Weapon cleared holster tonight - Page 2

Weapon cleared holster tonight

This is a discussion on Weapon cleared holster tonight within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; A few years back, my wife was standing in the front yard with my then 1 year old son. Our neighbor was returning home with ...

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 31
  1. #16
    New Member Array ORCGUY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    3
    A few years back, my wife was standing in the front yard with my then 1 year old son. Our neighbor was returning home with his Sheppard from a walk. A couple of thug kids thought it would be funny to let their Pit Bull out the front door to get after the Sheppard. The wife yelled, the sheppard sought shelter under a car, and the Pit Pull starred down the barrel of my .40, all in what seemed like seconds. The Pit and I had this "moment", and he turned and walked home. 1-2 more steps, I would have put one right between his eyes.


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array Tom G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,375
    Ever thought about carrying a steak?????. That might make that dog a friend of yours for life. Just kidding.

  3. #18
    VIP Member Array grady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Near St. Louis, Missouri
    Posts
    2,837
    Dog attacks can happen any time, and they will be quick. Last summer, while visiting relatives, I went running to prep for a local race. Decided not to carry. Within 5 minutes I was almost attacked by a pit bull. The dog stopped about 3' from me as I was gathering and throwing every big rock I could find.

    I vowed that day to NEVER be in that position again. Since then, I have NEVER walked outside my home unarmed, nor do I plan to ever. I had been carrying a little while, and then the one time I leave it at home I almost got attacked.

    The next day after the near dog attack, I strapped on a belt and OWB holster outside my running shirt and ran right through downtown. Man, I love those open-carry states!

    Spray would have been better if it had worked, but that was before I carried spray. It would have been better because if I had shot the dog, my Uncle's neighbor (the dog owner) would have held it against him.

  4. #19
    Member Array packin45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In limbo
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by retsupt99 View Post
    Pepper spray can be a 'dog attitude' changer...I even carry a 6oz on my Harley...
    I have had many dogs bark or come close, but I've never thought I'd have to shoot any of them...

    Stay armed...spray the 'yapper'...stay safe!
    I was almost dragged off my Shadow by a large dog once, years ago. It was probably midnight, and I was riding home from a relative's house, just enjoying the weather, out in the middle of nowhere. I was accelerating from a stop sign, when I saw a white flash on my left, and heard a quiet click right next to my head....a dog had literally waited for me, leapt out of the ditch alongside the road as I rode by, and tried to grab me by the head. Fortunately, he missed.

    I've had my fair share of dog encounters, both while riding, and at other times, but never in a million years would I have guessed that a dog would've done something like that.

    It goes without saying that we have to be very careful of dogs these days, especially with what seems to be a trend of people who lack personal responsibility owning aggressive, vicious animals, and especially those of us with small kids.
    G17, G26

    Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil...

  5. #20
    Member Array mrhutch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Posts
    202
    i've known many dogs to run aggressively barking only to pounce and lick upon arrival--a big dog with a little fluff ball in tote is no killer. oc would definitely be the only option i would consider if i were even worried (it would take one snarling, nasty dog coming my way to worry me). and if they do pounce, put out your strong arm to absorb the attack and then place your weak arm behind the head and use your strong arm to force the head back and over your weak arm, breaking the animal's neck.


    what's really weird about the eye contact thing is that i have stared down many dogs and shut them up, including a large pit that was in a car next to mine when i got out to go to the bank. he went off as i got out of the car, and i locked eyes with him and he wimpered and shrank back into his seat. worked on a BIG stray mut (looked like a white wolf) at my hunt club one time as well (with hand on the .22 pistol on my hip). maybe it's a gift or something, but i have yet to come across a dog that didn't back down when i made eye contact. some still snarl, but they cower instead of lunge.

  6. #21
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Fayetteville, AR
    Posts
    13,687
    Without delving too much into the animal sciences, the eye contact is part of the dominance scheme associated with most comparatively intelligent species. It can work both ways. Anyone who freaks out, or has fear about bees or wasps---I wouldn't recommend that. If there is one small inkling that fear may be present (even though outward appearances dictate you'll be standing your ground), don't try it. You won't be able to test this out on your own pet, as hierarchy has already been established there. Alas--you'd be left with trial and error alone. Be careful out there.

