Insulin and concealed carry

Insulin and concealed carry

This is a discussion on Insulin and concealed carry within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Not sure where to post this exactly but here goes. Can anyone give me tips on insulin dependence and concealed carry? I have had my ...

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Thread: Insulin and concealed carry

  1. #1
    Member Array l1a1's Avatar
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    Insulin and concealed carry

    Not sure where to post this exactly but here goes. Can anyone give me tips on insulin dependence and concealed carry? I have had my CCW for a couple of years but have recently started insulin to treat type II diabetes. I believe the amount of insulin is just to supplement what I already make naturally.

    The only things I have thought of as of yet are...
    a. Careful monitoring of blood sugar and diligant use of prescribed meds.
    b. ALWAYS have access to a source of carbs to raise the blood sugar if need be
    due to an enexpected hypoglecimic incident.
    c. Emergency contact info stating I am diabetic.

    Does anyone have anything to add? A little concerned about a worst case scenario of low blood sugar and passing out. Certainly whoever would find me would discover my weapon before they made it to my wallet for ID, CCW permit and emergency contact card. This hasn't happened ever and my sugar is now under excellent control with predictable results. Just food for thought.


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    Quote Originally Posted by l1a1 View Post
    Not sure where to post this exactly but here goes. Can anyone give me tips on insulin dependence and concealed carry? I have had my CCW for a couple of years but have recently started insulin to treat type II diabetes. I believe the amount of insulin is just to supplement what I already make naturally.

    The only things I have thought of as of yet are...
    a. Careful monitoring of blood sugar and diligant use of prescribed meds.
    b. ALWAYS have access to a source of carbs to raise the blood sugar if need be
    due to an enexpected hypoglecimic incident.
    c. Emergency contact info stating I am diabetic.

    Does anyone have anything to add? A little concerned about a worst case scenario of low blood sugar and passing out. Certainly whoever would find me would discover my weapon before they made it to my wallet for ID, CCW permit and emergency contact card. This hasn't happened ever and my sugar is now under excellent control with predictable results. Just food for thought.
    Consider a Medic Alert or similar bracelet.

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array varob's Avatar
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    Sound like you have it covered.

    Can you feel your blood sugar getting low? I ask because I know some diabetics who can't and tend to fall out with no notice.
    Don't believe what you hear and only half of what you see!
    -Tony Soprano

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    VIP Member Array NC Bullseye's Avatar
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    If it's paramedics or first responders that find you don't sweat it. They are almost always well versed in how to secure a firearm on an unresponsive patient. It happens often not only due to medical conditions but auto accidents etc. Just make sure you have your med alert bracelet or necklace. Kudos on planning ahead.

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    Member Array J0eyg86's Avatar
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    only thing I would say is be mindful & keep good record for first few weeks to months for the dr new meds can be a little touchy to get just right. They also make these things called glucose tabs they may be good to carry but ask ur dr about them

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    Member Array l1a1's Avatar
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    I have been on insulin for approximately 2 months and the low blood sugars are pretty evident when they hit. Nothing unmanagable though. It appears that the my avg before meal blood glucose is even dropping gradually. My sugar control for the last 2 months has been very good and no real serious lows to speak of.

    I will look into the Medic alert necklace. Maybe I can keep that with my CCW Badge and/or sash!

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    Member Array mustang00066's Avatar
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    Type I diabetic here for 20 of my 27 years. Best thing in the world is the dexcom 7 continuous glucose monitoring system. You can set alarms if your blood is dropping/climbing too fast or goes below/above a certain level.

    I had never had any problems but one night the perfect storm happened and I wasn't conscious in the morning. A bunch of grape juice later poured down in my mouth from my wife as luckily family members were around to hold me down (we were on vacation).

    This sensor has a little dealy that sticks on you that you change weekly and it wirelessly transmits to the device every five minutes what your blood sugar is. Amazing.

    http://www.dexcom.com/products

    Maybe it's not necessary for type II but I'd certainly look into it.
    "The best we can hope for concerning the people at large is that they be properly armed."
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    Member Array l1a1's Avatar
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    Thanks Stang. Sounds pretty neat.

