The Family Pet Eliminated

The Family Pet Eliminated

This is a discussion on The Family Pet Eliminated within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Whenever a home-invasion type scenario is brought up there are always a host of replies to the tune of, "My dog will alert me." The ...

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Thread: The Family Pet Eliminated

  1. #1
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    The Family Pet Eliminated

    Whenever a home-invasion type scenario is brought up there are always a host of replies to the tune of, "My dog will alert me." The idea being that if someone were to unlawfully enter the premises the family pet would either attack or at least bark and growl their furry little heads off, allowing you time to fortify and/or defend.

    As defensive carriers we are also defensive thinkers. That's why we have a forum dedicated to hashing through hypothetical scenarios. We try to think ahead to prepare, to be one step ahead of the bad guy if we can.

    While trying to fall asleep last night I was going through some of my "what if" scenarios and a little snippet from a book I read got me to thinking.

    What if the family pet is taken out of the equation? Do you have a back-up alert system?

    In a book I read many years ago an invader would precede his attack by systematically killing the family pet. It didn't matter if it was a cat, dog, bird, etc. He would try to make it look "natural" or at least "accidental" to keep suspicions down, but at least 3 days to a week proceeding his invasion of the home he would effectively take out the family pet to keep it from interfering.

    So many of us rely on our family pets as companions and even alerts, but if, either via natural causes or suspicious circumstances, the pet were to be eliminated do you have a backup plan?

    Would the untimely death of your pet raise your awareness? Let's face it, while mourning the loss of the companion most of us would never think of replacing it as soon as that day or even in the next week or two so there is sure to be at least a couple of weeks of pet-free interference for any would-be assailant. How would you compensate for not having that four-legged alert?

    What would you use to alert you and give you the precious few seconds you may need to defend your home should an invasion occur? Would you make any changes to your home or to your routine?

    In short.. What's plan B?


  2. #2
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    Sadly if the "invader" is knowledgeable, there aren't many things that can't be taken out of the equation. My rich Uncle Sam taught me that.
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure

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    Senior Member Array Divebum47's Avatar
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    I think that to rely on any one plan for home invasion is a mistake. In my home, I have an alarm system, battery and cell backup in case of power outage or "broken" phone lines. We have two dogs, both small but both extremely vocal. Strategically placed, but not obvious weapons and not just fire arms. Also a couple of other "early warning" devices. Most of my friends and neighbors don't know of all of the security measures I've taken, and the measures also change on an irregular basis. I hate surprises, but love to spring surprises on someone else.

    It's my humble (and if you knew me, you'd know that "humble" is seldom a word used in conjunction with my personae) opinion that too many people depend upon one and only one security measure. That might be an alarm, a gun, a dog or just plain dumb luck. I like to have several layers of security protecting my loved one.

    Great post and great food for thought.

    Just my two centavos.
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    Great thread. Losing a pet unexpectedly should be a red flag and a call to action. Layers of security are essential, as Divebum47 aptly said. It's hard to maintain condition yellow while you sleep.
    Liberty, Property, or Death - Jonathan Gardner's powder horn inscription 1776

    Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito.
    ("Do not give in to evil but proceed ever more boldly against it.")
    -Virgil, Aeneid, vi, 95

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    Senior Member Array bps3040's Avatar
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    We have 4 birds and three dogs, so, probably not something I have to worry about. But if they plan like that, probably not much you can do.
    Socialism: A great Idea...'til you run out of other people's money. Margaret Thatcher

    "A man without a gun is a subject, a man with a gun is a citizen."
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by limatunes View Post
    As defensive carriers we are also defensive thinkers.

    What if the family pet is taken out of the equation? Do you have a back-up alert system?
    Yes, in the form of a couple of devices that loudly announce the movement of someone beyond the sleeping areas. Of course it makes it tougher to get out there in the middle of the night, but that's a minor inconvenience.