  7. #22
    New Member Array BDW3006USR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV.
    Posts
    9
    Your encounter was at night. Do you carry a Tactical Flashlight like a Surefire? I have used my E2E to stop dogs coming at me. Just shine them in thier eyes. They can't bite what they can't see. It works very well.

    Also, have you thought about carring a small air horn to scare the dog away. Flashlights don't work very well during the day. But the air horn should work day or night.

    If you do need to use force have OC spray or a ASP Baton.
    One good hit with the baton should stop most dogs or people.
    Also check your local laws, some States don't allow people to carry ASP Batons.

    Shooting the dog should be your very, very last option.

    I hope my info was helpful.

  8. #23
    VIP Member Array LongRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    2,618
    My belief is not to draw unless I intend to shoot, that of course does not mean I have to shoot every time I draw. In this case the dog doesn't know a gun from an apple, so I hardly see the point. Dogs rarely need to be shot unless you have to put one down. As others have said IMO shooting a dog is a riskier proposition with less justification that shooting a bad guy. Same as we do for the BG give yourself other options. Remember, that your gun is not the only tool in your tool box.
    When I was about eleven my auntie who raised doberman show dogs, gave me one of her bitches that was too old to breed to train for obedience shows. One of her daughters got into a fight with her over a ball I was training her with and mom got her throat ripped open. I froze and did nothing as my aunt, a 4 foot something woman jumped into the fray and stopped it. Than scolded me for:
    A) Setting the dogs up to get jealous of one another
    B) For not stopping it immediately, She said you are a human being those are stupid dogs, they can only really hurt you "IF" you "LET" them. All except the biggest of dogs are less than half the weight of the average man, except for a few rare breeds none are bigger than any men. Use your brain. Fight a dog the way you do a human, beat the crap out of it. They are much more fragile than we are. You may get bitten but you will always win if you keep your wits about you. If you have to go there, I know that you can prevail, got the scars to go with the stories.
    Right, but who wants to get bit? None of us want to get to that level unless they are young and really dumb. But knowing that as a fact you are able to win will buy you alot of confidence when issuing GO HOME commands. Which do work. Remember mind set is very important, just as in handgun combat training mind set is half the battle. WE not dogs are physically and mentally dominate. There is no reason to have a defeatist attitude when confronted with a dog. Tell them who is boss and be ready to back it up if needed. Be prepared is have the right mind set, the necessary tools and the appropriate training / skills.
    As others have previously said bring along a cane. I am a huge advocate of canes for two and four legged predators. As they are not seen as a weapon, it may make your (two legged) opponent under estimate you. Canes can be brutal and are deadly if need be. Having one does not make you armed you must learn how to use them, once you do you have a formidable tool that you can take most anywhere and never if ever be disarmed. Of course bring your knife and a good quality pepper spray like FOXX Labs or DPS X-Stream Range Sprays. The dime store stuff is well dime store stuff you get what you pay for. There is a Canine Repellent and Bear Repellent I don't know anything about either but if I was to test one I'd go for the Bear Repellent, personally I do not care if an attacker suffers a little extra pain for trying to hurt me, so I won't being using the kinder gentler PETA spray. Point of all of this is IMO a gun is a bit over the top for a single attacking dog. We all have other effective options. I'd rather take a bite than hit an innocent with a stray shot. If you are prepared the very worst that will happen is your arm will get bit.
    Abort the Obamanation not the Constitution

    Those who would, deny, require permit, license, certification, or authorization for me to bear arms are as vile, dangerous & evil as those who would molest, abuse, assault, rape or murder my family

  9. #24
    Member
    Array Cakewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    292
    Quote Originally Posted by LongRider View Post
    If you are prepared the very worst that will happen is your arm will get bit.
    Let's not forget a little thing called rabies. Not all dogs exhibit the signs of being rabid the same. Getting bit by any animal is much more serious than you make it out to be.

