Sad state of the press in the US.

Sad state of the press in the US.

This is a discussion on Sad state of the press in the US. within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I know newspapers are hurting right now but perhaps if they would do enough research to convince their readers that they were at least reporting ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Sad state of the press in the US.

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array TedBeau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Bay City
    Posts
    2,302

    Sad state of the press in the US.

    I know newspapers are hurting right now but perhaps if they would do enough research to convince their readers that they were at least reporting accurate facts more people would buy the paper.
    This is from our local fishwrap:

    http://www.mlive.com/news/bay-city/i...er_was_ac.html

    On June 5, Bay City police officers received an anonymous call that Yanna was wearing a Taser on his belt while working as a clerk at Old Town Party Store, 204 S. Henry St. Officers responded and confiscated the electric weapon from Yanna, court records show.
    AND THIS;

    He claims that when police confiscated his weapon, a coworker at the party store was carrying a handgun on his hip, which police saw, but did not seize. Michigan residents with a concealed weapons permit are allowed to carry firearms.
    Actually Michigan law allows any non-felon, non-mental patient etc, to open carry. And the store owner could concealed carry in his house or place of business without a CPL. He should have just gotten a gun and carried that.


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array Rollo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    3,007
    Bad reporting has nothing to do with my newspapers are hurting. That wonderful invention called the internet has pretty much sealed their fate. Plus the internet has the added benefit of letting bad reporting reach FAR more people much faster.
    -It is a seriously scary thought that there are subsets of American society that think being intellectual is a BAD thing...

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array gottabkiddin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    North Georgia
    Posts
    7,077
    as well as following up on said "bad reporting" Now folks can do serious research on their own and make informed decisions on what's biased and what's not.....
    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." Luke 22:36

    "If a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so." Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4
    Distinguished Member
    Array fastk9dad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Location: Location:
    Posts
    1,554
    Is it bad reporting or rather selective reporting to suit their own particular agenda?

  5. #5
    Member Array luke213's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Channing, Michigan
    Posts
    406
    Well on top of the reporting it's a really bad law that is the problem. Michigan has good CPL rules(not great, it's not constitutional carry), good reciprocity, open carry, etc. But you can't own pepper spray over 2%(or larger than 35grams by memory), not a stun gun, or expanding baton.

    Just stupid legislation that I can carry my 1911 locked and loaded, but pepper spray that is 10% on my wife's keychain would be illegal...

    Bad law, bad paper as well, but the media it seems doesn't have very many good outlets that report news these days without making up the story as it fits their agenda.

    Luke

  6. #6
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Hiding inside a bottle of Jim Beam Black.
    Posts
    17,646
    What this media business needs now, more than ever, is another Walter Cronkite. The media needs to follow Jack Webb's advice: "Just the facts, ma'am."

    It's gotten so bad I barely listen to any of the networks anymore. FOX is so far right it's falling off the edge of the earth. MSNBC lives only to slam FOX with the exact opposite views. CNN plays the "ride-the-crest-of-popular-opinion" game, swinging like door in the wind. I don't think any news media reports "just the facts."
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

  7. #7
    Distinguished Member Array bigmacque's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,889
    I do agree with OldVet, the media does need to learn how to report again.

    But I have to be honest with you .... I don't see anything in the article cited in the OP that is really incorrect. Maybe not quite as succinct, as complete as we might like, but it's not like it's an outright fabrication.
    I'm in favor of gun control -- I think every citizen should have control of a gun.
    1 Thess. 5:16-18

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array Sig35seven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,115
    They push the most sensational stories they possibly can even if they have to fabricate it by selective editing.
    Fear sells and they don't mind artificially spicing it up if it will bring ratings and they can make more money.

    I believe the power of the media can be a very dangerous thing.
    "Confidence is food for the wise man but liquor for the fool"

  9. #9
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    12,110
    You can't get good reporting if the general level of teaching of history, government, economics, at the Junior HS and High School Level stinks. You can't get good reporting if journalisms schools concentrate their curriculum only on the things specifically relevant to journalism such as writing, editing, marketing, publishing, to the exclusion of requiring other courses in political science, law, business, accounting, science, and many more subjects. (Of course, not every journalism student needs to know each, but each journalism student should be expert in one additional discipline; e.g., city management, health care, and so on.) I guess the more we use the net instead of buying print, the harder we make it for the owners of news outlets to hire good help.

