Any diabetics here? Weird thing happened

Any diabetics here? Weird thing happened

This is a discussion on Any diabetics here? Weird thing happened within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hey all, I was at the range with my son Tuesday evening, and was plinking with my new NEOS. I had a few FTFs before ...

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 52
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: Any diabetics here? Weird thing happened

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array gilraen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    668

    Any diabetics here? Weird thing happened

    Hey all,

    I was at the range with my son Tuesday evening, and was plinking with my new NEOS.

    I had a few FTFs before realizing I needed to give the mag a sharp poke to seat it correctly. It was okay for a while, then after a bit, I had some more.

    I thought, "Okay, it's a Beretta, it needs more oil."

    Then I safetied it and pulled out my trusted Sig 239. Shot a couple mags, and had an FTE. THIS is unusual. My Sig rarely fails me.

    Had my son try the NEOS. It worked fine for him.

    Then I noticed my hands were starting to shake, my arms felt a bit "loose," and my head getting a bit fuzzy. I was having a hypoglycemic episode.

    I packed up, washed my hands, and ate a snack to get the ol' glucose back to normal before it moved to my legs and I had trouble walking.

    I've pretty much decided that the firing problems were not my guns, but me. The shakiness must have caused my grip to loosen, or something else similar.

    It worries me a bit. Your thoughts?

    Has anyone else had this problem?
    "I pledge allegiance to the war banner of the united states of Totalitaria. And to the Republic, which no longer stands, several bankers, who are now god, indivisible, with Bernanke bucks and credit for all."


  2. #2
    Member Array Biomortis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    357
    Occam's Razor. You were in a weakened state due to your diabetic episode. I haven't had one at the range but I've had one while working on an instrument and all of a sudden its hard to get the screwdriver in the screw slot or I keep dropping a pair of pliers. Since your son had no issues, I think its safe to say it was you. The hypoglycemic episodes are rough my friend. Glad it wasn't during a SHTF episode.
    Glock 22 (G2) & 27 (G3)
    S&W 686 .357 4" Stainless Pre-lock
    Ruger 10/22
    Marlin Model 65 .22LR - 1968
    Remington Model 31 16ga - 1932
    Remington 1900 12ga - 1904

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member Array Black Knight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    1,345
    I know what you are saying. I have been a diagnosed diabetic since 2002. Similar thing happened on the job. I was setting post with my partner and felt weak and started to shake slightly. I took a blood/sugar reading and was considerably lower than what I was used to. I got some snacks and felt fine afterwards. I now try to keep some sort of fast acting glucose close by. Orange juice is a good source as are glucose tablets and paste. Take care of yourself. It is estimate that there are more than 15 million diabetics in the country and only about 1/3 are diagnosed. There are also many complications that can crop up from time to time that are asociated with diabetes. To those who don't know if they are diabetics or not please see your doctor. There are several simple tests they can run to determine this. It can save your life, extend your life, or help make your life more enjoyable. For a great source of information on Diabetes check the American Diabetes Association web site.

  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array Squawker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,614
    I haven't had that particular problem, but one Sunday morning, my wife was trying to wake me, and when she couldn't, she called 911. I woke up as the paramedics were injecting D50 (50% dextrose in water) IV. And once, earlier this year, I passed out at work from hypoglycemia. I had never had that happened until that episode at home. As diabetics, we have to take care that our blood sugar doesn't go too low, in addition to too high. I'm glad that you only had your hands shaking. Now you know to watch your blood sugar carefully.
    "We are the people our parents warned us about!" J. Buffett

  5. #5
    Senior Member Array gilraen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    668
    That's part of what was so scary: the degradation in my shooting abilities happened *before* I realized I was shaking. And what happens in a SHTF scenario? Adrenaline shoots upward, metabolism boosts, glucose gets consumed and levels drop - fast.

    Dang.

    I had one early morning wake-up crisis; i could barely walk. So I've started carrying candies in my purse. Never going to be without them, now. The alternative is a bit too frightening.
    "I pledge allegiance to the war banner of the united states of Totalitaria. And to the Republic, which no longer stands, several bankers, who are now god, indivisible, with Bernanke bucks and credit for all."

  6. #6
    Member Array reyno2ac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Oak Park, MI
    Posts
    481
    You just need to watch what you're eating a little closer. I'm not diabetic but I am hypoglycemic and I have this happen to me a lot, especially when I'm stressed out and not watching what I eat.
    Guns don't kill people, people kill people...and chimps do, if they have a gun

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array BkCo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,102
    Carry the tablets they work faster. Also check your suger at regular times. I hate when I get drops.
    Semper Fi

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array NCHornet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mt Airy, NC
    Posts
    2,156
    hypoglycemia is not diabetes, but as with diabetes you need to check your blood sugar and check it often. The longer you have low blood sugar drops the less you will feel them coming on. I use to be able to tell by the way I was feeling if my sugar was low or high. Now my sugar level can bottom out and I don't see it coming. This can be very bad when you are carrying. When you sugar gets to low or to high you have a altered mental status and lack good judgement. I try and check my sugar 6 to 8 times each day depending on what I have had to eat or what I have been doing. To help stabilize your sugar levels eat something like peanut butter. The sugar tablets should always be close to you, they also have it in a squeeze tube. If you do your part you won't have any issues with it. I wish you the best, I am in your same boat and totally understand what you are going through. I always check my sugar levels before I drive or before leaving the house, I have a smaller meter that I take with me. If I can help in anyway just PM me.
    NCH
    When Seconds Count, The Cops Are Just Minutes Away!!
    Carry On!
    NCHornet