    I have a registered therapy dog and he is rated to enter complex environments when he is with his handler. Those environments can be anywhere from an elementary classroom to a physical therapy center to a mental institution.

    Dogs respond to adrenaline. They "sense" your fear, anxiety, temper, and domination. They actually smell the hormonal secretions from your glands. If you're exhibiting aggression and fear (a common combination), he will respond in kind. If you're truly dominant over the dog in attitude, the dog will sense it, and it will back down.

    Don't underestimate dogs.
    Keep emotionally active. Cater to your favorite neurosis.

  10. #25
    Senior Member Array Pete Zaria's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    737
    Quote Originally Posted by LongRider View Post
    She said you are a human being those are stupid dogs, they can only really hurt you "IF" you "LET" them. All except the biggest of dogs are less than half the weight of the average man, except for a few rare breeds none are bigger than any men. Use your brain. Fight a dog the way you do a human, beat the crap out of it. They are much more fragile than we are. You may get bitten but you will always win if you keep your wits about you.
    Not to flame, but I must disagree.

    I've gotten to watch police dogs being trained. Mostly German Shepherds. These dogs can clear 8 foot fences, run 100 yards faster than you can read this sentence, and take a 250 pound guy down faster than an NFL linebacker.
    They can apply over 700 pounds of pressure with their jaws - enough to crush your thigh.

    Yes, a person in good physical condition has an advantage against a <60lb dog in a "fair fight" under "normal conditions". But then you throw other factors into the mix, such as...

    1) Dogs have better night vision and MUCH better hearing than we do. This could put you at a real disadvantage at night.
    2) Humans with little-to-no training don't stand much of a chance against an animal that has been genetically bred and raised to be aggressive (perhaps I should say "protective"), as many breeds of dogs are.
    3) When humans have something to protect (wife, child, etc...) they frequently don't think rationally. If I was out with my girlfriend and a mangy-looking large dog started running towards us, you better believe I'd draw. I'm not taking a chance on getting into a fight with the thing which I may or may not win - I know my .45 ACP will win.

    Humor me for a moment and imagine this scenario - you're in an urban environment at night, maybe making a late-night run to the store or coming home from work late. You're returning to your car, parked just around the corner of the (store/building you work in/etc...). As you come around the corner, there's a large-ish (60-70 pound) black mutt over by your car that notices you and keeps its eyes on you. As you walk towards your car, it starts heading your way, and growling/barking agressively (not a "hello, lets play" bark). For example's sake, let's assume you DO NOT have mace, but you DO have your EDC gun and at least one knife.
    Are you really telling me at this point, you'd rather risk a "fistfight" (should I say, "fist vs teeth" fight?) with this dog, and potentially end up rolling around on the ground wrestling it, where it could have a chance to bite your throat or another major artery and put YOUR lights out? Sure you can say "I'd kick it" and etc... but there are always unknown variables. You could slip on some unseen trash in the parking lot. The dog could successfully bite your foot/ankle and get you off balance. Then you'd be in a world of trouble - fighting a dog from it's own height removes any advantage you may have had.
    No sir, I'm going to draw down and yell in the deepest, most bellowing voice I can muster "GET OUT OF HERE" and hope the dog has enough sense to heed my warning.
    I will note that if you were carrying mace in this scenario, that would be another story.

    Even when we're talking about sub-60-pound dogs, they can still present a credible threat under the right circumstances (at night, human has little training, etc...).

    Don't get me wrong, I'm a dog lover myself and I would never want to kill a dog except in self defense, but I know where I stand on the food chain.

    I largely blame the owners for not training their dogs better, keeping an eye on them, and taking responsibility. Very much like children, actually.

    Peace,
    Pete Zaria.
    Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
    - Margaret Mead


    "Booger Hook Off the Bang Switch" - unknown

  11. #26
    Moderator
    Array Bark'n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    West Central Missouri
    Posts
    9,917
    My brother in law lives on a bad road in a rural area and has had to put down several dogs over the years that have been hit by cars on the road in front of his house. From now on, he won't use anything less than a high powered rifle because a handgun is too questionable. Before going to the rifle, he tried a 12 ga. shotgun on one, point blank to the head, assuming like most people that would do the trick with one shot. It didn't and he felt horrible about it. Btw... Handguns he's used has been .357 mag and .45 acp.

