How to get over apprehension of having one in the pipe? - Page 3

How to get over apprehension of having one in the pipe?

This is a discussion on How to get over apprehension of having one in the pipe? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by ICTsnub You say you are familiar with guns, so I hope you have hunted in beautiful Wisconsin. If you have ever hunted ...

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Thread: How to get over apprehension of having one in the pipe?

  1. #31
    VIP Member Array mprp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ICTsnub View Post
    You say you are familiar with guns, so I hope you have hunted in beautiful Wisconsin. If you have ever hunted with a loaded shotgun, you have carried the equivalent of a cocked and locked 1911. It just doesn't look as scary. There you are afield, carrying a chambered and hammer cocked gun on safe. Except you don't have a holster to protect the safety and trigger, and help you keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.

    You really should be worrying about the giant neon sign over your head with an arrow pointing at you the says "GUN" the first few weeks you carry in public.
    That's probably the most "wrong" looking way to carry and it took me a lot of thought, practice and trust in design, carrying a 1911. But, that's what I'm carrying right now at 4:00 and have been for a while, cocked and locked with one in the pipe. And the last time I went to our local outdoor range I pulled it out, thumb safety off and it went BANG exactly when I wanted it to.

    I've never had a second thought with a modern revolver but that hammer back on the 1911 took some getting used to. The good thing is that you realize that there's an obstacle that you would like to get over and that you know that you would prefer to carry in a safe manner yet efficient when deployed and I hope that everyone's posts here will help ease some of that apprehension.

    As others have said, modern firearm designed for carry, good quality holster made specifically for that firearm that covers the trigger and a good head on your shoulders should do you well. Also though, don't forget about recommended maintenance and cleaning of the firearm. I think that's just as important as following all of the other safety rules that we know well.

    And congrats on your state's decision to allow good citizens the ability to protect themselves!
    Vietnam Vets, WELCOME HOME

    Crossman 760 BB/Pellet, Daisy Red Ryder, Crossman Wrist Rocket, 14 Steak Knives, 3 Fillet Knives, Rolling Pin-14", Various Hunting Knives, 2 Baseball Bats, 3 Big Dogs and a big American Flag flying in the yard. I have no firearms; Try the next house.


  2. #32
    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    As a newbie gun carrier I had some apprehension, but now I realize it's not carrying loaded and chambered, it's:
    1. Playing with the HG;
    2. Showing it to friends;
    3. Cleaning it with interruptions, and ammo in the same room;
    4. Improper and careless holstering;
    5. Leaving it out where children and teens can access the HG (not just unloaded - they can find ammo);
    6. Poor muzzle control at the range;
    7. Recklessness;
    8. Lack of familiarity with your HG.

    It's not proper handling, proper deployment, proper storage at night, or properly chambered even in a HG without a manual safety. It's the above.

    If you're so worried carry in your house (only) with a snapcap in the chamber. See how often you 'accidentally' drop the striker/hammer on that snapcap. I'll tell you - never.

    $.02
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  3. #33
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    ^ Distractions are indeed a big part of the problem. I'm firmly convinced that it can cause otherwise very careful folks to have an ND.

    To the degree that I try, as a newbie carrier (as well as being new to "the gun world," entirely) myself, to rid myself of *all* distractions when it comes time to both arm-up as well as when I disarm: as I've said before on another thread, if my 5-year-old comes into my study when I'm arming, I'll tell her that "daddy needs a minute, I need to have privacy to finish dressing."

  4. #34
    Member Array NDliving's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by apvbguy View Post
    a glock like gun in good working order should never fire because it fell and hit the ground
    Right. However, natural instinct might tell you to grab it before it hits the ground. That's why practicing and a good holster can avoid a ND.

