A Bump in the night!

This is a discussion on A Bump in the night! within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; At 2:54 am this morning, I woke up momentarily and roll over onto my other side. A few moments later I heard a fairly loud ...

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Thread: A Bump in the night!

  1. #1
    Member Array txshooter's Avatar
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    A Bump in the night!

    At 2:54 am this morning, I woke up momentarily and roll over onto my other side. A few moments later I heard a fairly loud thump. A second later my alarm went off. Now I am really awake.

    Right then and there your mind starts to race, what do I do? Let me tell you that what they say about instinct and reverting to your training kicks in...

    For me, my training has consisted of me taking the time to look at my home, where the entry/exit points are, where the windows are, followed by a plan of action should such an event take place.

    I have a room to retreat to, locking the doors, getting on the phone and waiting on the police. Well armed, mind you.

    Except that isn't exactly what I did here. Instead, I jumped out of bed grabbed my pistol (which has a laser and flashlight attached) and quickly cleared my house. And when I say quickly, I mean really quick.

    The way my house is laid out, I exited my bedroom, first stopping for cover at the corner of the hallway and scanned across the den and kitchen area, looking at two entry points, the back door and the garage door. In this area is also a lot of large windows. Along the way I found myself listening for unusual noise or movement.

    I then moved across the den looking directly down the entry way at the front door and front hallway to the right. I quickly made glances over my shoulder, checking my six. No open doors or broken glass. No other sound other than a very loud alarm.

    I actually hollered out "Whose in here". Twice. Of course no response. Adrenaline, I guess.

    I then quickly moved down the front hallway checking each bedroom, looking at the windows checking for signs of broken glass or entry. Finding none, I retraced my steps and retreated to my back master bedroom locking the door.

    About that time, the alarm company called and asked if I was alright (just like the commercial). I responded: "No, someone is breaking into the house". They asked if I wanted them to stay on the line. I said yes. They got on the phone with the police who told the alarm company that they were responding with no lights/sirens and were treating the call as a 'panic alarm'. Meaning the real deal.

    In my retreat to the bedroom, I turned on the overhead lights in the den. Locked in my bedroom, I could see the lights shining under the doorway. This gave me an opportunity to see anyone approaching my door. Let me tell you, had that happened there would have been a tremendous explosion and hail of gunfire! Whoa be it unto the person or persons that opened that door.

    In talking to the alarm company on the line while waiting on the police, she told me that she was watching for signs of motion and asked where the motion detector was located. She said she didn't see anything at that point. I had already disabled the alarm when I locked myself in the bedroom to silence the loud alarm. Her telling me that reminded me to rearm the alarm. Anyone opening a door or walking around inside would set the alarm off again alerting me that someone was in fact inside the house.

    I would estimate that it took the police approximately 5 minutes to arrive, knocking on my front door. They did not announce themselves, only knocking loudly. I didn't open the door until they told me who they were.

    I placed my pistol on the table and opened the door. Two officers walked in and started to look around asking me what happened. A few moments later, more officers walked inside. There were at least six officers.

    They asked what I did for a living seeing my pistol on the table and the gun cleaning equipment on the bar in the kitchen. I told them and said I liked to shoot. They laughed and said that they could see that. One officer responded that it appeared that I had anyone breaking in out gunned and could have done some serious damage and really didn't need the police. They were all eying my FN 5.7. I walked outside with them and saw a much of patrol cars parked down the street.

    Okay. That all happened about an hour ago and I am still pumped full of adrenaline. Anyone care to respond and dissect this, feel free. I already have been thinking about what I should have and shouldn't have done.
    Last edited by txshooter; August 8th, 2009 at 10:33 AM.
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  3. #2
    Senior Member Array kellyII's Avatar
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    well as for what you should have done or not, every situation varies, you know your house better than a possible intruder, so in that aspect I would not hurry through clearing your house, if there had been someone inside they more than likely at that point would have tried to surprise you while you were searching for them. And for locking yourself in your room, thats a safe place tobe, but I wouldnt want to open fire just b/c I noticed movement outside the doorway, for me at that moment I would still want PID. Glad all turned out well.

    I had a similar case one night, I had my house alarm set on Instant. Well I woke up in a frenzy bc my alarm was blaring, come to find out my 8 yr old son was sleep walking and opened the door. Glad I had confidence in my training and didnt open fire bc I seen someone standing in my open door at 3 in the morning....

  4. #3
    Member Array txshooter's Avatar
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    No. I wasn't going to shoot through the door. Only if they forced the door opened and I could visually identify a person. I live alone and no one is supposed to be in my home but me. However, I have had past experience with immediate family members showing up unannounced for one reason or another. So I have always placed identifying the target as a first priority before pulling the trigger.

    As I look back on the situation and examine the events, what I feel that I should have done is follow my original plan of action which is to stay in my bedroom and lock the door and wait for the police. I agree that checking the house could have turned out bad if someone had actually made entry and was waiting. Hollering out wasn't a good idea either.

    What I have learned from this so far, the next step is to check the alarm panel. It is located inside my bedroom door. It will tell me what zone or type of alarm. Based upon what type or zone, I can choose to silence the alarm and rearm the system. If I can't rearm, then there is a fault like an open door. Definitely not good. If I rearm the system and the alarm goes off again, such as a door opening or motion detection, then something is definitely amiss and not just an accidental false alarm. I then can retreat into my 'safe room' which is the master bedroom closet where I have good protection and my shotgun with plenty of spare ammo. Then wait on the police. I also keep a backup cell phone there to talk to the police just in case.

