How to get over apprehension of having one in the pipe?

This is a discussion on How to get over apprehension of having one in the pipe? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; It's been touched on some. But, I'll go ahead and post any way. The most dangerous thing you can do is over handle your firearm. ...

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Thread: How to get over apprehension of having one in the pipe?

  1. #46
    Distinguished Member Array tcox4freedom's Avatar
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    It's been touched on some. But, I'll go ahead and post any way.

    The most dangerous thing you can do is over handle your firearm.

    Your already doing things that are a lot more dangerous than keeping a loaded gun safely tucked away in a good holster. (Loading, unloading and the like really adds to the danger of an ND.)

    If you are truely concerned about safety, the BEST thing you can do is load up and keep your firearm in a proper holster until it's ready to be used. (Chambered round; or NO chambered round)

    AND

    Don't mess with it unless you're practicing dry fire, shooting or cleaning. (Again, loading, unloading, chambering and re-chambering ALL up the anty when it come to the ND risk.)

    But, if you use your PCW as your HDW and you have to take it out of your PCH and place it in a safe or other holster at night, just keep your trigger finger away from the trigger and you'll be fine.

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  3. #47
    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MotorCityGun View Post
    You've indicated that 20% of the time you are unholstering/loading/unloading/holstering one of your pistols in order to chamber or unchamber them. This extra handling, IMHO, has a greater potential for an AD/ND than just keeping it holstered with one in the pipe. So, why not just keep it holster with one in the pipe (until it's needed, of couse), and avoid "Those...times when accidents can happen"?
    I think this goes back to a debate we had a few months ago about when a person takes their gun off, do they leave it in the holster or not. I put mine in a safe since I have a child. It already takes an extra step to get the gun in the event of a night-time intruder. I don't want to be fumbling around trying to get it out of the holster too. So when I am ready for bed, I remove my gun from the holster and place it in a finger-print activated safe. So being that I don't even leave the house every day, it is very common for the gun to come out of the safe, go on my hip, and back to the safe that evening without ever leaving the house or being chambered. I always check the chamber every time I take the gun off or onto my body to make sure it is either chambered or not depending on my circumstance.

    I think it is a good compromise. At home is where I feel the most likelihood for an ND to occur, and it is also the place where I would have the most advance warning of a problem where that extra 0.3 seconds to chamber doesn't really matter.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gene83
    But, I do have a question. If you carried a revolver instead of a semi-automatic, would you carry the revolver with one chamber empty? If so, which chamber?
    As long as the revolver had a manual safety of some kind, I'd have no problem with that. I've considered looking for a new firearm that has a safety, but I just haven't found any I like as much as the Glock. Also many of the guns I've tried that do have safeties require two hands to disengage it, which takes just as much time as chambering a round. My wife's Sig P239 is nice as the safety lever can be disengaged using your thumb so it can be done as you are drawing or aiming. But I'd prefer something larger than that.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

  4. #48
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    Invest in a good quality GUN belt.
    Invest in a good quality holster. Never a Generic "one size fits many" cheapo holster.

    Put it on and then leave it alone. Don't fiddle with it. Don't constantly check to see if it's still there. Don't un holster it to show it to friends.

    You'll do just fine.

  5. #49
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    If you are walking around with a gun that has no cartridge in the chamber, then you are basically unarmed.

    Things happen very quickly...so quickly that it will make your head spin. A common statement in many reports that cops take where violence took place is " I cant beleive it happened that quick".

    Carrying a gun with a round in the chamber is no guarantee of success, but it sure beats carrying an unloaded gun.
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  6. #50
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    It seems to me like the OP is actually dealing with two separate issues. 1. Carrying a pistol with one in the chamber and 2. Having a fully loaded firearm indoors. It took me a long time to be comfortable carrying my Glock with one in the chamber, though for some reason pocket carrying a revolver didn't bother me so much. Anyway, I finally started carrying with a round in the chamber 100% of the time on a camping trip. The gun literally was never out of my reach for 2+ days and completely loaded the whole time. After that weekend, carrying with one in the chamber did not make me so uncomfortable. So that is my advice. Go camping. I know it's odd, but it worked for me.

