One In The Chamber Check List

This is a discussion on One In The Chamber Check List within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Been reading the long "Do you keep one in the chamber?" thread. I've been carrying for a couple months now without one in the pipe ...

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Thread: One In The Chamber Check List

  1. #1
    Member Array Rugerguy's Avatar
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    One In The Chamber Check List

    Been reading the long "Do you keep one in the chamber?" thread. I've been carrying for a couple months now without one in the pipe XDM. I have a nice OWB with the finger button release. (forgot brand) anyway, chambering one and walking around, going to the store etc seems like a hurdle. What should i be sure of and/or practice drills to make sure i'm doing all I can to prevent an AD. Yeah I'm a newb.

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    Member Array MadlyAlive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rugerguy View Post
    Been reading the long "Do you keep one in the chamber?" thread. I've been carrying for a couple months now without one in the pipe XDM. I have a nice OWB with the finger button release. (forgot brand) anyway, chambering one and walking around, going to the store etc seems like a hurdle. What should i be sure of and/or practice drills to make sure i'm doing all I can to prevent an AD. Yeah I'm a newb.
    Not sure what you mean by it being a hurdle...

    If you have a trigger guard on your holster, you're fine.

    Practice unholstering your gun at home with no magazine and the chamber empty.

    And keep your finger off the trigger when unholstering your weapon until you're ready to fire.

  4. #3
    New Member Array mtmag's Avatar
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    Keep your finger off the trigger is the best advice I can give you. I had to learn to do that also. It's tough thinking about it, at least for the first couple weeks, after that I got used to it. Every time you think about putting your hand on that piece also think about keeping your finger out of the trigger guard, about keeping the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, and do it all slowly and deliberately. Sometimes we get so used to things that we don't think about them anymore, we just go on cruise control, that is when we get ourselves into situations.
    Be safe,
    MTMAG

  5. #4
    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    keep the finger off the trigger, these newfangled things dont work unless you hit that boom switch, I carry an XDM on duty locked and loaded, rolling around on the ground throwing people around and being thrown around and nothing has set that thing off unless i wanted it to go off, your fine
    "The value you put on the lost will be determined by the sacrifice you are willing to make to seek them until they are found."

  6. #5
    Distinguished Member Array Fitch's Avatar
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    When out and about carrying a gun, any gun, it is most important, keep your hands off the gun unless you needed it for defense. Don't touch it. Leave it in the holster. Don't take it out for any reason unless you need it for self defense. Don't show it to people, don't take it out and show it to friends, leave it in the holster. If you aren't touching it, it won't go off. If you aren't handling it it won't go off.

    Second, think about what you are doing when you handle the gun to put it in the holster or remove it when disarming at night, or in a stall in a public restroom. Engage brain - it's your most important safety equipment. Don't be handling the gun and thinking about something else. Focus on the gun and your hands. No bopping to music, no nothing but paying attention to the gun and what you are doing with it. As part of your thinking about what you are doing at that moment, pay attention to the direction the muzzle is pointed. Is your SO on the other side of that wall sleeping? Kids? Then point it someplace else. Think about what the safe direction is at any locations in your residence where you handle the gun. Loading, unloading and clearing, putting it in a drawer, or safe, should be done knowing what the safe direction is at that location.

    Third, keep your finger off the trigger. I mean don't touch the trigger, period, unless you intend to fire the weapon. If you wipe the trigger off, and then carry the gun for a month with out unloading it, your finger prints should not be on the trigger when you unload it.

    Fourth, I pack Glocks. Always with one in the chamber. A Glock has no safety, but it is very predictable. It will always go off when you pull the trigger with a round in the chamber. It will never go off if you don't pull the trigger. Therefore, minimize access to the trigger unless you have it in your hand for defensive purposes. If you aren't handling the gun, you don't have access to the trigger. If the gun is in a proper carry holster, the holster covers the trigger and you don't have access to the trigger.

    When I remove the gun from my carry holster I stick it in what amounts to a pocket holster that completely covers the trigger before I ever set it down. That protects the trigger - it can't be touched to set the gun off if it slips while carrying it to the night stand, or to the exercise room with coffee in the other hand, etc. When loaded with one in the chamber it is either in my carry holster or the pocket holster for handling. I never leave it lying around with the trigger exposed. If fingers can't get to the trigger, it won't go off.

    Fitch
    “The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety), by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.” by H. L. Mencken

  7. #6
    Member Array 3rik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rugerguy View Post
    Been reading the long "Do you keep one in the chamber?" thread. I've been carrying for a couple months now without one in the pipe XDM. I have a nice OWB with the finger button release. (forgot brand) anyway, chambering one and walking around, going to the store etc seems like a hurdle. What should i be sure of and/or practice drills to make sure i'm doing all I can to prevent an AD. Yeah I'm a newb.
    Buy some snap-caps if you haven't already. Unload your pistol and store any and all ammo in another room in the house temporarily. With the snap caps practice loading, charging and unloading your weapon repeatedly while keeping your finger off the trigger at all times until you are 110% confident in your safety and the safety functions of your gun. This may take a day, may take a week. Eventually, with practice you will familiarize yourself enough to carry one in the pipe without undue concern.
    "Obviously you're not a golfer." -The Dude

  8. #7
    Member Array Rugerguy's Avatar
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    Thanks Fitch. Yeah over cautious is my approach. Even when cleaning I won't even point the field stripped frame in the direction of something or someone just to stay in the habit of being cautious. A way of life.

