How did you approach your boss about being able to carry at work? - Page 2

How did you approach your boss about being able to carry at work?

This is a discussion on How did you approach your boss about being able to carry at work? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; You might want to make sure the libraries aren't posted. If they are, you may already have your answer. I'd find out if they are ...

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Thread: How did you approach your boss about being able to carry at work?

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array varob's Avatar
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    You might want to make sure the libraries aren't posted. If they are, you may already have your answer.

    I'd find out if they are a part of the school system?
    Are they a part of the city/county?
    Are they considered to be a "government building"?

    LIS > Code of Virginia > 18.2-308

    LIS > Code of Virginia > 18.2-308.1
    Don't believe what you hear and only half of what you see!
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  2. #17
    VIP Member Array friesepferd's Avatar
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    make SURE there is nothing in the handbook
    if you dont know ur supervisor, which it sounds like you dont...

    But be sure to keep it quite concealed. Just b/c there isn't a rule saying you can't do it, doesn't mean you won't get fired for it.
    Wo die Notwehr aufhört, fängt der Mord an
    (Murder begins where self-defense ends)
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  3. #18
    Member Array monk's Avatar
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    FYI... Not trying to be a smart ---, as I'm trying to get in the habbit myself.... But what I did to find this info was to type into the Google slot...."firearms virginia libraries"......

    Here's a link:

    ALA | American Libraries - Virginia Lawmakers Shoot Down Bills Banning Guns in Libraries
    Chinese Proverb:
    "When someone shares something of value with you and you benefit from it, you have a moral obligation to share it with others."
    VCDL member (DE.357;Ruger 4" GP-100 .357;Ruger 2.2" SP-101 cc hammer .357;BT .380cc.

  4. #19
    New Member Array jon34511's Avatar
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    I already know firearms are permitted inside the library, as with all city government buildings with the exception of the court. But just because the public can do it does not mean I can as an employee. I fear asking will just bring attention to it and cause things to change, but on the flip side getting caught will most likely cause me to be terminated. I think I'll write something to human resources.

  5. #20
    VIP Member Array MitchellCT's Avatar
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    One has to handle a superior with great care so as not to disturb them.

    I don't trouble her with the information, and we are all happier for it.

  6. #21
    Distinguished Member Array tinkerinWstuff's Avatar
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    as long as you're legal; don't ask - don't tell
    "Run for your life from the man who tells you that money is evil. That sentence is the leper's bell of an approaching looter. So long as men live together on earth and need means to deal with one another-their only substitute, if they abandon money, is the muzzle of a gun."

    Who is John Galt?

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon34511 View Post
    I already know firearms are permitted inside the library, as with all city government buildings with the exception of the court. But just because the public can do it does not mean I can as an employee. I fear asking will just bring attention to it and cause things to change, but on the flip side getting caught will most likely cause me to be terminated. I think I'll write something to human resources.
    If this were to happen, and there is NO POLICY FORBIDDING CONCEALED CARRY, then it is time to get a lawyer and wait for the settlement check.

    The more likely thing would be that they would inform you that you are not allowed and something to the effect of, "We'll be keeping and eye on you!"

    Then you will have to make a decision regarding employment vs. personal safety.

    Just my $.02 worth.
    If you have never broken your gun or bled on your gun in training, you're doing it wrong!
    Train hard, live easy.

  8. #23
    New Member Array jon34511's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoadRunner71 View Post
    If this were to happen, and there is NO POLICY FORBIDDING CONCEALED CARRY, then it is time to get a lawyer and wait for the settlement check.

    The more likely thing would be that they would inform you that you are not allowed and something to the effect of, "We'll be keeping and eye on you!"

    Then you will have to make a decision regarding employment vs. personal safety.

    Just my $.02 worth.
    Haha funny you mention an attorney, my full-time M-F job is for a very large law firm, so finding an attorney wouldn't be an issue.

    I'm going to very throughly read the handbook again, but my instincts tell me nothing will be specifically mentioned because that handbook is the same for jobs that do require a firearm (police and sherrifs).

  9. #24
    Member Array OldLincoln's Avatar
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    I agree with the others. Carry deep and let them raise the issue. Even if someone sees a print and figures it out, they may not think twice about it. After all, you drive between libraries and they would likely see it as a requirement. If asked, I'd reply with a prepared nonchalant statement to the effect that "yeah, driving the streets at night can be risky" and drop it there.

    Also, JDE101's post reveals a "well known managerial secret tactic" of ignore the question. The manager personally thinks it's OK and doesn't want to escalate the question. It's one of those questions that forces upper management to make a policy. The company primary concern is their liability and would rule against carry 99% of the time. I've been there and cursed the SOB that asked the question.