  5. #35
    New Member Array nepatternmak's Avatar
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    I started by carrying mine with mag in but chamber empty for a week or so, just around home, then same thing but in public, then chambered a round and carried at home. Next time I went to town, the gun went with me the same way. Been that way ever since. Took a while to just ensure myself that a clumsy moment wouldn't cause a surprise. It didn't and hasn't yet. Plus that time of getting used to it also allowed me to test my clothing against concealibility. You get used to it after a while, altho I do have a moment in walmart every now and then: "oh NO! I forgot to take my gun off! Oh wait, I don't have too"

    dave

  6. #36
    Member Array vista461's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natimage View Post
    Model 18 IWB Holster | Safariland™

    That's my current holster, covers the trigger guard and everything and "clicks" into place but there's no retention system like the hood, snap or ALS. Just for piece of mind I put it on and have ran, jumped, everything trying to see if the gun would dislodge and it doesn't so that's comforting. It's just so ingrained in me (probably from my parents since I've always been a hunter and my parents aren't) that you never load a gun inside...but I'll keep carrying it for longer and longer in my house with one in the pipe and hopefully that'll cure my concern. I even practice with my M&P airsoft gun in the holster to draw safely and acquire the target and everything, I may be a little over cautious but I have a healthy respect for firearms and know what they're capable of so better that then ending up putting a round in my rear.
    A little off topic , but did you buy the holster at Fletcher's? I picked up the same one a few weeks ago for my M&P. Hard to find a non-glock or 1911 holster in stock around here.

  7. #37
    Distinguished Member Array ArkhmAsylm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TedBeau View Post
    Apprehension is a good thing because it keeps us from becoming careless. There are worse things than carrying a gun without one in the chamber. For instance, wouldn't it be worse to be so over confident of the drop safety on your glock that you routinely toss it across the room when you unholster it? I know the drop safety is designed for just such a thing, but anythig made by man can fail. I think being a little more cautious when dealing with something capable of taking a life is great...
    You mean throwing my G17 at the cat across the room isn't a good idea?


    (The vision of a Barney Fife draw was worth a laugh!)
    "Historical examination of the right to bear arms, from English antecedents to the drafting of the Second Amendment, bears proof that the right to bear arms has consistently been, and should still be, construed as an individual right." -- U.S. District Judge Sam Cummings, Re: U.S. vs Emerson (1999)

  8. #38
    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natimage View Post
    I haven't carried yet, November 1st for WI...but I know I need to have one in the pipe to save precious seconds but I've been around guns all my life and am a very avid hunter. It seems really weird for me to load a firearm inside of my house much less carry one into buildings. I know it won't just go off and all that but it just seems so wrong since it goes against 13 years of gun safety that's ingrained into me. Today I put on in the pipe and holstered it around my house just for like 10 minutes then took it out and unloaded it and carried it around empty to get used to how it feels and everything...Any tips about getting over this? It won't bother me out and about outside but having a loaded firearm inside just feel really weird for me.
    I let everyone else chime in first before I chimed in, since my opinions on this topic are not popular. So I'll try to give the most on-topic and uncontroversial opinion as I can.

    Most who know me know that I do not carry a round in the chamber most of the time. However, I have been doing it more and more often over the last few months. I probably carry chambered 20% of the time at this point.

    Believe it or not, I am not really afraid of the gun "going off" while it is holstered on my body. That is because I use very good quality holsters for all of my guns. However, it is those times when the gun is going in or out of the holster, being locked in the safe at night, etc. Those are the times when accidents can happen.

    On the other hand, if my carry guns had manual safety mechanisms, I'd probably carry chambered 100% of the time. But I'm a huge fan of the two carry guns I have and neither have a manual safety lever, so I use an empty chamber as a compromise when I'm at home, then a chambered round when I'm out and about. (I'm at home a lot with a gun on my hip, due to my business)

    This topic has been beaten to death and there is little point in arguing over the practice of carrying chambered or unchambered, so I will leave you with this last piece of advice. According to a poll on this forum somewhere around 95% of the users here carry with a chambered round. That is great for them. And if you want to carry chambered too, go right ahead. Just make sure you are doing it because you want to and not because everyone tells you that you have to.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

  9. #39
    New Member Array ClamsJager's Avatar
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    This thread is alot of help, Im going through this right now. Kinda freaking me out alittle even though i know it wont go off inless my finger sqeezes the trigger. I have yet to leave my house with my gun on me though. I work for a federal government and cant carry or store a gun in my car or on my person while there.

