Emotional Consequences from CC'ing

This is a discussion on Emotional Consequences from CC'ing within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I am sure we have all had that moment where we thought someone was invading our homes, just to find out it was nothing. I ...

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Thread: Emotional Consequences from CC'ing

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    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    Emotional Consequences from CC'ing

    I am sure we have all had that moment where we thought someone was invading our homes, just to find out it was nothing. I am sure at some point, most of us have considered drawing our firearms and had the situation turn out to be nothing. What some people do not realize is that someone who carries a firearm responsibly should sit down somewhere, and think. What would happen to me if I had to defend myself? Would I act, or would I freeze? How would I deal with the emotional aftermath? Sometimes we forget that we carry a firearm to KILL or MAIM another human being who is attacking us. Someone who may have a wife, children, a mother and father somewhere who love them. Before considering picking up a weapon, not a sporting arm, or firearm, a weapon, and putting it in the holster, we have to realize that not only does every round fired in the real world have a lawyer attached to it, it also has a mentally challinging, PTSD situation with it. I guarantee if I have to use my weapon I will, but I cannot help but remember the time I had to clear my house because I genuinely thought someone other than my family was there, and how scared I was afterwards.....
    "The value you put on the lost will be determined by the sacrifice you are willing to make to seek them until they are found."

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    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    Since I am not in the military, and not a LEO, I do not carry a firearm to KILL or MAIM anyone. I carry a firearm to defend myself against threats to my life and the lives of those dear to me... to defend against those threats, means to STOP them.

    I have STOPPED a threat to my life in the past without even drawing my weapon.

    If I have to draw my weapon to STOP the threat, I will do so.
    If I have to fire my weapon to STOP the threat I will do so.
    If I have to empty my weapon at the threat to STOP it, I will do so.

    I will deal with the repercussions after the fact. I am aware of the law, and I am aware of my liability under the law, both civic law and civil law...

    The emotional toll will be dealt with... AFTER THE FACT.

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    jfl
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    Quote Originally Posted by INccwchris View Post
    I am sure we have all had that moment where we thought someone was invading our homes, just to find out it was nothing. I am sure at some point, most of us have considered drawing our firearms and had the situation turn out to be nothing. What some people do not realize is that someone who carries a firearm responsibly should sit down somewhere, and think. What would happen to me if I had to defend myself? Would I act, or would I freeze? How would I deal with the emotional aftermath? Sometimes we forget that we carry a firearm to KILL or MAIM another human being who is attacking us. Someone who may have a wife, children, a mother and father somewhere who love them. Before considering picking up a weapon, not a sporting arm, or firearm, a weapon, and putting it in the holster, we have to realize that not only does every round fired in the real world have a lawyer attached to it, it also has a mentally challinging, PTSD situation with it. I guarantee if I have to use my weapon I will, but I cannot help but remember the time I had to clear my house because I genuinely thought someone other than my family was there, and how scared I was afterwards.....
    As a flight instructor I tell my students that "emotions have no place in the cockpit, leave them on the ground"; not easy, but it can be done.
    Listen to the NTSB tapes of emergencies, one of the latest being Cpat. Sullenberger ditching in the Hudson river.
    A fight, gun fight or other is the same way; the emotions come when it is finished, hopefully for you, after the fight !

    I don't carry a firearm to "KILL or MAIM another human being" as you wrote; I carry a firearm to live after a vicious attack.
    The few SD cases I have good personal information on didn't involve a lawyer at all.

    My impression is that you are over-thinking what SD is, and this has the potential to get you killed ... but it is your choice.
    The first rule of a gunfight: "Don't be there !"
    The second rule: "Bring enough gun"

    jfl
    (NRA Life Member/Instructor - GOA - IDPA - GSSF - ex-IHMSA)

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    VIP Member Array mprp's Avatar
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    +1 on the over-thinking part of the consequences. However, I believe that it's a good thing to run through scenarios for the simple fact of maybe being better prepared and possibly shed light on a situation that you hadn't seen before.

    I think that the over-thinking part is, going any further than simply, "Me and my family are going to live." Don't think past that, only that you are justified. Who they are and why they're trying to kill me doesn't matter.

    If you don't think past that line when it comes to the preservation of you and yours, then the intention of the shooting was not to kill or maime, it was so that you and yours didn't get killed or maimed. Nothing more, nothing less. A better stance on that would be that you tried your best to defend your family or youself in a deadly situation and the outcome resulted in a "kill or maime." JMO
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    Have considered all of the above...and am content in making the right decision as I have in the past...