  9. #8
    Member Array chivvalry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fitch View Post
    When out and about carrying a gun, any gun, it is most important, keep your hands off the gun unless you needed it for defense. Don't touch it. Leave it in the holster. Don't take it out for any reason unless you need it for self defense. Don't show it to people, don't take it out and show it to friends, leave it in the holster. If you aren't touching it, it won't go off. If you aren't handling it it won't go off.

    Second, think about what you are doing when you handle the gun to put it in the holster or remove it when disarming at night, or in a stall in a public restroom. Engage brain - it's your most important safety equipment. Don't be handling the gun and thinking about something else. Focus on the gun and your hands. No bopping to music, no nothing but paying attention to the gun and what you are doing with it. As part of your thinking about what you are doing at that moment, pay attention to the direction the muzzle is pointed. Is your SO on the other side of that wall sleeping? Kids? Then point it someplace else. Think about what the safe direction is at any locations in your residence where you handle the gun. Loading, unloading and clearing, putting it in a drawer, or safe, should be done knowing what the safe direction is at that location.

    Third, keep your finger off the trigger. I mean don't touch the trigger, period, unless you intend to fire the weapon. If you wipe the trigger off, and then carry the gun for a month with out unloading it, your finger prints should not be on the trigger when you unload it.

    Fourth, I pack Glocks. Always with one in the chamber. A Glock has no safety, but it is very predictable. It will always go off when you pull the trigger with a round in the chamber. It will never go off if you don't pull the trigger. Therefore, minimize access to the trigger unless you have it in your hand for defensive purposes. If you aren't handling the gun, you don't have access to the trigger. If the gun is in a proper carry holster, the holster covers the trigger and you don't have access to the trigger.

    When I remove the gun from my carry holster I stick it in what amounts to a pocket holster that completely covers the trigger before I ever set it down. That protects the trigger - it can't be touched to set the gun off if it slips while carrying it to the night stand, or to the exercise room with coffee in the other hand, etc. When loaded with one in the chamber it is either in my carry holster or the pocket holster for handling. I never leave it lying around with the trigger exposed. If fingers can't get to the trigger, it won't go off.

    Fitch
    Very well said. No toucha da trigger and it won't go "bang"!
    "I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."
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  10. #9
    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    In the time it takes you to draw that weapon and rack the slide, some ex con can have a shank in you. Carry with one in the chamber and keep your finger off the trigger unless you are ready to fire. IMHO a finger release button holster like the serpa is not a beginner holster. If you are under pressure, and have to draw it you may have an ND. Just my honest opinion.

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    VIP Member Array TN_Mike's Avatar
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    I doubt I could add to what has already been stated. Don't touch the trigger is the best advice anyone can give.

    I suspect you are carrying in a Blackhawk SERPA. That's what I normally carry in. Good holster. Just practice with it with an unloaded gun and you should be good to go. Your XDM is designed to be carried with a round in the chamber.
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  12. #11
    VIP Member Array xXxplosive's Avatar
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    All of the above......and when or if your ever have to face down a threat at 6'-0" as I had to once in the dark of the morning, unless you have one IN......you'll be sayin' your prayers.

    Cocked and Locked.............. ALWAYS.

    Trouble doesn't make an appointment...........
    Last edited by xXxplosive; March 1st, 2011 at 09:44 PM.

  13. #12
    Senior Member Array Lotus222's Avatar
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    Solid advise. I'll take it all seriously. I haven't been carrying one in the pipe since I started as of recently. I am just not comfortable enough to do it yet. In due time, I would like to think I will be ready to do so. Maybe I need more practice at the range and making sure I have good habits with the firearm. Maybe I need to break the holster in a little more before I am comfortable enough to not want to adjust it all the time. Guess I'll find out soon enough.

  14. #13
    Senior Member Array JohnLeVick's Avatar
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    My recommendation is to get comfortable with Condition 1, then carry, not the other way around. Fumbling with chambering a round during massive adrenalin dump, when fractions of seconds count, is not a pleasant thought, and is likely to cause a jam, adding more seconds you don't have. The gun will NOT fire itself, and following Rule #3 will avoid any ADs.

  15. #14
    Distinguished Member Array AKsrule's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rugerguy View Post
    Been reading the long "Do you keep one in the chamber?" thread. I've been carrying for a couple months now without one in the pipe XDM. I have a nice OWB with the finger button release. (forgot brand) anyway, chambering one and walking around, going to the store etc seems like a hurdle. What should i be sure of and/or practice drills to make sure i'm doing all I can to prevent an AD. Yeah I'm a newb.
    Pardon me if I'm making an assumption but did you buy a handgun and start carrying it without having any sort of Training/Instruction from another shooter?

    Usually people who have actual experience with weapons aren't afraid of
    handling one that's loaded and secured in a holster.

    Read the manual - your XDM was designed to be carried safely while a round is chambered.

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  16. #15
    VIP Member Array tokerblue's Avatar
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    My advice would be to practice drawing (empty gun) hundreds if not thousands of times until proper trigger discipline is instinctual. Meaning that when you draw your firearm, your finger should not be on the trigger.

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