went to look at a glock today. had a bad experience

This is a discussion on went to look at a glock today. had a bad experience within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I've started doing business with a gun store that is farther away from me than two others. The reason is because of the exact thing ...

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Thread: went to look at a glock today. had a bad experience

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array 10thmtn's Avatar
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    I've started doing business with a gun store that is farther away from me than two others. The reason is because of the exact thing everyone else here has found - gun stores that are rude to anyone who isn't a regular "hanger on." Sad thing is that when I want to buy something, I know exactly what I want and I go there to do business - I don't have time to waste. I'm an "easy sale." I know what I want, I know the general price - just give me a reasonable quote, and done deal.

    The closest gun store has an indoor range - the only reason I go there anymore. Problem is the "regulars" (who hang around and don't buy anything) all smoke in the store - when I go there I can hardly breathe. My kid has asthma, so I have to change all my clothes when I get home due to the stink. Needless to say, I don't go there much anymore, which is a shame...I've been a customer of theirs for over 16 years.
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  3. #17
    Ex Member Array JOHNSMITH's Avatar
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    Amazing that there are stores like this. In the age of the online gun retailer, brick and mortar stores should be really upping their game - especially with newbies, who are the most dependable customer "stream" compared to a lot of the online outlets, which really work best for those who already know what they want.

    On the other hand, I have heard of people who go into gun stores, ask lots of questions, handle a bunch of guns, then eventually ask for the manufacturer's model/product number then walk out... so that they can go home and buy it online (never had the intention of buying it in the store). I think that is wrong.

  4. #18
    Member Array crabbys44's Avatar
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    I guess I'm lucky. When I was living in the Socialist state of IL, there was a local shop that was open and friendly, not just to me, but to my kids who were with me as well (23 and 15 years old). They had really good prices and were willing to look around if you wanted something they didn't have. Now that I'm in TX, I try to stop there every time I go back to visit family, 2 or 3 times a year. I don't like going to the big chains and get "help" from some pimply faced minimum wager that doesn't know a muzzle from a breach.

    BTW if I or any of mine were treated that rudely, they would know the mistake they made when neither I, nor any of my friends, nor any local PDs, nor any student I teach, will ever step foot in their establishment again. I admit having the urge to inform them how much business they lost, but they're not worth the time.

    Find a shop that treats you well and patronize their business exclusively. One gun and some ammo might not be a big deal to them, but it probably is to you. YMMV
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  5. #19
    New Member Array smlranger's Avatar
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    So it not just me :-). I've had the same experience in two local independent gun stores. They always had 2 - 3 guys just hanging around and it seemed they would rather gab with them than even say 'hello, may we help you?" In the past 2 years, I've bought 5 guns so I have been willing to spend some money. We also have a Gander Mountain store but, frankly, the guys in the shooting/hunting dept. need better customer skills. When I recently asked if they still had some of the American Eagle 9mm ammo advertised on sale, the guy at the gun counter told me it was not on sale. When I said I had seen it advertised in a newspaper insert, he told me I must have read it wrong. I found the flyer in another part of the store showing the ammo sale price and took it back to the gun counter. The salesman did not apologize, pointed to a shelf where I might find the ammo, turned and walked away.

    Recently, however, I have found an independent gun store run by a young fellow (early 30's) who could not be more helpful. He has good customer skills, has good knowledge of his stock, and seems appropriately eager to treat his customers well. His prices are competitive. So, I bought a new pistol from him and he has another on order for me now.

    At this point in my life (61 years old), you need to treat me at least decent to get me to part with my money.

  6. #20
    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
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    Ive been doin my research and from what it looks like a glock 26 would be perfect.
    You'd think so, wouldn't you. And then you get on the firing line and actually try to fire one of those things. It's like trying to hold onto a psychotic rabid squirrel shaped like a brick. It twists and turns, ripping your palms, and you can't get enough grip on it. Get one if you want, but at least try some other options in the same class.