    As its stands now, too many stories I see look as if they were either written by a 16 y.o. or naive 21 y.o., or they were written by someone who learned English at school in SE Asia.

    There is a special skill required for headline writing too. Very often I see headlines which are unrelated to the story, or which slant the reader's viewpoint before they get to the story. E.g., Headlines which are written as: "US Bombs Pakistan Again" v "US Strikes Al Quaida Camp in Pakistan" v "Possible Terrorist Target Hit in NW Pakistan," all may be the top line for the same story, but the person who just does a quick look will get different meanings from each headline.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Array AlexHassin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    the North East
    Posts
    552
    Personally I am more the person that fallows international news through the BBC and Al-Jazeera. I like that you can get those almost anywhere. I do read the WSJ and sometimes the NYT for city news.

  11. #11
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    12,110
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexHassin View Post
    Personally I am more the person that fallows international news through the BBC and Al-Jazeera. I like that you can get those almost anywhere. I do read the WSJ and sometimes the NYT for city news.
    We get very very poor international news. Though I doubt that AJ does a fair and reasonable job in certain subject matter, and BBC sometimes isn't much better than our own press, I applaud your reading of various papers with divergent viewpoints as that is the only way to get the big picture.

  12. #12
    Ex Member Array MadMac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,095
    Can never get enough of this:


  13. #13
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Hiding inside a bottle of Jim Beam Black.
    Posts
    17,646
    Hopyard pretty much nailed it with the education level (or lack of). Like the reporter who said the victim had been found "passed out dead." Well then, wake him up!
    Or the bright one when asking questions with an on-scene reporter during the Columbia accident. She asked the on-scener, standing over the piece of charred, smoking wreckage, if it smelled hot. Smelled hot? Perhaps "smelled burnt"?
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,051
    It's very complicated.

    First off, you have to understand how newspapers work. Most people have no idea.

    In the Goode Olde Days of Yore, there were editors and copyeditors and fact-checkers. These positions are virtually obsolete. The NYT and to a lesser extent the WSJ still employ some. Most other papers eliminated these job functions.

    Most US papers - and probably your daily rag - are assembled by interns, 18-20 year-olds working long hours for dirt pay, assembling copy on screen and making the copy fit, then sending it to production. Please understand that nobody is reading anything before it goes to press. Nobody has an agenda. There are no hidden forces at work, no evil Masters of the Media seeking to control content.

    They have white space to fill, they fill it, and run with it. Whatever the hell it is.

    Reporters now are largely working out of their cars, filing text and photos via the internet, grabbing copy on the fly. Some of it is already outsourced to India. Nobody's in control and the product, like pretty much everything else in our lives, is being cheapened and commoditized. It's important that we, as Americans, rediscover and learn to appreciate the value of the Fourth Estate.

    Because, as you see before your eyes, when the media fails, we all fail.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

  15. #15
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    12,110
    Quote Originally Posted by shockwave View Post
    It's important that we, as Americans, rediscover and learn to appreciate the value of the Fourth Estate.
    Because, as you see before your eyes, when the media fails, we all fail.
    Spot on. We need to relearn the reason why the media is known here as the fourth estate.
    That it has an importance right up there with the three formal branches of government. The Press is a fourth (informal) branch of government. The one that is designed --by assured freedom-- to be a watchdog.

    Its pretty sad to watch the watchdog become embroiled as it has in supporting one or another side in the news section instead of the opinion section.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Need some help with a Lee Press... anyone??
    By ecorrigan in forum Reloading
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: March 7th, 2010, 03:14 AM
  2. Press Check
    By Rob99VMI04 in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: January 19th, 2008, 10:50 AM
  3. Got my first press
    By sjp2452 in forum Reloading
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: September 15th, 2007, 05:02 PM
  4. Hot off the press!
    By P95Carry in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: March 27th, 2006, 03:18 PM
  5. Some better press - and re FL
    By P95Carry in forum The Second Amendment & Gun Legislation Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: October 19th, 2005, 06:43 PM