    He has had about a 50-50 chance of killing them outright when using a handgun and has had to shoot several of them repeatedly. And that is after they have been run over by speeding cars, trucks and school buses. All he wants to do is end their suffering as quickly and cleanly as possible.

    So when you say OC spray is rather iffy... I would think it is certainly no more iffy than using your handgun.

    The other thing is, if all you do is dissuade the dog from continuing his attack with the spray and provided yourself with time to escape, then you've accomplished the desired effect without shooting someone's dog. Which in some cases could bring more headaches than you want to deal with.

    While I won't hesitate to shoot a dog, if necessary, I feel totally confident in using OC spray first.

    Also, with the handgun, it's easy to miss a charging dog where as with the OC spray I can continue hosing him down while moving off the X axis, until I get a good dose directly in his face.

    While I suppose it is possible for an aggressive dog fail to be deterred with the OC spray, I know about 10 people who have used it successfully the first time and no one who has had it fail yet.

    Also my mailman said it's never failed him yet. The mail carriers in my town use something called "Halt", but I didn't ask what it was specifically.

    Bear in mind that a Canines noses are 1000 times more sensitive than humans and I would think that a snout, mouth and eyeful of FOX Labs 5.3 million SHU's would be quite effective.

    Just my thoughts on the subject
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

  12. #27
    VIP Member
    Array ctr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley in Virginia
    Posts
    2,351
    Quote Originally Posted by Ram Rod View Post
    Without delving too much into the animal sciences, the eye contact is part of the dominance scheme associated with most comparatively intelligent species. It can work both ways. Anyone who freaks out, or has fear about bees or wasps---I wouldn't recommend that. If there is one small inkling that fear may be present (even though outward appearances dictate you'll be standing your ground), don't try it. You won't be able to test this out on your own pet, as hierarchy has already been established there. Alas--you'd be left with trial and error alone. Be careful out there.
    Ram Rod is right about this. Dogs are masters of reading very subtle body language queues. Any thought of doubt in your mind will translate to body language and the dog will always call the bluff. If you own a dog, and feel confident, I'd go for the dominiant position and control/authority voice. I've had success with this in the past. However, some breeds are just too hard headed and it may not work, so you have to be able to back it up.

  13. #28
    Member
    Array Cakewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    292
    Quote Originally Posted by ctr View Post
    Ram Rod is right about this. Dogs are masters of reading very subtle body language queues. Any thought of doubt in your mind will translate to body language and the dog will always call the bluff. If you own a dog, and feel confident, I'd go for the dominiant position and control/authority voice. I've had success with this in the past. However, some breeds are just too hard headed and it may not work, so you have to be able to back it up.
    It's really not about body language. It's about your adrenaline. Dogs smell adrenaline, and react accordingly. Now, if your dog is trained, they will react to "bad" adrenaline in a proper way, but usually they will react to aggression with aggression. It's in their nature, and it has nothing to do with body language or calling the bluff.
    Keep emotionally active. Cater to your favorite neurosis.

  14. #29
    Senior Member Array mulle46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,164
    I have doubts about the effectiveness of O.C. on dogs after seeing a video during my police academy class on O.C. of a Rottweiler taking (IIRC) 3 or 4 separate hits of O.C. and the only reaction of the dog was to sneeze.Im not sure if the dog was a trained dog or not. I've also seen police dogs being trained, taken a hit (with a bite sleeve on from a 110lbs+ Shepherd) and I know I wouldn't want to be in a confrontation with a dog like that. Part of the training I observed was watching a dog pull a officer approx. 200lbs out the drivers door from the passenger seat of a minivan. All the officers who were watching the training with me took a hit from the same dog(with bite sleeves), one officer actually had teeth marks and bleeding from the bite even through the sleeve. We were also told by the handlers NOT to make eye contact with the dog. Eye contact is definitely something to consider on a case-by-case basis. As a sidenote, the Belgian Malinois that was there seemed to be more powerful than the Shepherd.
    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Eleanor Roosevelt