    Do check out the Ruger SR9c, the HK, the Sig, and see if ergonomics work for you. Glocks are almost always heel heavy and the muzzles weigh nothing and flip around, giving bad feel and poor accuracy. Better guns will stay on point and fit your hand like a glove. Don't buy the Glock kool-aid until you've done range time with one and determined that it works for you.

    Hey - if a Glock feels good in your hand and is accurate and doesn't limp wrist on you and so forth, then get one. Otherwise, keep an open mind and check out the alternatives.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

  7. #21
    Member Array Bigpoppa48's Avatar
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    I also had a rude experience when I was getting ready to purchase my Gen4 Glock22 in October of last year. I didn't think twice about it and purchased from budsgunshop.com. I surely don't have to beg anybody to take my money and won't.

  8. #22
    Member Array Oldfart60's Avatar
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    I have found the best way to buy guns – my FFL is also a gun broker. He works out of his home and only charges $10 for a transfer. Like a lot of people, I do a lot of research and know what i want. I just call up Rick and tell him what I'm looking for and he gets back to me, usually the same day, with his best price. He has beat Buds prices every time, even with our state sales tax. If you live in Minneapolis, PM me and I'll give you his info.

  9. #23
    Senior Member Array Gun Bunny's Avatar
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    I don't know your location, but I used to go to a pawn shop in Glen Bernie that was on B & A . They are small but always treated me right.
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  10. #24
    Member Array charlie1826's Avatar
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    I have had basically the opposite experience from everyone. The worst I have been treated is at a major chain store. I have tried two locations in two states and have never seen good customer service at either; plus none of the employees seem to know what they are talking about anyway.
    The LGS that I go to now has one or two employees that are grumpy all the time but the rest are really nice. The store that I frequented when I was still in Utah was the best, I would go in to look at something or use the range and would end up talking with the employee for a while no matter which one it was (they would help other customers too if we were just chatting).
    Where I'm at now I just go to Cabela's for the most part, I go to the small store to compare but their prices usually aren't any better and Cabela's is closer. Most of their employees are good, except for the one guy that asked for my ID because you have to be 21 to buy handgun ammunition; I am over 21 but I was buying .308 rounds lol.

  11. #25
    Member Array sixsccw's Avatar
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    Guess it's just the luck of the draw -
    Two good shops I've been in in CT and NY both act like if you're not LE or look the part, you ain't s--t. And then I stumble into another REALLY good ole shop in CT, and the guy can't help you enough. Funny thing about that place - when was the last time you were in a public establishment in the NY Metro area where there was smoking inside? Well this place is like being in a refrigerator box with Dean Martin - JEEZ it's smokey, but the guy's great and stocks more firearms than I've seen anywhere.
    "I come in peace, I didn't bring artillery. But I am pleading with you with tears in my eyes: If you ---- with me, I'll kill you all."

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  12. #26
    Distinguished Member Array Fitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by willibeaman
    Ive been doin my research and from what it looks like a glock 26 would be perfect. so i figured id go check one out.
    You are looking at the a great carry gun in the Glock 26. My EDC is a Glock 26 with a +0 Pierce magazine floor plate to give my pinkie finger some purchase.

    Quote Originally Posted by shockwave View Post
    You'd think so, wouldn't you. And then you get on the firing line and actually try to fire one of those things. It's like trying to hold onto a psychotic rabid squirrel shaped like a brick. It twists and turns, ripping your palms, and you can't get enough grip on it. Get one if you want, but at least try some other options in the same class.
    Different guns work for different people. My experience with the
    G26 has been good from the first shot. I also have a G19 that I like a lot. Until I shot the two head to head in an IDPA classification match, I'd have said I'd shoot better with the 19, but I didn't.

    For me, the G26 is as close to perfect for fast double taps as any pistol I've ever fired. Aside from the Pierce grip extension, the pistol is factory stock. The combination of trigger pull, grip, the dynamics of my body/grip/ammo just "works".