  10. #25
    Member Array mkuisi8mo's Avatar
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    Don't ever advertise...Don't ever tell anyone you are carrying, unless expressly required by law. The less anyone knows the better off you are.

    As a side note:

    Back in the late '70's I was employed by the State of Florida Dept of HRS, in a walk-in community service center. This was at a time that Florida , I believe was only a "May-issue" state. "Shall-issue" did not happen until '89...so this was about 10 years before. Firearms were strictly forbidden in the State building...signs posted at every entry.

    Do to budget constraints, I lost a private office and had to share my space with another worker. During one conversation, he found out I did not have a carry firearm either on my person or in my vehicle. He thought I was nuts, especially since I often took trips across the 150 miles of "Alligator Alley" through a very remote part of the Everglades...notorious for bad things happening to broke-down motorists and "gone-missing" peeps.

    I mentioned the ban on having guns in the State building...he laughed and asked me to come with him (after he showed me his "truck-gun" and the .22LR NAA revolver he had tucked in his belt-buckle holster, which was loaded with HVHP rounds.)

    1st stop our boss and his secretary...He had a .45, she a .357,
    Next all the other co-workers...each had a variety of handguns in various calibers, either in their desk drawers, purses, or on their person.
    Finally, the rest of the secretaries and support staff...virtually everyone but myself was armed...in the restricted building, against the state law. Everyone of my co-workers apparently knew the situation, but no one ever ever talked about it. "Don't ask- Don't tell"

    Shortly thereafter, because of the nature of a particular case I was working on became potentially deadly, the Division Administration told me they were requiring me to arm myself if I chose to stay on the case, and that they were going to provide me and my family 24/7 police surveillance of my home for our own safety. That was my initiation into the world of sidearms and concealment.

  11. #26
    Member Array Phantoms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon34511 View Post
    I already know firearms are permitted inside the library, as with all city government buildings with the exception of the court. But just because the public can do it does not mean I can as an employee. I fear asking will just bring attention to it and cause things to change, but on the flip side getting caught will most likely cause me to be terminated. I think I'll write something to human resources.
    Unless there is a clear policy on it, then if you get caught and are fired for it you may have legal standing in a lawsuit against them. If I carried to a workplace that caught me and didn't want me carrying, the first thing I would say before anything else is "I'm licensed to carry and do so, I haven't been made aware of any company policy to the contrary". They may immediately make a policy, but they'd be a lot less likely to fire you after hearing that fearing being sued. Just don't carry anymore after being made aware of their policy.

  12. #27
    Distinguished Member Array MinistrMalic's Avatar
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    I am usually a fan of asking permission, but in this case I think that you don't need to. If the employee handbook is silent on the issue then it is a plausible defense to say that you read the handbook, saw nothing on the issue, and decided to simply obey the law and carry. If they put out an employee handbook and it is silent on the issue then you shouldn't have any problems.
    "...whoever has no sword is to sell his coat and buy one." (Luke 22:36)
    Christianity and Self Defense from a Biblical Perspective

  13. #28
    VIP Member Array MitchellCT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoadRunner71 View Post
    If this were to happen, and there is NO POLICY FORBIDDING CONCEALED CARRY, then it is time to get a lawyer and wait for the settlement check.

    The more likely thing would be that they would inform you that you are not allowed and something to the effect of, "We'll be keeping and eye on you!"

    Then you will have to make a decision regarding employment vs. personal safety.

    Just my $.02 worth.
    Where did you get your education about employment law?

    At will employees can be fired for any reason or no reason, so long as it is not a reason prohibited by law such as race, religion or sexual orientation.

    If you are fired for carrying a handgun at work, even in the absence of any policy to the contrary, you are SOL.

  14. #29
    VIP Member Array MitchellCT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phantoms View Post
    Unless there is a clear policy on it, then if you get caught and are fired for it you may have legal standing in a lawsuit against them.
    Standing is one thing, a chance in hell of success, that's another.

  15. #30
    Distinguished Member Array Knightrider's Avatar
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    At one of my jobs, I have to carry my gun for my job. At the other, my boss knew that I carried a gun to the job when she saw it on my hip. I knew that she would be cool about it so I didn't ask. So I really can't help you lol.

    Just keep your mouth shut until their is a rule about carrying your gun.
    Glock: G22 .40 S&W and G23 .40 S&W Sig Sauer: P938 9mm Smith and Wesson: Model 437 .38 Spl, Model 65 357 Mag, and Sigma SW9VE 9mm

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