  15. #30
    VIP Member Array LongRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    2,618
    Quote Originally Posted by Cakewalk View Post
    Don't underestimate dogs.
    Agreed, only idiots underestimate their enemy. Sorry that you read that into my post, as I never said anything even close to that. I did say I would rather be bit than hurt someone needlessly

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Zaria View Post
    Not to flame, but I must disagree.
    You of course are free to disagree. In fact another point of view can be most beneficial. But I am confused about what you disagree with or if you read my post at all. Rather than present an argument against a single statement out of context, or create unrelated scenarios. Why not discuss exactly what do you disagree with?
    Do you disagree that being properly prepared is our best defense?
    Do you disagree that having the proper mind set based upon verifiable facts?
    Do you disagree that having a cane, quality pepper spray, a good quality knife, in addition to the gun you carry.
    Do you disagree about needing training and skills to properly use those tools?
    Do you disagree with a course of action I briefly touched on, to use voice commands first rather than opening fire and blasting away at the first sign of potential canine aggression?
    Which ever it is you disagree with please clarify and enlighten us with your experience
    Sorry to those who already waded through my first post but as a refresher of what I did actually say: Regarding mind set attitude I said
    Quote Originally Posted by LongRider View Post
    Remember mind set is very important, just as in handgun combat training mind set is half the battle....snip
    There is no reason to have a defeatist attitude when confronted with a dog.....snip
    WE not dogs are physically and mentally dominate.....snip
    knowing that as a fact will buy you alot of confidence when issuing GO HOME commands.....snip
    What part do you disagree with? Please let me know what is incorrect
    I suggested using the same equipment we carry for human animals
    Quote Originally Posted by LongRider
    have the necessary tools
    I am a huge advocate of canes....snip
    Canes can be brutal and are deadly if need be.....snip
    Of course bring your knife and a good quality pepper spray like FOXX Labs or DPS X-Stream Range Sprays....snip
    What did you disagree with. Again, please let us know what you superior options would be?
    I addressed training and appropriate skills. IMO all the best tools in the world are of little use without training, skill and knowledge
    Quote Originally Posted by LongRider
    have the appropriate training / skills....snip
    Having one (a weapon) does not make you armed you must learn how to use them. Once you do you have a formidable tool....snip
    If you disagree with the need for training and defensive skills please share your alternative.
    I did not address specific courses of action as each scenario is different other than indicate that if you are prepared verbal commands are a good place to state rather than blasting away at the first sight of the scary looking dog
    Quote Originally Posted by LongRider View Post
    IMO shooting a dog is a riskier proposition with less justification that shooting a bad guy. Same as we do for the BG give yourself other options. Remember, that your gun is not the only tool in your tool box.....snip
    (with) confidence when issuing GO HOME commands....snip
    Tell them who is boss and be ready to back it up if needed.
    I am sorry if you are offended the simple fact is, for the very reasons you gave hitting an attacking dog, a relatively small target with your .45 while under stress coming at you at 30 plus miles an hour in a residential neighborhood without injuring someone needlessly is highly unlikely. Not to mention the dangers of any discharge that may occur when the dog gets to you because you missed. Nor is there a real need to do so.
    Like gun deaths, fatal dog attacks are extraordinarily distorted in the media. The likelihood of an adult finding themselves at risk of being killed by an unjustified dog attack is statistically irrelevant. The overwhelming majority of fatal dog attacks occur on the owners property to their own family members or friends children under the age of ten. In the 6-year study published in the medical journal PEDIATRICS (Vol.97 No. 6, 891-5), Jeffrey J. Sacks, M.D. and associates reported the finding of 109 bite-related fatalities. Nationwide there is an average of 20 to 25 fatalities a year caused by dogs. They found that 57% of the deaths were in children under 10 years of age. 22% of the deaths involved an unrestrained dog OFF the owner's property. 18% of the deaths involved a restrained dog ON the owner's property, and 59% of the deaths involved an unrestrained dog ON the owner's property. Less than one adult is killed by a dog off its property every other year. All meaning that you will have a very hard time justifying opening fire on a dog in a residential neighborhood placing innocent bystanders at risk. For the very reasons you gave shooting a dog is a far riskier proposition with less justification than shooting a bad guy. Same as we do for the BG give yourself other options. Remember, that your gun is not the only tool in your tool box, there is no reason to resort to your gun in every potentially hostile confrontation. The whole object of my initial post is to present that fact. Personally I would much rather get bit and have to live with an uglier mug than live with having needlessly hurt an innocent, especially a child. But than I never have been a beauty queen.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Zaria View Post
    Humor me for a moment and imagine this scenario -
    Even when we're talking about sub-60-pound dogs, they can still present a credible threat under the right circumstances
    You are correct. I'll even take it one step further. A pocket dog could be deadly If you completely disregard everything I said in my initial post. If you ignore everything I said about being mentally prepared properly equipped and trained. You could fabricate a fatal scenario in which your hands are tied behind your back and your gonads are hanging out coated with peanut butter and doggie treat scent over a starving boston terriers head. This scenario like yours has nothing to do with anything I said, so I hardly see the point. But please consider yourself humored. even humorous. If I ever did find myself in either the scenario you described or mine. I would get into rehab and quite taking drugs (not that I do drugs now). Or if I encountered either scenario and I was not on drugs. I would get into rehab, get on some good medication and never ever carry a weapon of any kind.

