Insulin and concealed carry

This is a discussion on Insulin and concealed carry within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; As a type II Diabetic, I always carry some Glucose tablets, for low blood sugar episodes. I'm under such tight control, with meds that if ...

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 29 of 29

Thread: Insulin and concealed carry

  1. #16
    VIP Member
    Array TX-JB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    Posts
    5,738
    As a type II Diabetic, I always carry some Glucose tablets, for low blood sugar episodes. I'm under such tight control, with meds that if I miss lunch, I'll have an episode around 4pm. The tablets come in tubes that hold about 10-12 and are less than 2 bucks. I buy the large size at Walmart and refill the tubes.
    "Texas can make it without the United States, but the United States can't make it without Texas!".... Sam Houston

    Retired LEO
    Firearms Instructor
    NRA Life Member

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #17
    Member Array l1a1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    293
    Thanks for all the responses. A lot of good advice. +1 on the driving. A car is certainly more lethal than the most powerful handcannon. Thankfully my lows come on slowly with plenty of warning.

  4. #18
    Member Array ZeBool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    204
    My father was diagnosed with diabetes a few years back. It was very frightening at first, but with proper education and monitoring all will be well for you. My father carries, shoots, hunts and fishes, and continues to do everything he always has (excluding some dietary changes). He told me once that something like diabetes only wins if YOU let it win. He has not. Neither should you.

    As a side note, I think that all of the positive responses to this question from the various members of this forum speak volumes for the class and integrity of everyone here, including the moderators. This would have been locked on other forums. Just wanted to come out of lurk and share that. Best of luck OP!

  5. #19
    Member Array Bear67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Greater Texas
    Posts
    172
    I have been Type II diabetic for over 10 years and currently I take 4 insulin injections per day and this has controlled by blood sugar better than any medication taken previously. Your reaction to low blood sugar depends upon how your body reacts and how you recognize when your blood sugar is starting down into dangerously low readings. I can feel when mine is getting low and always have something in the truck, house, or on my person to bring it up. ( I primarily carry tubes of cake icing as it is inexpensive, available, and what we carried when I was a volunteer paramedic with VFD)

    I carry, I shoot, I hunt, I drive, I operate heavy equipment, I climb rocks and go into caves, but I have never let my blood sugar get to a level that compromises either my safety, my family or the public. I know diabetics that do not have built in warnings in their systems to warn them of dangerous levels--so I feel that each diabetic must look at his health and his reaction to blood sugar changes and make his own decisions. Only you and sometimes your Doctor know your limitations.

    Good luck with managing your disease. But we do not need big brother telling us how we can live our lives with our disease. May individual
    freedom rule

  6. #20
    Member Array Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NW Oregon
    Posts
    320
    Quote Originally Posted by l1a1 View Post
    Thanks for all the responses. A lot of good advice. +1 on the driving. A car is certainly more lethal than the most powerful handcannon. Thankfully my lows come on slowly with plenty of warning.
    Police officers are trained to ask, when stopping a possible DUI, to ask the driver if he or she is diabetic. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) exhibits some of the same signs and symptoms as intoxication.

    I've been diagnosed with type 2 for about 10 years and insulin dependent for about 3 years. I'm fortunate that I can feel the onset of low blood glucose early and like many others here, keep what I call my "Crash Kit" handy to bring it back up. I wear a medic alert dog tag as anyone with diabetes should. I carry every day, every where, without a second thought.
    Sui juris
    U.S. Navy Veteran '65-'69
    Retired Police Detective '71 - '01
    LEOSA Certified
    NRA Life Member / SAF Member
    U.S. Constitution (c) 1791, All Rights Reserved.

  7. #21
    Senior Member Array swinokur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    935
    20 year Insulin dependent Diabetic

    1. ALWAYS have your glucometer with you.
    2. I keep a small tube of cake icing in my pocket for hypoglycemic situations

    Many diabetics (myself included) start out being able to sense the onset of a hypoglycemic episode. Over time, your body gets used to it and the signs will diminish. That's why you need your glucometer with you at all times. I can tell but it's much more subtle than when I was first diagnosed.

    Take care of yourselves. You can live with this disease and have a full life. I'm proof.

  8. #22
    VIP Member Array TedBeau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Bay City
    Posts
    2,269
    Quote Originally Posted by NC Bullseye View Post
    If it's paramedics or first responders that find you don't sweat it. They are almost always well versed in how to secure a firearm on an unresponsive patient. It happens often not only due to medical conditions but auto accidents etc. Just make sure you have your med alert bracelet or necklace. Kudos on planning ahead.
    Don't forget your ccw badge!

    Sorry I couldn't resist!

    Seriously I also am diabetic but I am type 2, and do not take insulin.
    I would think that the things the original poster mentioned about keeping close tabs on blood surgars, and having a source of carbs available would actually be more important when it comes to driving a car. The gun is on safe in a holster, the car is in gear and running. Which would do more damage if the operator passes out?

    My wife's mother did not get her drivers license until she was over 60 years old because when she was a teen they did not allow diabetics to drive.