    1/4 second splits with the holes seldom more than 2" apart, .6 second split to the head shot in a Mozambique (the first three targets of the IDPA classification match, stage 1). Shooting a classification match my times on the first three targets of stage 1 are just under 2 seconds, zero points off - slower than most, but I'm new at this. Shooting the same targets (G26) in practice from EDC concealment with my EDC holster my times run 2.3 to 2.5 seconds, zero points off. These are aimed shots, using sights, not point shooting. I routinely practice using my EDC holster (SuperTuck at 4:30) which isn't allowed in competition by my club.

    Twice now I've shot enough better in the first two stages with the 26 to outscore my performance with the 19. I do shoot the 19 better every time in the 3rd stage where the range is longer.

    Bottom line, try before buy. Handled right, the G26 is a tremendously capable EDC.

    Fitch
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  13. #27
    VIP Member Array PAcanis's Avatar
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    I'd agree with Rollo, too. LGSs can be clicky. Once you are "in" you are gold, but like any private business, they are going to evaluate the customer as they walk in the door. For whatever reason. I bought my first handgun at 21. Some out of the way place located next to the guy's house. I had an intro though, after getting "the look" I said so and so had told me about his place and I could see him lighten up a bit. Been buying guns from him 31 years later. However, it's not like he ignored me like your shop.

  14. #28
    Ex Member Array MadMac's Avatar
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    I work in sales. Now that I reflect on the go-get-an-education, grumpy store owner, I see that his system makes sense. He's a small, two-person shop with no range and no ccw classes. He has low overhead. He doesn't want to waste his day giving n00bs lessons, or waxing eloquent on the salient differences between Glocks and Kimbers. If he has to spend an hour yammering with some first-gun buyer, he's losing money. If he spends his time letting some penniless gawker fondle every piece in the shop, he has to clean all the handled weapons and knows he's not making a sale.

    He's catering to very specific customers. In sales, it's called "qualifying a buyer". There are entire books on the subject. Several boooks have shown that when sales people fail to make their quota, it's likely because they waste too much of their time selling to people (or organizations) either unwilling or unable to purchase the product.

    The shop that caters to n00bs has a range, a loaner program, and sponsors ccw classes. They get much more business, but they have much more overhead and insurance. They usually have at least four guys working the counter, and at least two are explaining the facts of life to new gun purchasers, one is helping some guy with his new jam-o-matic pistol in the range, and the last one is looking up prices online. This shop has higher insurance rates because of the range as well.

    It's a simple business decision, and I've come to respect it.

    As many of you have noted, gun and pawn shops seem to attract gun hobbiests with lots of spare time to stand around and jaw. Whether all these guys are retired, underemployed, or just trying to avoid going home is unknown, but they sure suck up a lot of selling time. Some shops seem fine with this knowing "Old Fred" will eventually buy something. Others chase them away as the time destroyers they are.

  15. #29
    VIP Member Array First Sgt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadMac View Post
    I work in sales. Now that I reflect on the go-get-an-education, grumpy store owner, I see that his system makes sense. Out of curiosity, how does this make sense? He is in business to sell a product. Totally ignoring a "potential" buyer is not only rude, but will eventually either be the downfall of his business or severely reduce his bottom line. He's a small, two-person shop with no range and no ccw classes. He has low overhead. He doesn't want to waste his day giving n00bs lessons, or waxing eloquent on the salient differences between Glocks and Kimbers. This owner has chosen to be in the business of selling weapons. If he has only another employee, no range, and no ccw classes, then it appears to me he has nothing but TIME to spend with ANY customer that chooses to grace his premises looking for a product. When you sell a product, you can be courteous, informative, and show an interest in the buyer whether or not he is a "noob" concerning his knowledge or an experienced and knowledgable product user. If he has to spend an hour yammering with some first-gun buyer, he's losing money. If he spends his time letting some penniless gawker fondle every piece in the shop, he has to clean all the handled weapons and knows he's not making a sale. Part of making a sale is spending time explaining the pros and cons of a product based on the customers questions. Unless you have picked the customer's pocket, you as an owner have NO knowledge as to whether or not the customer is a penniless gawker or a loaded buyer. As for having to wipe down/clean your product, that's a part of doing business. You can't know whether or not a sale will be made until YOU close the deal. I'm sure as an experienced sales person, you are familiar with the CLOSE! There is NO excuse for rudeness with any customer whether you have determined him to be a buyer or not. YOU have chosen the business you are in, therefore develop the proper attitude when conducting that business and that means the proper attitude with the customers as well as maintaining your product.