    While the BG may be a husband, father, brother, sister, wife, girlfriend...etc....I don;t care about them...I care about me and mine because the BG hasn't taken my family into consideration when committing a crime against me.
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    VIP Member Array Hiram25's Avatar
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    I'm lucky, after serving in the military (in a war zone) and also retiring from a LEO career, I've been taught to make those decisions in a split second. We can sort out the results later, and I want to be in on the discussion!
    Hiram25
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    Senior Member Array gilraen's Avatar
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    I wouldn't call it over-thinking -- unless you start dwelling on it, and so become ineffective in your self-defense. Everyone should think about it at least once - before we strap on for the first time.

    After all, it was here that I first read "You don't ever carry a gun unless you have decided you are able to use it."
    "I pledge allegiance to the war banner of the united states of Totalitaria. And to the Republic, which no longer stands, several bankers, who are now god, indivisible, with Bernanke bucks and credit for all."

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    I still wake up reaching for my gun in the middle of the night. I've even shoved my wife out of bed because I heard a machine gun in my dreams. Those are emotional consequences. You live, you learn, you go on W/ life. I've drawn a gun 3 times in self defense as a civilian haven't had to fire a shot but I don't doubt for a second that I would have.

    ON EDIT
    I think this might apply here so take it FWIW. In the Army we trained to the crew drill & we trained to do it by the numbers until we could (literally) shoot a fire mission in our sleep. When the traingvswitched to real world we followed the crew drill W/ out a second thought.

    I used to do security on a remote post (as in waaaaay out in the sticks where noone could seeme) I would walk the fence at night and practice drawing my pistol, not drawing fast just going through the steps properly. One night something ( probably a deer) hit the fence right next to me. The gun was in my hand before I even thought about it.

    My point is train until it's automatic

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    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    As a long time cop, I'm with Hiram 25 on this.
    A few other thoughts.
    It is a good idea to give some thought to the ramifications of any severe action. Consider the possibilities and then let it go.
    Train, then train some more.
    While I might have been the vehicle of someone's demise, it was not I that caused it. It was their behavior and activity that brought about their ending.
    PTSD is like some diseases, it effects some and not others.

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    A few years ago, I was awakened by pounding on the door and my female neighbor screaming for help. She said someone had entered her house, raped the daughter and the two of them had fled put a window leaving the two younger sons asleep.
    While my wife called 911, I grabbed a Maglight and didn't hesitate to enter her house, grab the two boys and haul them back to my house. It was only afterwards when the cops arrived did it occur to me, that was kind of stupid--charging in and not knowing what I might encounter.
    Turns out there was no intruder or rape; the daughter had emotional issues, and this was a cry for help from her.
    What stuck with me was that I guess I will instinctively defend life--and worry about consequences afterwards. I've since upgraded from Maglight to Glock 30.
    Retired USAF E-8. Remember: You're being watched!
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    I've carried for over 35 yrs and to this day, I still have the mindset to defend myself and my loved ones with deadly force if need be. I carry concealed outside in public because of the may crazies out there, peopl who are a walking timebomb, with a fuse that may be lit at any time. Aftermeth? yes, there will be aftermath, and I'll deal with all of it when that time arrives. until then, I'll be prepared.
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    I won't discount the fact that there would be emotional consequences if I needed to shoot another person in defense of myself or my loved ones. But I disagree with your characterization that we "carry a firearm to KILL or MAIM another human being".

    I carry to protect, not to kill or maim.

    If while trying to stop a criminal from killing or maiming me or another innocent person, the criminal gets killed or maimed, then that was entirely his (or her) choice - they are responsible for what ever injuries they suffer, and they are responsible for the heartache felt by those they leave behind.

    I'm not saying I could brush off such an incident without feeling emotional turmoil, but my conscience would be clear in that I'd know my intent when carrying a firearm was not for any reason other than to protect.

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    I'm a gentle, sympathetic, and apathetic person. It hurts me to see other people treated unfairly or taken advantage of.

    Despite this, I don't think I would have one second of remorse or emotional problem with killing someone who seriously attempted to rape or murder myself or a loved one.

    In any situation that justifies lethal force, the legal repercussions of going to jail or court are insignificant. If the person firing the gun doesn't think it's worth going to jail for, they probably weren't fully justified in using lethal force.
    "In a world of compromise, some don't." -HK

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    Quote Originally Posted by jfl View Post
    A fight, gun fight or other is the same way; the emotions come when it is finished.
    + 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Treo View Post
    My point is train until it's automatic
    +1 -- to deal with the adrenalin rush (the fight or flight reflex), not emotions as such.
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    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    the point that i was trying to make with the kill or maim statement is that no matter why we carry, that is what happens when we pull a trigger in self-defense. Its not for that purpose, but because of the purpose of self defense, it is a consequince
    "The value you put on the lost will be determined by the sacrifice you are willing to make to seek them until they are found."

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