    But you know, the most interesting thing to me is that as I waited in the bedroom behind the locked door all I could think of is 'I sure hope no one has broken in, I just don't want to have to shoot someone'. Weird.
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  5. #4
    Senior Member Array highoctane's Avatar
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    Every situation is different so no one but you can really say if you did well or not. Sounds like you did ok. My question is, did the police find anything out of place? Was it a false alarm? Seems like it turned out alright. Your here posting.

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    Sounds like you did ok, but if you've got a place big enough get a good dog. Shep, Rottie, Pit, etc. They're good at distinguishing false from real alarms and will be not only a deterrent, but maybe even an extra obstacle between you and a BG should the BG decide he wants in anyway.
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

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    Txshooter, I think you just answered your own questions... I think you did great... My years as a LEO taught me to analyze every situation after the fact.... see what you could've done differently and learn from each experience...
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    My bet: raccoons.

    One question. Is your bedroom your go-to room? If the alarm hasn't gone off yet and is still armed and watching via motion sensors, then that sounds like the place to stay and monitor. Of course, if kids are down the hall, then all bets are off.
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  9. #8
    Member Array txshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    My bet: raccoons.

    One question. Is your bedroom your go-to room? If the alarm hasn't gone off yet and is still armed and watching via motion sensors, then that sounds like the place to stay and monitor. Of course, if kids are down the hall, then all bets are off.
    Actually, I think that you are right. We have problems with racoons in our neighborhood. I hear them climbing on the roof at night and on more than one occasion, will hear a bump or thud just outside my bedroom window.

    I guess what puzzled me is that the alarm code showed glass breakage which takes two things to trigger. Frequency and vibration. Now mine are not set to be very sensitive. It takes a pretty good pop to set them off. I know because I have done it accidently. Sonic booms and thunderstorms won't do it. Neither will dropping toilet lids and other falling items. Glass shattering or a load of forks falling the in kitchen sink will.

    When I woke and heard the loud thump or thud, my first thought was no big deal. Heard those before (racoons or other critters). But when the alarm started sounding a second or two later, I thought that someone had kick in one of the doors. That is when the adrenaline kicked in.

    Regardless, this has been a good exercise and taught me a few things. Stay in the bedroom behind locked doors, don't go to bed naked , monitor the alarm panel, retreat into the 'safe room' (closet) if necessary, get on the phone with the police and wait on them. And while you are waiting on the police to show up, take that opportunity to put some clothes on!

    Another thing that I will probably change is that I leave loaded guns stashed away in other parts of the house where I can get to them in case of emergency while I am home. I didn't like the fact that if someone was in the house, they may well have found the other guns and were now armed.
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  10. #9
    Member Array grandma4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by txshooter View Post
    Actually, I think that you are right. We have problems with racoons in our neighborhood. I hear them climbing on the roof at night and on more than one occasion, will hear a bump or thud just outside my bedroom window.

    I guess what puzzled me is that the alarm code showed glass breakage which takes two things to trigger. Frequency and vibration. Now mine are not set to be very sensitive. It takes a pretty good pop to set them off. I know because I have done it accidently. Sonic booms and thunderstorms won't do it. Neither will dropping toilet lids and other falling items. Glass shattering or a load of forks falling the in kitchen sink will.

    When I woke and heard the loud thump or thud, my first thought was no big deal. Heard those before (racoons or other critters). But when the alarm started sounding a second or two later, I thought that someone had kick in one of the doors. That is when the adrenaline kicked in.

    Regardless, this has been a good exercise and taught me a few things. Stay in the bedroom behind locked doors, don't go to bed naked , monitor the alarm panel, retreat into the 'safe room' (closet) if necessary, get on the phone with the police and wait on them. And while you are waiting on the police to show up, take that opportunity to put some clothes on!

    Another thing that I will probably change is that I leave loaded guns stashed away in other parts of the house where I can get to them in case of emergency while I am home. I didn't like the fact that if someone was in the house, they may well have found the other guns and were now armed.
    Just carry while at home and you will always have a gun where you can get to it without the fear of someone else finding the spares you have hidden around. I have several myself but they are all pretty much in my bedroom as that is also my "safe" place to be and that way I know I have plenty of fire power without reloading.
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    Member Array txshooter's Avatar
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    Daylight and the truth is uncovered...

    Well I knew it took something to set the alarm off. I walked around the house this morning after the sun came up. It appears that two legged critters (i.e. kids) were out late doing their mischief.

    They egged several cars in the neighborhood including my front bedroom window. That was the thud I heard right before the alarm. There is a glass breakage sensor right by that window. I suspect I was hearing other noises outside prior to them hitting my window which caused me to wake up in the first place. Makes sense now.

    I suppose that this is payback for my youthful indiscretions and mischief. I did the same and worse..... what goes around, comes around.
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    Distinguished Member Array GWRedDragon's Avatar
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    If you have a shotgun in the closet, why did you clear the house with your pistol?
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  13. #12
    Member Array txshooter's Avatar
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    Adrenaline and what I had in hand close to me when the alarm sounded.
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    Springfields, Browning, Keltec... to name a few.

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