Can I carry too much?

This is a discussion on Can I carry too much? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by ampinf I'm 23 just out of college, I apply for, on average, two jobs a day. Bouncing is almost literally the only ...

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Thread: Can I carry too much?

  1. #46
    Senior Member Array canav844's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ampinf View Post
    I'm 23 just out of college, I apply for, on average, two jobs a day. Bouncing is almost literally the only job I could get, I worked in a liquor store post college too (much more dangerous). Everything I do in self defense is as a private citizen as the company won't take the liability of calling us security. Everything I carry is for self defense, not protecting the clubs interest.
    That's just the point though, you're acting as a security guard; it is a position of authority. You're job by it's nature is putting you into contact with people in a manner that is inclined to bring an attack on you personally or you as a position. You shoot a drunk that comes after you with a knife in front of or inside the club; and it's not a self defense shooting, it's a security guard shooting in self defense. Major difference in the rules that apply and liability that effects you and you best be licensed to be an armed security guard and not just have a carry permit. Again, legally you're supposed to have training to be in this position in an unarmed capacity, that should have covered this topic, and the armed security license should have gone into great detail on this. You need to get in touch with those that trained you and your employer (maybe the club maybe a security agency) and find out what the specific insurance policy that covers you allows you to carry on duty, it will be spelled out at some level. The internet is good for a lot of things but there are some details we just don't have. Here is a link to DPS that outlines some of the statutes that apply DPS: Connecticut General Statutes - Pertaining to Special Licensing and Firearms be within the law first, the insurance policy second; and if you're still carrying as a bouncer research a few lawyers in the area to find out who is good should you ever need to make a phone call.

    And to go back to the original question, look how it comes across to a group of gun friendly peers in this thread, now mix in 9 anti's and count us as 2 votes and you've got you're jury of 12 peers. You've had LEOs reply to this thread, what does it look like to them? I think the original question of perception has been answered already.

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  3. #47
    VIP Member Array ExSoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canav844 View Post
    That's just the point though, you're acting as a security guard; it is a position of authority. You're job by it's nature is putting you into contact with people in a manner that is inclined to bring an attack on you personally or you as a position. You shoot a drunk that comes after you with a knife in front of or inside the club; and it's not a self defense shooting, it's a security guard shooting in self defense. Major difference in the rules that apply and liability that effects you and you best be licensed to be an armed security guard and not just have a carry permit. Again, legally you're supposed to have training to be in this position in an unarmed capacity, that should have covered this topic, and the armed security license should have gone into great detail on this. You need to get in touch with those that trained you and your employer (maybe the club maybe a security agency) and find out what the specific insurance policy that covers you allows you to carry on duty, it will be spelled out at some level. The internet is good for a lot of things but there are some details we just don't have. Here is a link to DPS that outlines some of the statutes that apply DPS: Connecticut General Statutes - Pertaining to Special Licensing and Firearms be within the law first, the insurance policy second; and if you're still carrying as a bouncer research a few lawyers in the area to find out who is good should you ever need to make a phone call.

    And to go back to the original question, look how it comes across to a group of gun friendly peers in this thread, now mix in 9 anti's and count us as 2 votes and you've got you're jury of 12 peers. You've had LEOs reply to this thread, what does it look like to them? I think the original question of perception has been answered already.
    100% SPOT ON CORRECT! Well said, too.
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  4. #48
    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    your employer wont call you security and has you working in a security position, basically that means you are screwed if anything happens, not just out of a job, but legally. Most security companies have insurance in case you hurt yourself or others in the line of the job. If they won't call you security, your not insured, got bad news for you. That means ANYTHING that happens is on you, you go towards a fight, you break up a fight, you hit someone to get their attention, stun someone with a stun gun, or mace someone in an offensive capacity without security certs and training, you will go to jail for battery. At least for the time being anyway, you might be able to scrape up a win in court. Get out of that job ASAP. And Exsoldier, I don't care what your akido instructor said, in a security/law enforcement position, you hit someone anywhere in the torso, you get charges. Thats how it is, isnt right, but its how it is
    "The value you put on the lost will be determined by the sacrifice you are willing to make to seek them until they are found."