    He's catering to very specific customers. In sales, it's called "qualifying a buyer". There are entire books on the subject. Several boooks have shown that when sales people fail to make their quota, it's likely because they waste too much of their time selling to people (or organizations) either unwilling or unable to purchase the product. Hmmm...let me understand..someone has a small gun shop, catering to folks who are "shopping" for a weapon. Noob or experienced gun person, do ya think this might be the specific customer he is looking for? A sales person can "qualify a buyer" all he wants without being rude. It's called "time management" when there are other shoppers on the premises. I would think that if you are experienced in your product, then you are able to carry on one sales conversation with a Noob and one sales conversation with an experienced buyer without going into stress overload because you had two customers at once. These same books that you refer to as explaining why a sales person fails to meet their quota, also state that in addition to qualifying a buyer, things such as product knowledge and attitude contribute equally to the potential sale when it comes to how the CUSTOMER perceives the salesman. Most good sales people know that even if a person is unable or unwilling to purchase your product, their perception of YOUR attitude as a salesperson is relayed by word of mouth to all their friends. Do you think all of their friends are unable or unwilling to buy your product? I seriously doubt that. Do you think that you might lose a sale or two or three because of your attitude and that observation being passed on to other potential buyers by the person you were rude to? YUP. Do you think that might end up reflecting on your bottom profit line? Hmmmmm???

    The shop that caters to n00bs has a range, a loaner program, and sponsors ccw classes. They get much more business, but they have much more overhead and insurance. They usually have at least four guys working the counter, and at least two are explaining the facts of life to new gun purchasers, one is helping some guy with his new jam-o-matic pistol in the range, and the last one is looking up prices online. This shop has higher insurance rates because of the range as well. In my eyes, whether it's a chain operation or a mom n pop store, the bottom line is to sell to the customer. Number of employees, overhead, insuranced, etc is all part of being in business. If a person walks thru the door and can "fog a mirror" then they are, at that point, a potential customer until you the salesperson either makes the sale or they walk out the door. And even if you don't make the sale, there is nothing that says they won't return at a later time, simply because they appreciated you taking the time to talk/work with them on their inquiry and potential purchase.

    It's a simple business decision, and I've come to respect it. I respect NO ONE in sales that is rude, business decision or not.

    As many of you have noted, gun and pawn shops seem to attract gun hobbiests with lots of spare time to stand around and jaw. Whether all these guys are retired, underemployed, or just trying to avoid going home is unknown, but they sure suck up a lot of selling time. Some shops seem fine with this knowing "Old Fred" will eventually buy something. Others chase them away as the time destroyers they are.
    I've tried to address some of my feelings in BOLD above as it relates to the Original Post. I too have sales experience (22 years) in selling an "intangible" product and a "tangible" product. The way you conduct yourself and your sales technique, is as much a part of being a sales person as making the sale. If one is not happy with their buying experience, then by all means take your business elsewhere. I personally would NEVER buy from a salesperson who "thought" they had me prequalified, when in fact they didn't have a clue as to my intentions or ability to buy. Good luck in your future purchases... JMO
    Sometimes in life you have to stand your ground. It's a hard lesson to learn and even most adults don't get it, but in the end only I can be responsible for my life. If faced with any type of adversity, only I can overcome it. Waiting for someone else to take responsibility is a long fruitless wait.

  16. #30
    VIP Member Array Old School's Avatar
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    Cool

    I like to watch "Sons of Guns" and the way Stephanie deals with customers. These independently owned gun shops, bait shops and small golf shops could take a lesson from her in customer service. I have never understood why these small shops would not bend over backwards to be friendly, make a sale and get a repeat customer.

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