    Im just going to go for it this weekend.
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  10. #40
    Member Array xXMens ReaXx's Avatar
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    How?

    Develop the utmost respect for handling a firearm while realizing that you will not be careless or reckless, and that your gear
    (holster) will cover the trigger. There are NO accidental discharges and the gun will only off if you let it.

    When I carried for the first couple weeks I didn't chamber a round until I was comfortable with carrying in general. That quickly changed. Good luck
    They don't call him lucky Ned Pepper for nothing

  11. #41
    Member Array johnmed3's Avatar
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    Your side arm. Learn it, love it respect it. I'll will take care of you when you need it.
    TN_Mike likes this.

  12. #42
    Senior Member Array MotorCityGun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    Most who know me know that I do not carry a round in the chamber most of the time. However, I have been doing it more and more often over the last few months. I probably carry chambered 20% of the time at this point.

    On the other hand, if my carry guns had manual safety mechanisms, I'd probably carry chambered 100% of the time. But I'm a huge fan of the two carry guns I have and neither have a manual safety lever, so I use an empty chamber as a compromise when I'm at home, then a chambered round when I'm out and about. (I'm at home a lot with a gun on my hip, due to my business)
    Adric22, i'm going to take one more whack at that dead horse. You're a brother in arms and I respect your decision to carry whatever and however, chambered or not.

    You've indicated that 20% of the time you are unholstering/loading/unloading/holstering one of your pistols in order to chamber or unchamber them. This extra handling, IMHO, has a greater potential for an AD/ND than just keeping it holstered with one in the pipe. So, why not just keep it holster with one in the pipe (until it's needed, of couse), and avoid "Those...times when accidents can happen"?

  13. #43
    VIP Member Array Gene83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    I let everyone else chime in first before I chimed in, since my opinions on this topic are not popular. So I'll try to give the most on-topic and uncontroversial opinion as I can.

    Most who know me know that I do not carry a round in the chamber most of the time. However, I have been doing it more and more often over the last few months. I probably carry chambered 20% of the time at this point.

    Believe it or not, I am not really afraid of the gun "going off" while it is holstered on my body. That is because I use very good quality holsters for all of my guns. However, it is those times when the gun is going in or out of the holster, being locked in the safe at night, etc. Those are the times when accidents can happen.

    On the other hand, if my carry guns had manual safety mechanisms, I'd probably carry chambered 100% of the time. But I'm a huge fan of the two carry guns I have and neither have a manual safety lever, so I use an empty chamber as a compromise when I'm at home, then a chambered round when I'm out and about. (I'm at home a lot with a gun on my hip, due to my business)

    This topic has been beaten to death and there is little point in arguing over the practice of carrying chambered or unchambered, so I will leave you with this last piece of advice. According to a poll on this forum somewhere around 95% of the users here carry with a chambered round. That is great for them. And if you want to carry chambered too, go right ahead. Just make sure you are doing it because you want to and not because everyone tells you that you have to.
    Your decision is your decision. I really don't have a problem with that. But, I do have a question. If you carried a revolver instead of a semi-automatic, would you carry the revolver with one chamber empty? If so, which chamber?
    "The superior man, when resting in safety, does not forget that danger may come." ~ Confucius

  14. #44
    Member Array kal0's Avatar
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    To the OP,
    In my case I just practice (trained) and educate myself on my carry guns.
    I verified every single detail about it, how it works, internals, videos, safety features, pay for some extra defensive training classes and practice.

    Some people might think is going overboard, but let me tell you, that automatically took any doubt on my mind on how I should carry and handle my firearms.
    So that's my recommendation.
    Good luck!

    kal0
    TSiWRX likes this.

  15. #45
    Senior Member Array gdm320's Avatar
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    I find myself fortunate to have never hesitated on this point. Since I was a boy my father taught me that "every gun has a packed magazine and one in the chamber"... the same concept as "treat every gun as if it were loaded. I grew up "knowing" this is how guns should be, so I accepted it over many years growing and learning so when it came time to carry it was just the natural progression of things.

    I honestly can't tell anyone how to get over the feeling, I think it just takes time. Give it time to settle in but do what you feel right with.
    "Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death." -- General Omar Bradley

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