  5. #49
    VIP Member Array ExSoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INccwchris View Post
    And Exsoldier, I don't care what your akido instructor said, in a security/law enforcement position, you hit someone anywhere in the torso, you get charges. Thats how it is, isnt right, but its how it is
    Well, I used to be a bouncer but when I was doing that I wasn't studying Aikido. I'm pretty certain my Aikido training is about personal self defense and not in ANY way related to taking any sort of action in the line of official duties. Right now, I'm a school teacher. I've had to use my Aikido during my 16 years in the inner city but never had to use my cane when I had one of those, while I was super overweight. Since I had the gastric Bypass two years ago and dropped the 150 pounds, I haven't needed a cane. Is that clarification enough? And btw, what goes in law enforcement in Indianapolis isn't necessarily going to be a standard in Florida. You wanna live someplace truly "FREE" move to my state. We're not called the GUNSHINE state for nothing.
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  6. #50
    Distinguished Member Array Knightrider's Avatar
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    That isn't too far away from what I carry in my normal everyday life.

    My normal carry;

    1) S&W 9VE
    2) S&W 437
    3) 2 spare mags for the 9mm
    4) Knife

    Of course that is along with my wallet, keys, phone, notepad, and pen.
    Glock: G22 .40 S&W and G23 .40 S&W Sig Sauer: P938 9mm Smith and Wesson: Model 437 .38 Spl, Model 65 357 Mag, and Sigma SW9VE 9mm

  7. #51
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    LE hitting someone with a baton in the torso will not "always" result in charges. That's a very broad, and incorrect, statement. I dot understand why people just don't get it..... Post true and factual information OR opinions, not opinions you believe to be true and factual.

    If I post something as fact, you better believe I know it to be true, not that it might be, otherwise I clarify. I know for a fact that is not a correct statement.

    Maybe next time try this - "my employer/trainer/certifier told me hitting someone in the torso with our ASP's in m AO may result in charges."
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

  8. #52
    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INccwchris View Post
    your employer wont call you security and has you working in a security position, basically that means you are screwed if anything happens, not just out of a job, but legally. Most security companies have insurance in case you hurt yourself or others in the line of the job. If they won't call you security, your not insured, got bad news for you. That means ANYTHING that happens is on you, you go towards a fight, you break up a fight, you hit someone to get their attention, stun someone with a stun gun, or mace someone in an offensive capacity without security certs and training, you will go to jail for battery. At least for the time being anyway, you might be able to scrape up a win in court. Get out of that job ASAP. And Exsoldier, I don't care what your akido instructor said, in a security/law enforcement position, you hit someone anywhere in the torso, you get charges. Thats how it is, isnt right, but its how it is
    Were do you get this stuff. Jon Consiglio is right. Make sure your facts are facts...
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

  9. #53
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    If you're Ok with carrying all that stuff and it's all legal, then it doesn't matter what others think. Back when I was super ready for nearly anything that may come my way, I too was loaded down with similar hardware. These days, the fizz is gone and I'm lucky to have my gun in tow. As a retired military guy I'm seldom able to carry as the base is on my way into town and I can't take it along. It really sucks but that's just the way it is. Anyway, party-on my friend.


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  10. #54
    Member Array GunTrooper's Avatar
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    Does your employer mandate that you carry weapons or do they just allow you to as a lawful citizen? If they are taking steps to limit their liability (changing your official title to floor host), you can surely bet that they will toss you right up under the bus if you ever have to use any of these items : "We have never required him to be armed... That knife was not issued by the company and we didn't know he was armed... We have never trained our floor hosts to use lethal force..."

    You're set up for failure.
    MadMac likes this.

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