Interesting evening at my place. - Page 2

Interesting evening at my place.

This is a discussion on Interesting evening at my place. within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Having been on the receiving end of high arc #4 or #6 pellets, they do sting a little but do not penetrate even light clothing. ...

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Thread: Interesting evening at my place.

  1. #16
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    Having been on the receiving end of high arc #4 or #6 pellets, they do sting a little but do not penetrate even light clothing.
    Shooting in the air is still a foolish thing to do. Better to be armed with al the ammo you can if confronting someone.
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  2. #17
    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slabsides45 View Post
    I do realize that we don't live in a vacuum, and that wind and resistance all play a role in velocity, etc. However, have had close friends (in their younger days) be on the receiving end of # 8 shots coming back to earth, and they still bear some pellets to prove it. If it goes up at 'x' fps, it will come back to the same spot at 'x' fps, as it will decellerate going up at the same rate it accelerates on the return trip....
    Please go back to science class. Your post is absolutely incorrect.
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
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  3. #18
    Senior Member Array Pete Zaria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by farronwolf View Post
    Please go back to science class. Your post is absolutely incorrect.
    Sorry, Slabsides45, but I have to give Farronwolf a big +1 here.

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  4. #19
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    Anybody know what the terminal velocity of a small sphere is?

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    Quote Originally Posted by farronwolf View Post
    Please go back to science class. Your post is absolutely incorrect.

    You beat me to it!

  6. #21
    Member Array monky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1911packer View Post
    Anybody know what the terminal velocity of a small sphere is?
    That would depend on the size of the sphere :) As drag greatly changes speed with size.. unless it's in a vaccum.

    But if anyone wants to measure different size shots..

    Fluid Friction

    You can plug in the numbers and run em to see exactly.

  7. #22
    Senior Member Array JohnKelly's Avatar
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    The shot/bullet goes up into the air with decreasing velocity (due to gravity and wind resistance) until at some point it reaches zero velocity at its highest point. At this point the shot/bullet is "suspended" for a fraction of a second, and then begins the return trip back down. It does not accelerate at the same speed as it left the gun, it simply reaches terminal velocity the same as if someone had dropped it from the same altitude.

    The above assumes a straight up shot, parabolic arcs will retain some of the original shooting velocity after being fired, how much depends upon the angle of trajectory.

  8. #23
    Restricted Member Array SelfDefense's Avatar
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    Slabside45 is exactly correct. It is simple physics in a vaccuum.

    I am still astounded by the number of people who think the obvious is incorrect. The projectile has identical velocity vertically going up as coming down. The reason is the Earth's force due to gravitational acceleration is constant.

    To put it in lay terms, without any additional forces acting, there is no terminal velocity for an object falling in a vaccuum.

  9. #24
    Senior Member Array Pete Zaria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfDefense View Post
    Slabside45 is exactly correct. It is simple physics in a vaccuum.

    I am still astounded by the number of people who think the obvious is incorrect. The projectile has identical velocity vertically going up as coming down. The reason is the Earth's force due to gravitational acceleration is constant.

    To put it in lay terms, without any additional forces acting, there is no terminal velocity for an object falling in a vaccuum.
    This is correct; in a vacuum. But not in Earth's atmosphere.

    Since AIR acts as a fluid (ask any physicist about this), theres no way a bullet can achieve the same velocity in free-fall that it could after being fired from a barrel. The air resistance won't let it go that fast, unless the original muzzle speed was very slow anyway.

    When a shot is fired upwards (not even necessarily straight up), after the bullet has reached apogee (it's highest point) it has depleted all of it's original launch energy and is in free-fall from there on out. It's speed is limited by it's sectional density and air resistance.

    I could do some math and figure out exactly how fast a given bullet could come down, but I can assure you it's nowhere near muzzle velocity. Probably less than half of that.

    Peace,
    Pete Zaria.
    Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
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  10. #25
    Member Array Detroittwister's Avatar
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    Sounds like the neighbor could use a little training, you might have a little talk with the neighbor, sure would hate to see a good citizen get arrested for ignorance. 911 first while being armed and ready to defend yourself if the need should arise.
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  11. #26
    Restricted Member Array SelfDefense's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Zaria View Post
    This is correct; in a vacuum. But not in Earth's atmosphere.

    Since AIR acts as a fluid (ask any physicist about this), theres no way a bullet can achieve the same velocity in free-fall that it could after being fired from a barrel. The air resistance won't let it go that fast, unless the original muzzle speed was very slow anyway.

    When a shot is fired upwards (not even necessarily straight up), after the bullet has reached apogee (it's highest point) it has depleted all of it's original launch energy and is in free-fall from there on out. It's speed is limited by it's sectional density and air resistance.

    I could do some math and figure out exactly how fast a given bullet could come down, but I can assure you it's nowhere near muzzle velocity. Probably less than half of that.
    Of course, you are correct. (Although I wouldn;t bet less than half by a long shot...)

    The actual velocity calculation is very complex as anyone who has studied fluid mechanics can attest. The fluid dynamics are constantly changing and the bullet has deformed so that drag coefficients cannot be precisely calculated. Then there is the tumbling and precession of the falling, irregular projectile.

    We previously discussed this issue and in that discussion, to the end, some were still convinced the initial velociy would not be the same as terminal velocity in a vaccuum. I think they watched a television show...

    I hope the issue is better clarified this time around.

  12. #27
    Senior Member Array Natureboypkr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dukalmighty View Post
    I think you're neighbour firing 2 shots in the air was reckless and in some states will get you arrested.That guy is long gone after getting shot at
    I know in NC depending on where you live you would get charged with firing a gun in city limits. If you are in the county areas it doesnt matter
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