  7. #51
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    What I find to be interesting in the "chamber" or "not chamber" debates or even the "how do you get comfortable with one in the chamber" discussions is that people actually see a difference.

    I mean, bear with me for a second.

    I was always taught that all guns are always loaded all the time and you treat every gun as though it were loaded ALL THE TIME.

    So why should it matter if there is one in the chamber or not? Your handling and respect for the firearm should be the same. You should treat it and think of it the same. It's a firearm. It's a weapon. It's loaded... all the time.. Treat it and think of it that way and the chambered or not chambered differences don't seem as paramount. At least not to me, anyway.

    Then again, I never even considered not carrying one in the chamber. It didn't even cross my mind. A loaded gun is one in the chamber. If you are going to use a gun you load it. A+B=C

    It actually kind of surprised me when I found out that people carry without one in the chamber. It simply never occurred to me that anyone would have a problem with a chambered round as long as they didn't have a problem with guns and handling them and treating them with the respect and care they deserve.

    Now, that's not to say that people who are apprehensive about carrying in the chamber do not respect their firearms. I am not saying that. Having listened to the fears and apprehensions of people who carry without a round chambered I can understand things from their point of view and their discomfort. I do think it can be overcome.. however.

  8. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    I think this goes back to a debate we had a few months ago about when a person takes their gun off, do they leave it in the holster or not. I put mine in a safe since I have a child. It already takes an extra step to get the gun in the event of a night-time intruder. I don't want to be fumbling around trying to get it out of the holster too. So when I am ready for bed, I remove my gun from the holster and place it in a finger-print activated safe. So being that I don't even leave the house every day, it is very common for the gun to come out of the safe, go on my hip, and back to the safe that evening without ever leaving the house or being chambered. I always check the chamber every time I take the gun off or onto my body to make sure it is either chambered or not depending on my circumstance.

    I think it is a good compromise. At home is where I feel the most likelihood for an ND to occur, and it is also the place where I would have the most advance warning of a problem where that extra 0.3 seconds to chamber doesn't really matter.



    As long as the revolver had a manual safety of some kind, I'd have no problem with that. I've considered looking for a new firearm that has a safety, but I just haven't found any I like as much as the Glock. Also many of the guns I've tried that do have safeties require two hands to disengage it, which takes just as much time as chambering a round. My wife's Sig P239 is nice as the safety lever can be disengaged using your thumb so it can be done as you are drawing or aiming. But I'd prefer something larger than that.
    I think we've established in previous threads you do not have any credibility on gun handling, training, techniques, or employment. First, you assume alot (see bold above). Secondly, on your wife's P239, it isn't a safety lever....it's a decocker.
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  9. #53
    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIGguy229 View Post
    I think we've established in previous threads you do not have any credibility on gun handling, training, techniques, or employment. First, you assume alot (see bold above). Secondly, on your wife's P239, it isn't a safety lever....it's a decocker.
    Sorry.. she has a SIG P238. I don't know why i said 239, I guess because I was talking to somebody about one the other day and it was on the brain.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

  10. #54
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    I have been carrying for about 2 1/2 years now. At the beginging I felt the same way and thought that I was acting in a safe manner by carrying without one in the chamber. The best way to get used to it is to do it. If you are astill apprehensive get some snap caps, laod it up and carry it around the house for as long as you need to get comfortable. Last night, I even jumped on the trampolene with my nine year-old while carrying my 1911 cocked and locked in a crossbreed supertuck. I am comfortable with equipment. My guns will not "go off" by themselves. If read new stories about negligent discharges (news calls them accidental), almost all are caused by mishandling or failure to follow the 4 basic safety rules.