    This isn't foolproof, but it's a layer that (a) shouldn't be breached by the dog and (b) should kick in even if the dog has been eliminated.

    Would the untimely death of your pet raise your awareness?[/quote]
    Yes. At the point of being "MIA," it's impossible to know why. But I'm a suspicious person when faced with something that could be due to one of many causes, so I'm almost certainly going to be more aware of possibilities at that point.

    I think that to rely on any one plan for home invasion is a mistake.
    Exactly. As a general part of the security "hardening" of one's space, thinking through the layers of warnings can be invaluable. Doesn't guarantee anything, but every little bit helps.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
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    Member Array JohnD13's Avatar
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    We have never had a home invasion, thank God, but there was one burglary attempt. The atemptee met "Nappy", a 120 pound set of teeth. When we came home that night, the back door was ajar, lots of blood outside, lots of blood inside, and a dog with an ear to ear grin. I don't think the police ever caught the burglar, but we never had any more trouble either. Now we have two big dogs. They are the first line of home defense when we're not here. When we are, it's our turn, and they are a trip wire.

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    VIP Member Array David in FL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by limatunes View Post

    In short.. What's plan B?

    Pet is actually plan B......or rather second tier. Plan A/first tier is the alarm system.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in a grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."

    Theodore Roosevelt

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    Senior Member Array bzdog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by limatunes View Post
    What if the family pet is taken out of the equation? Do you have a back-up alert system?
    We keep a backup. :-)

    Seriously tho, it is a difficult issue, not specific to pets. Someone who is serious and smart can almost always defeat/kill you.

    In reality, our biggest advantage is surprise IMO. This is why even if OC was practical, I'd still pick CC. This is why you should carry *in* your house.

    After they get through your warning systems and surprise you, you should still have a few surprises for *them*.

    -john


    Random thoughts:

    Access: Make them work for it, and make them make noise to get it.
    * Make sure you don't use "bumpable" locks. Bilock makes a good one.
    * Consider *two* deadbolts, properly reinforced.
    * Consider a deadbolt keyed on both side if there is glass they can break and reach the deadbolt.
    * Make sure you have sturdy doors.
    * Make sure the door hinges are properly reinforced.
    * If you are building, or remodeling, consider laminated glass windows on the ground floor.
    * Consider after-market security film for retrofit.
    * Motion lights outside.
    * Fence and secure your yard.
    * Consider using solid doors and deadbolts inside in certain strategic locations.
    * etc., etc.
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    Technology; I have motion sensing lights around the house, as well as motion detectors that will alert me when someone approaches the house. The motion sensing lights are high enough where someone would have a very hard time dealing with them, and the motion sensors are disguised enough so that even an experienced BG would have a very hard time finding them. I also have a cheap wireless video system hooked up to my desktop computer that records everything, so I have a view of whats going on outside.

    Behind that is my security system, which has a conventional setup and a cellular feature in case the phone line is cut. With all of that stuff, it would be very hard for me not to be alerted to someone approaching the house. What led me to this was viewing home video of an actual home invasion and thinking realistically about how much time I would really have to repel a home invasion; I figured I would have about 7-10 seconds from the time a door got kicked in to wake up, grab the Benelli and get ready to repel invaders.

    I just wasn't comfortable with that timeline, so I began talking with LEOs I knew as well as some friends that were in the security business. Everything I have done was based on their recommendations. In my opinion everything I did on the outside was relatively inexpensive and certainly not out of reach financially. Everything I did cost less than $600, and while testing it, figured it bought me an extra 30-45 seconds of response time which for me is more than enough to get awake enough to grab weapons and get ready.

    Couple that with the fact that all of our bedrooms are upstairs, and that gives me a decided tactical advantage because I will be firing on them from an elevated position.
    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined". - Patrick Henry

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    Paraphrasing a recent post on another forum about working dogs, a member of that forum has 4 dogs, 2 of them are 'protection trained'. He and his wife were both up and awake and yet someone still entered their home and walked out with his wife's purse. The man saw something 'jumping the back fence' and subsequently found the wife's purse minus cash and some prescription medication.