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    The key here is knowing how your particular body handles insulin and sugar, and making sure you eat and take your meds properly.

    There is no reason being an insulin dependent diabetic should prevent you from doing whatever you want to do, so long as you actively manage your blood sugars.

    Matt
    Battle Plan (n) - a list of things that aren't going to happen if you are attacked.
    Blame it on Sixto - now that is a viable plan.

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    Ex Member Array Kerby's Avatar
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    I am a type II also, one thing I will say is react if you feel a low sugar starting, I know when they are on the way yet if I hesitate to bring it up I can become confused as to what is going in within 15 min or so... Monitor it and keep the candy bar with you..... GOOD LUCK

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    Ex Member Array Kerby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mustang00066 View Post
    Type I diabetic here for 20 of my 27 years. Best thing in the world is the dexcom 7 continuous glucose monitoring system. You can set alarms if your blood is dropping/climbing too fast or goes below/above a certain level.

    I had never had any problems but one night the perfect storm happened and I wasn't conscious in the morning. A bunch of grape juice later poured down in my mouth from my wife as luckily family members were around to hold me down (we were on vacation).

    This sensor has a little dealy that sticks on you that you change weekly and it wirelessly transmits to the device every five minutes what your blood sugar is. Amazing.

    http://www.dexcom.com/products

    Maybe it's not necessary for type II but I'd certainly look into it.
    Wow that is great!

  12. #12
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    My wife is a Type-1, and the best thing we've found for emergency carbs is the small cans of Tree Top apple juice. They do not require refrigeration, and provide fast-acting carbs.

    A medical id bracelet/necklace is a good idea. My wife didn't wear one for a long time, but she finally found one that was feminine enough for daily wear.

    And CGMs (constant glucose monitors) are a god-send. In the first month she's was on one, her A1C dropped a full point. Hers is the Medtronic model that syncs directly with her insulin pump. And insurance companies are starting to really back them due to the effect they have on preventing future complications by helping maintain good glucose levels.

    The leaps in technology for diabetic treatment right now are amazing.

    Good luck and God bless!

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    Senior Member Array The Fish's Avatar
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    A couple of comments;
    1) If you are worried about low blood sugar,you should be worried about driving also.
    2)Make sure you know your personal low sugar symptoms;shakiness,profuse sweating etc. and be alert for them.
    If you can't check your sugar when you feel the symptoms then just take some sugar till you can but don't wait long to check.
    3)ALWAYS have a sugar source with you and in lots of places;gym bag,glove compartment,range bag etc.

    As you might imagine,I am speaking from experience.
    " Keep On Packin' On The Bimah"

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    My best friend is a brittle diabetic. He was diagnosed as having developed it from exposure to agent orange during his tour in Viet Nam. He has considerable trouble keeping his insulin balanced even though he frequently checks his blood. When he goes low, he often gets confused, disoriented and argumentative. Once he passed out while driving and totaled his vehicle. Although he has his CW permit, he does not carry. We have never discussed it but I believe he realizes how he gets and doesn't want to take the risk of doing something he might regret when his blood sugars are normal. I would advise consulting with your endocrinologist and having him assess your risk of impaired judgment if you go too low.

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    My mother was one of those who could not detect the oncoming of a reaction. One moment she'd be fine and, literally, in a matters of seconds, you'd think she was skunk drunk. More than once, while out in public, she'd have a reaction and the cops would arrive and treat her as a drunkard until they saw the medic alert necklace we insisted she wear. After one event where it wasn't noticed, she changed to a more obvious bracelet. I cannot endorse enough the need for any diabetic to wear such an alert.

    You will learn how you react and if you can feel a reaction coming. Due to how suddenly her reactions happened, a ccw for my mom would have been out of the question.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

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