The facts are indisputable. There is more data supporting the benefits of Conceal Carry than there is supporting global warming. If you choose ignorance, in light of all the evidence, in order to bolster your irrational fear of guns, you are a greater threat to society than any gun owner.

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    Mr. Murphy is my Co-Pilot. I plan for him to always be part of the equation.

    Personally, I wouldn't trust my life to a bio-metrics lock.

    (Especially after reading Balsac's post regarding his personal home invasion shooting incident.)

    For me, I keep my "night guns" (a pair of hi-capacity pistols with mounted tac-light and spare mags) in the top drawer of my wife's dresser, about 12 inches from my side of the bed. I also leave the drawer pulled open about 3 inches or so for quick access. (The XD9sc is kept in a paddle holster in case I need, or have time to throw it on my pants quickly and the Glock-23 with the tac-light is left unholstered.)

    The wife used to complain about gun oil getting on her clean underwear ... until I started placing a hand towel on top of her clothes. (problem solved)

    There are no children in the house so no wandering little ones creeping around the room at night. They are my daily carry guns so I strap them on during the day; they are not left unattended during the day.

    The closet shotgun and AR-15 go in the safe when I leave home for the day but do stay in the closet and accessible if the wife is going to be at home. She also has her pistol accessible to her at all times as well. At night, it's in her purse, during the day, if not in her purse, it may be out next to her on a table or in the kitchen, wherever she may be.

    We also have a basset hound and a coon hound on night time over watch. A more than adequate alarm service for anyone shooting outside the house, breaking glass or kicking in a door.
    -Bark'n
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    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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