  11. #55
    Senior Member Array MotorCityGun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    I think this goes back to a debate we had a few months ago about when a person takes their gun off, do they leave it in the holster or not. I put mine in a safe since I have a child. It already takes an extra step to get the gun in the event of a night-time intruder. I don't want to be fumbling around trying to get it out of the holster too. So when I am ready for bed, I remove my gun from the holster and place it in a finger-print activated safe. So being that I don't even leave the house every day, it is very common for the gun to come out of the safe, go on my hip, and back to the safe that evening without ever leaving the house or being chambered. I always check the chamber every time I take the gun off or onto my body to make sure it is either chambered or not depending on my circumstance.

    I think it is a good compromise. At home is where I feel the most likelihood for an ND to occur, and it is also the place where I would have the most advance warning of a problem where that extra 0.3 seconds to chamber doesn't really matter.
    I get the part where you place your pistol in your safe. But what about the other 20% of the time that you are chambering and unchambering your weapon when you go out of the house? Also Ref tcox4freedom's last post #46. It's very similar to what I said.

  12. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by INccwchris View Post
    Actually for the most part you are following the gun safety rules, you are not pointing the gun intentionally at someone or something, you are not loading until ready to use"carrying equals use" you are keeping your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot and you are are not handling firearms while being intoxicated. The rules are very fluid and sometimes must be broken in order to carry safely, carrying and shooting are different things
    For the sake of discussion, what the heck are you talking about? How are the rules fluid? How do you consider carrying safely and breaking the rules to go together in any way?
    adric22 and TN_Mike like this.

  13. #57
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    You just need to get used to it. took a bit for me to get used to keeping my 1911 chambered/loaded and I still dont carry cocked and locked

  14. #58
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    What type of gun will you be carrying? Sorry if I missed it from an earlier post.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

  15. #59
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    I thoroughly believe the guys that carry without one in the chamber have little understanding of how these encounters go down. Things happen in a flash and even when they don't, many don't have the training or mindset to react with immediate and overwhelming force. I can't even count how many times someone has said they hesitated because they just couldn't comprehend or accept what was happening to them. Add in little training to know training and an extra step to ready your weapon and it's a recipe for disaster.

    I wonder how many of Richard Ramirez's (the nightstalker) victims thought they'd have enough time to get to the safe and chamber a round... Unfortunately, they never had the chance as they'd wake up to him in their room.

    For those in fear of a firearm with a round in the chamber, what are you actually afraid of? Also, do you truly understand how a handgun works and what's involved with each type in order for the firing pin to make contact with the primer? I've fallen down a flight of stairs at home while carrying a 1911 (Nighthawk - so no firing pin stop). I fell backwards off of a ladder on a tower and hit the landing about 5 feet down. I landed on my back while both my 1911 and AR were chambered. No discharges then either.

    There is nothing to be afraid of. Only time will prove this to you, and in the mean time you need to do your best to get comfortable with it.

    The only time I don't have one in the chamber personally, is when I run dry.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

  16. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonconsiglio View Post
    For those in fear of a firearm with a round in the chamber, what are you actually afraid of? Also, do you truly understand how a handgun works and what's involved with each type in order for the firing pin to make contact with the primer? I've fallen down a flight of stairs at home while carrying a 1911 (Nighthawk - so no firing pin stop). I fell backwards off of a ladder on a tower and hit the landing about 5 feet down. I landed on my back while both my 1911 and AR were chambered. No discharges then either.
    Since you mention this, I started laughing because I remembered the other day, I was in my buddy's back yard playing with his dogs. They like chasing this one ball, so I picked it up and started running around like a lunatic, haha. They're crazy and I couldn't get away from them at all, so I yell out "BARYY SANDERS!!!" and do a sweet spin move to try and juke them, hahahaha, I lose my balance and nearly fall ONTO to the dogs, landing DIRECTLY onto my Glock 30.... (zomg, it didn't go off!!!!) Of course, this was right before we were going out to dinner with friends. My only concern if I had a grass stain on my shirt, didn't have a care in the world I landed on my gun.

    OP: Even my cheapo Kel-Tec has been dropped, round in chamber. Modern guns, even cheap Kel-Tec's don't randomly go off unless you pull the trigger. It just doesn't happen. Simply having a round in the chamber while holstered, there is zero threat of anything happening, unless you have a crappy holster that doesn't properly cover the trigger.

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