    In the real world, having bred dogs, American Staffordshire Terrier, and now Akitas most of my life. I have had only three encounters where me or mine have been attacked by a dog
    In 1968 a long haired shepherd scared me. So I always crossed the street while passing his house. One day he snapped his chain or rope caught me as I was trying to get away climbing up a hill. He bit, grabbed me by my calf and was dragging me back to his yard kicking and screaming. Remembering what my aunt taught me I picked up a rock and caved his muzzle in. He got put down before they took the rabies test. I got the 13 shots in the gut.

    1991 at a baby birthday party my two year old daughter was snatched out of her moms arms by a an 18 month old rot. Had I used my .45 on that dog there no doubt would have been a couple three or four little two year old babies dead had the bullet gone through the rot or I had missed. My gun is not the only tool I have. My daughter still has scars on her arm, but loves all dogs. All the other kids lived and have forgotten about that day. The dog got put down later

    About 1995 a bro's malamute wolf mix turned on me. As he lunged at me I raised my arms and grabbed his throat as he bit my head leaving a scar on the edge my left eye and the back of my skull. I snapped his hind leg while choking him trying to get him off of my face, I beat him until my bros.' pulled me off of him and we did shoot him on the spot to put him out of his misery. Had I gone for my gun first he would have had my throat and as we were struggling there was a good chance several others at the party would have gotten shot if I'd have just started blasting away.

    Up close and personal like that with a dog or human animal is not the best time for a gun. As I said there are many other options learn what they are, learn how to use them, be prepared, get trained, be ready, stay safe. Again IMO guns are not our only option. I do not want to be like the man who because his only tool is a hammer thinks all problems are nails. So I have other tools, the gun being the tool of last resort.
    Abort the Obamanation not the Constitution

    Those who would, deny, require permit, license, certification, or authorization for me to bear arms are as vile, dangerous & evil as those who would molest, abuse, assault, rape or murder my family

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Leaving a weapon in a holster?
    By zdinnd in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: October 10th, 2010, 03:58 PM
  2. In reference to closed thread - Situation tonight! Weapons Cleared Holster
    By Tally XD in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: March 31st, 2009, 07:38 PM
  3. Real situation tonight - Weapons cleared holsters!!
    By Tally XD in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 87
    Last Post: March 23rd, 2009, 09:44 PM
  4. Cleared my house tonight !
    By jfl in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: January 13th, 2009, 04:24 PM
  5. CCW HOLSTER with weapon light?
    By siglover in forum Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: July 12th, 2007, 06:00 PM

Search tags for this page

ankle biter holster

,
big dog holsters
,
doberman
,
foam pepper spray
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» DefensiveCarry Sponsors