    Dogs may or may not deter, or even react. Even trained dogs. Single-point defense strategies are opportunity for epic failure.
    Freedom is a road seldom traveled by the multitude - Frederick Douglass

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    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
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    We have two dogs, not trained guard dogs, but ones that will bark if somone/thing is outside the fence they are kept in. Depending on the bark I will get up and look to see what is going on. They run in the back yard and have access to the whole back of the house where there are two doors, one door comes into the eating area the other goes into the garage. They are dogs not people. If one dies or happened to get killed, mom and the kid would take it pretty hard, but it would not bother me that much. If both happened to end up dead at the same time. I would be very suspicious. If that happened getting a new dog in the next day or two isn't going to do much good because you would not have time to learn the dogs behaviour and the dog would not have time to learn the behaviour of your neighborhood/neighbors or whatever and they would be basicaly useless as an alert system since more than likely they would be on full time alert or no alert at all during the first few weeks.

    We keep lights on in the front of the house and back of the house. There is a street light on the corner of your yard. The front door has two doors to get through, and there is an alarm system on the house. I guess you could say we have mulitple layers that would alert me to something going on outside the home at night or even during the daytime for that matter.

    My sleeping habits are very bad, it doesn't take much to wake me up or keep me awake. My wife on the other hand, would possibly wake up after the earthquake shook her out of the bed.

    Unless your going to lock yourself in a steel hardened fortress there will always be some vulerablity in a home, but every layer helps.

    BTW Lima, your going to have to get that little one on a better sleeping pattern. From the time of your post your probably your families best alert device during the nighttime.
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
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    Long time ago when I was a unit armorer and signed for 160 M16's, 48 M60's, 24 M2's and 24 1911's. I was told by the Physical Security guy from post, that if anyone really wanted to get into my Arms room and steal the weapons, if they had a good plan and good timing it could happen.

    So with motion, door and vibration sensors a solid (thick) steel door, huge security lock locked racks could possibly be broken into and stolen what chance for home invasion/robbery?

    Ever Vigilance is the price for security. That's the best I can come up with.

    Oh and I WILL KILL ANYONE WHO HARMS MY DOG!
    "Without fear there can be no Courage!"

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    Sleeping habbits, get dog necropsied

    Quote Originally Posted by farronwolf View Post
    I

    We keep lights on in the front of the house and back of the house. There is a street light on the corner of your yard. The front door has two doors to get through, and there is an alarm system on the house. I guess you could say we have mulitple layers that would alert me to something going on outside the home at night or even during the daytime for that matter.

    My sleeping habits are very bad, it doesn't take much to wake me up or keep me awake. l:
    I used to think it didn't take much to wake me and that I knew what was going on in the house even when I slept. Maybe that was true when I was younger and I had a baby, todler, school kid, teen, and I was alert to the doings.

    But now that we are long time empty nesters, I found that my idea that I am not a deep sleeper isn't true. We had guests from Western Australia staying with us, and of course their days and our nights were completely upside down for awhile. I found out that they would be in our kitchen cooking and talking at 3 AM, and I was never aware of it.

    There's no substitute for dogs, and if a healthy dog turns up dead, that should raise some considerable suspicion. Maybe ask a vet to do a necropsy so you can find out if the dog was poisoned or otherwise harmed. That would be important info, as you would have something to report to the police, beyond a mere hunch.

    I would think you can't file a police report on a dead dog unless you have some solid evidence of foul play.

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    Member Array Tint Bob's Avatar
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    [
    * If you are building, or remodeling, consider laminated glass windows on the ground floor.
    * Consider after-market security film for retrofit.


    I'm happy to come and install security film if you pay the flight

    Tint Bob (UK)

    Solar Screen - glass tinting

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