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array Keltyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Spartanburg, SC
    Posts
    785
    I'm a diabetic and I've had two major (hospital trip) and several minor hypoglycemic episodes. They come on fast, and unless you know what to look for, can incapacitate you before you know it. I've learned to look for the very first stages: lowered concentration, shaking, a "glazed over" feeling, weakness. Sometimes a clammy feeling. If any of that happens, I know I need to eat - RIGHT NOW. This is a crash emergency. I carry two glucose solution bottles in my car for this purpose. I'll pop two of them, wait about 5 minutes to be sure I'm cognitive and ambulatory, then get something to eat. I try to prevent these episodes by eating snacks between my big meals. Even if it's only 4-5 hours between two meals, I'll eat a little something.

    Be sure your wife and son know that you're diabetic and what to do for you if an episode occurs.

    I'm glad everything went well. Yea, it IS scary how rapidly your thought and motor skills will degrade.

  10. #10
    Distinguished Member Array Ghettokracker71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Under a rock.
    Posts
    1,763
    Yikes. My wife is Type I insulin dependant diabetic, it can be some scary busines;Especially when she was pregnant. Im glad it turned out OK, and wish you the best!

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array TN_Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Shelby County TN
    Posts
    11,134
    I'm diabetic as well and while I have never had this problem happen to me, I have heard of similar things happening to others.

    How often do you check your blood sugar? I check mine at least once a day. I would also suggest you start exercising if you do not do so already. Losing weight is the number one thing you can do to help with diabetes. I dropped 160 pounds and mine almost completely disappeared. My blood sugar is now almost always normal unless i do something stupid like not watch what I eat or drink. Lift some moderate weights. it will help more than you can imagine with the diabetes and will improve your grip which helps with shooting more accurately.

    But to be honest, if you are hypoglycemic, then you aren't diabetic. There may be some different things you can do. I'd recommend going to see your doctor.
    ,=====o00o _
    //___l__,\____\,__
    l_--- \___l---[]lllllll[]
    (o)_)-o- (o)_)--o-)_)

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array automatic slim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    The western edge of The Confederacy
    Posts
    2,198
    You exibited classic symtoms of low blood sugar. You may have also noticed a racing pulse and vision problems. The best remedy is fruit juice. The sugar from it will enter your bloodstream quickly, but it may still take as long as 1/2 hour for you to feel normal. A good precaution is to eat a good breakfast. After sleeping all night your sugar tends to bottom out in the AM. Monitor your sugar 2-3 times a day. Just a word of warning, if your sugar falls below 50 you may loose conciousness.
    "First gallant South Carolina nobly made the stand."
    Edge of Darkness

  13. #13
    Senior Member Array Beans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    AZ Border Territory,
    Posts
    1,002
    I have been a diagnosed diabetic since December 1999. Type II.

    What works for you may not work for me. Besides pure sugar hard candy that I carry in my vehicles, I also carry several bags of Planters peanuts. I normally can tell when I am headed in that direction before it get to me. The peanuts have rescued me several times when I started to "get the feeling" I have only had one bad scare, when I was still trying to get regulated. I walked quickly into a local 7-11 store and then I SUCKED/inhaled down a 20 ox bottle of regular coke and set down for a spell. It worked.

    Damm Agent Orange

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array swinokur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    939
    I carry a tube of cake frosting in my pocket. A nurse suggested it years ago. This disease is scary. I have lost a toe and continue to have foot problems associated with neuropathy.

    Take care of yourselves

  15. #15
    Member Array richgp100z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Omaha,Ne.
    Posts
    116
    I am also a type one diabetic that has been one for 40 years and have gone thru,major heart attack at age 43,went on hemo-dialysis in 2-9-98,had lung problems,am disabled[permantly],had kidney transplat3-26-07,had 2 amputations,one middle toe turned black in 08,and below knee amputation on July of 09. Otherwise than that,yes,I have had alot of low sugars but,you have to watch what you do. 1. DO NOT SMOKE ANYTHING!!!!! Smokingof cigarettes,cigars,pipe tabaco,can lead to shrinking of the blood vessels in your bodies. Eat right foods. Watch Cholesterals readings. Watch A1C readings. Try to keep your blood sugars A1C around 6.0-7.5 if at all possible because if you do not,you will be having foot and arterial problems in your legs to start with. So all of you diabetics,watch what you do and have a good sober time at the range and keep healthy with your diabetes. richgp100z

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Anybody else see this weird thing on YouTube?
    By paramedic70002 in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: August 21st, 2010, 05:05 PM
  2. Interesting thing happened
    By Tyler11B in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: July 24th, 2010, 06:46 PM
  3. Funny thing just happened...
    By Pro2A in forum Open Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: October 1st, 2009, 11:57 PM
  4. The funniest thing happened
    By luvmyglock in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: January 27th, 2009, 04:56 AM

Search tags for this page

can a diabetic conceal and carry

,

can diabetics carry a gun

,

can people with diabetes carry concealed

,

diabetic type 1 concealed handgun

,

sugar drop after gbs

Click on a term to search for related topics.