No Hearing Protection

No Hearing Protection

This is a discussion on No Hearing Protection within the Carry & Defensive Scenarios forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I'm wondering what people do about hearing protection (if any) for personal protection. Obviously, we don't go walking around with big over-the-ear protectors, and the ...

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Thread: No Hearing Protection

  1. #1
    Member Array Midnight412's Avatar
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    No Hearing Protection

    I'm wondering what people do about hearing protection (if any) for personal protection. Obviously, we don't go walking around with big over-the-ear protectors, and the little foam ones in the ear all the time are probably not a good option either.

    I don't wear anything, and I rarely have ear plugs with me, not to mention, if the situation ever came up, I wouldn't want to make the BG wait for me to shoot while I put my hearing protection on

    About a year ago, I shot 8 rounds from my 1911 .45 without any hearing protection. The BANG instantly made my whole head buzz and my ears kept ringing for at least another hour after. It's certainly not something I would want to do again, unless I really had to...
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  2. #2
    Member Array Glock23MI's Avatar
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    In the event that you have to discharge your weapon when the SHTF, the ringing in your ears will likely be the least of your worries. I have "muffs" for the range, but that's the only time i keep them with me. I'll occasionally have foam plugs with me if i ride the motorcycle that day, but as you said, i don't think someone's going to wait while you roll them up and carefully insert them into your ears.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array cuban11182's Avatar
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    I don't wear them around the house but Surefire Sonic Defenders work pretty well and you can't really see them. They still allow the ability to hear talking but once it goes above a certain DB they drown it out

  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array Paymeister's Avatar
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    You're talking about when going about day-to-day activities? Forget 'em!

    Most folks are never in a situation that even requires that they pull out a weapon. If they are, often presenting it solves the problem. If one has to shoot, the gunfight is usually over in three shots. The likelihood of ever NEEDING to shoot without hearing protection is miniscule (though not zero, which is why we carry and train). And with the post-shooting mayhem, any ringing in ones ears will be of comparatively little importance. Thus any hearing protection day-to-day really is over the top, in my opinion.

    Plan on hearing aids later if you need to fire in a car, however. But if you're firing, wearing hearing aids later are an acceptable alternative to dead.

    Ears ringing might actually be useful after a shooting: "Sorry officer, my ears are ringing and I can't hear you. I'll give a statement once my hearing returns and my lawyer gets here."
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  5. #5
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    Day to day walking around planet earth...Nothing.
    As others stated if and when the flag drops I'll be most focused on my breathing, second to second.
    If I stayed alive but never heard another thing as a result of discharging my own weapon then that would be a price I'd gladly pay as opposed to having great hearing while napping in the back of an undertakers hearse.

    At home though I do keep two sets of foam ears inside my in case of emergencies firearm lock box.
    As well I keep a set of ear muffs hung on my bedroom closet door as well to hand off to either of my kids or use myself if time allows.

    I do though plan to replace it with a second set of cheap electronic ears again for HD to use not so much for ear protection but to amplify ambient sounds.

    - Janq
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  6. #6
    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
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    I don't think if your in a self defense situation hearing protection is going to be of great concern. There is a good possibility that you may not even experience ringing of the ears. Ask anyone that hunts if they experience ringing of ears after shooting a high powered rifle when killing a deer, elk, or whatever. I have never noticed anything after a shot. Much different than what happens at the range when practicing. Maybe it is the adrenaline or something that compensates for it during stress or excitement.
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
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    VIP Member Array joker1's Avatar
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    You should always wear earmuffs, would kinda enhance your "selective hearing" also. Just tell the wife you still want to be able to hear her lovely voice after the incident.


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  8. #8
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    I fired two Federal HST +P .45 rounds from my SIS Pro in my home. In the moment it wasn't that bad for my hearing. About an hour later there was the slightest ring, but that passed later that day. I remember the smell mcuh worse than I remember any problems with hearing.

    Now, I've fired a number outdoors without protection and it affected me much worse, but this was when I planned to go shooting and was anticipating the noise. Still wasn't that bad though. I usually do wear hearing protection though.

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  9. #9
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    First of all you should always use hearing protection during practice,shooting to see what it's like without protection only damages your hearing.In a SD situation there is the adrenaline dump and somehow it blocks out loud noises,kinda surreal slow motion kinda stuff.you will very likely not even hear the shots or they will sound muffled ,or realise how many times you fired if you have to shoot
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    In one personal shooting with a 12 GA, and being on the scene of shooting many pitbulls with pistols, subguns, and M4s during SWAT entries, neither me or anyone around me reported any issues with their hearing before or after the incident besides auditory exclusion.

  11. #11
    Member Array ecrist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dukalmighty View Post
    First of all you should always use hearing protection during practice,shooting to see what it's like without protection only damages your hearing.In a SD situation there is the adrenaline dump and somehow it blocks out loud noises,kinda surreal slow motion kinda stuff.you will very likely not even hear the shots or they will sound muffled ,or realise how many times you fired if you have to shoot
    The adrenaline cannot (and does not) protect your hearing in any way. The 'ringing' in ones ears after loud noise, etc, is called tinnitus. It's cause by the noise physically damaging the fine hair within your ear canal which pick-up/detect sound, and translate it to something your brain understands. These hairs, when damaged, rub against each other or the skin within the ear, creating the 'ringing' sounds.

    See here (haha) for more information: Tinnitus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    Senior Member Array hudsonvalley's Avatar
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    Imagine a 22 mag revolver with a 1 7/8ths barrel , leaning over a garbage dumpster while aiming at a groundhog...a PIERCING BLAST...did you say something? Yes I did....Ouch and a whole bunch of colorful metaphors.......
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  13. #13
    Member Array BaserRonin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by farronwolf View Post
    I don't think if your in a self defense situation hearing protection is going to be of great concern. There is a good possibility that you may not even experience ringing of the ears. Ask anyone that hunts if they experience ringing of ears after shooting a high powered rifle when killing a deer, elk, or whatever. I have never noticed anything after a shot. Much different than what happens at the range when practicing. Maybe it is the adrenaline or something that compensates for it during stress or excitement.
    There it is. The adrenaline will make it so you don't even notice it under stress. It will be the least of your worries.

  14. #14
    Member Array Recon4Life2's Avatar
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    From my experience you won't hear a thing. You go into audio sensor overload and you'll "hear" it, but it sounds more like a small pop noise instead of the loud noise you hear at the range.

  15. #15
    Distinguished Member Array orangevol's Avatar
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    Ten years ago I shot a wild boar at 15 yards with a .44 mag handgun. We were hunting on foot using dogs to track the hogs and I had to sprint to where the dogs were holding him at bay for me.

    By the time I got to him and was able to take the shot, my heart was pounding and the adreneline was flowing...I never even heard the .44 go boom and it took me about 30 minutes to come down off the rush and stop shaking.
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