  9. #23
    Senior Member Array DoctorBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    585
    Quote Originally Posted by l1a1 View Post
    Does anyone have anything to add? A little concerned about a worst case scenario of low blood sugar and passing out. Certainly whoever would find me would discover my weapon before they made it to my wallet for ID, CCW permit and emergency contact card. This hasn't happened ever and my sugar is now under excellent control with predictable results. Just food for thought.
    Actually, the worst case scenario is getting hypoglycemic and NOT passing out. I have often seen diabetics get hypoglycemic and act VERY strangely without passing out. Medical culture has many epic stories of a diabetic brought to the ED by police, etc. becasue s/he was acting in a very strange way in public. Imagine what my happen if you got hypoglycemic and decided to start waving your gun around?

    Parenthetically, there is little to no evidence that tight control of blood sugar does anything good for type 2 diabetics. It doesn't lower stroke, heart attack risk, kidney disease, vision problems, etc. It just causes more episodes of hypoglycemia. Over the next few years, you will see a trend away from tight control toward moderate control and a better quality of life.

  10. #24
    Member Array Kenpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    95
    I woke up one morning to find that my Father had purchased a Glock 23 the day before. I asked him about the details of the purchase and he admitted to me that he remembers walking into the shop and finding the Glock and that is it. He is type 2, and had a low blood sugar incident while there. He assumes that he went into autopilot and purchased the pistol and then drove home. I was looking at the Glock a commented to him that it was used. He swore up and down that he was looking at a new pistol to buy and the guy at the shop took advantage of him. He now takes better care of himself.
    The Dragon has time and experience. Maturity has given him knowledge, strength, skill, wisdom and inner peace.
    Glock 26 Certified Glock Armorer
    Mossberg 590 12 ga.

  11. #25
    Senior Member Array The Fish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    West Palm Beach, Florida
    Posts
    682
    Kenpo;
    With all due respect for your Dad, your story is frightening.
    Thankfully he didn't try to fire the weapon while hypoglycemic (sp.).
    Glad to hear he now takes better care.
    BTW,I am a diabetic
    " Keep On Packin' On The Bimah"

  12. #26
    Member Array l1a1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    293
    Again, Thanks to all for the comments and advice. I do much more driving at this point than actual work. Blood sugar control is fantastic on my current regimen and haven't had a serious low since I started insulin. The lows I have had were on the low side of normal.

    DrBob - What do you consider tight or moderate control? My before meal weekly/monthly average is right around 100 give or take. A1c is headed the right direction though.

  13. #27
    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Lansing Mi
    Posts
    7,165
    Just remember that all diabetics are different. I have been a type 1 for 10 years now. When I was admitted to the hospital my blood sugar was 717. I understand the fear, and emotion that comes with this disease. Feelings that diabetics have when there sugars get out of whack is hard to understand. My advise is to know your bodies feelings and test when something seems strange. You will get the hang of it. Good luck Bro
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

    Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means, that you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you......

  14. #28
    Member Array PcMakr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    122
    Bracelets or necklaces from the MedicAlert Foundation also come with an ID card with your information on it. The information includes: contacts (doctor & family member and their phone numbers), medical information, medications & dosages, and a toll-free, 24 hr. number for additional information available to emergency support personnel only. URL is Medical ID Jewelry and Services by MedicAlert Foundation. No, I do not work or represent them in any way. I have had to use their services in the past and it was of benefit to me. I wear the bracelet and keep the card next to my DL and CCL. It costs $25 or $30 per year. What is that information worth to you if your life is on the line?

    It is also beneficial to have the information available if you have other health risks as well, such as medication allergies, heart problems, sleep apnea, epilepsy, narcolepsy, etc. Even if you do not feel the need to get a bracelet/necklace and card, if you have any medical conditions or regular medications for a condition, you should keep a piece of paper in you billfold, next to your drivers license, with the conditions, meds, and dosages. In Kansas they even have/or had a program to keep that information in your glove compartment in a yellow envelope. Had a little yellow sunflower decal to put in the back window so that first responders would know you might have a medical condition requiring attention.

  15. #29
    Senior Member Array rolyat63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Tampa Bay
    Posts
    887
    FYSA - in FL you can register your emergency info and medical data online tied to your drivers license. Not the same as the bracelet/necklace but it is another layer in case you forget.
    rolyat63
    NRA Certified Pistol Instructor

    A gun in the hand is a million times more valuable than a cop on the phone!

    FL Concealed Weapon or Firearm Program

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Insulin and concealed carry
    By l1a1 in forum Bob & Terry's Place
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: February 15th, 2011, 12:57 AM
  2. New P239 - I need ideas for a very concealed undetectable holster for Concealed Carry
    By kashton in forum Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: January 14th, 2009, 07:53 PM

Search tags for this page

can a diabetic get a ccw
,
can a people carry a firearm if they are taking insulin
,

can diabetics carry a gun

,

conceal weapons and diabetic

,
concealed carry firearm with an insulin pump
,

diabetes and concealed carry

,
diabetic gun permits
,
diabetics and ccw
,
diabetics carrying guns
,

insulin defensive

,
medical id bracelets with hidden compartment
,

type 1 diabetes concealed weapons

Click on a term to search for related topics.