What happens when you are threatened?

This is a discussion on What happens when you are threatened? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; So you mention adrenalin flow with buck fever and hunting. Does hunting and over coming buck fever help with the CC who finds themselves in ...

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Thread: What happens when you are threatened?

  1. #16
    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    So you mention adrenalin flow with buck fever and hunting. Does hunting and over coming buck fever help with the CC who finds themselves in a SHTF? Or is it a different adrenalin rush therefore hunting not helping? As your life is not threatened while shooting a deer.

    I have never looked the "tiger in the eye" yes I had my fight and all growing up but never a life threating ordeal. I have trained and thought about it but still deep in the back of my mind there is this little boubt.

    I have always held my own in FOF classes, but you know airsoft and a training knife are not a real threat to life.
    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. reinman45

    "Is this persons bad behavior worth me having to kill them over?" Guantes

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  3. #17
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    I believe that there are similarities and there are differences. The hunting part helps you to control your actions under chemical influence, even though the level may be lower or somewhat different than in a life threatening situation. In a way it is postponing detrimental reactions until such point as they have no effect on the outcome of the situation.

    Training helps prepare you, be it hunting or threat training, but mindset is what allows you to implement the training in an actual situation.

    ETA: I had a friend that was very sound in dangerous situations, never faltered. Once the danger was past and the situation under control, he would hyperventilate and had to breath in a paper bag to keep from passing out. Eventually, he got over even that.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

  4. #18
    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    Thank You Guantes;

    Hunting is something I have done most of my 60+ years, an animal is only a target to shoot and I mainly look for the spot to hit, nothing else. The rush is no longer there, I shoot a deer to eat and that's about it these days.

    I have what I think to be very good self defense training under my belt and believe my mindset to be where it needs to be to meet what ever should come my way. I continue to train and practice all I can so hopefully if ever needed I will perform to my satisfaction.
    BkCo1 likes this.
    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. reinman45

    "Is this persons bad behavior worth me having to kill them over?" Guantes

  5. #19
    Ex Member Array apvbguy's Avatar
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    training is a must so your actions become machine like, same thing every time, that said if you are ever in a SHTF situation you can't say how you are going to react.
    there will be a tremendous adrenaline dump and you may or may not react the way you've trained.
    every one of us will react differently, training and enhancing your SD skills at every opportunity will give you an edge up and something to lean on when the panic hits, how each individual performs when it happens is hard to predict

  6. #20
    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    Some of it is genetic. My friend is extremely good at 'immediacy'. She acts/reacts almost instantly, whereas I am quite slow to react, slow to anger or take offense and slow to 'ramp up'. In civilian life, I think having patience and good anger management is a plus, but there are times when you need to react. When I'm surprised, I tend to tense up and jump (as in seeing a mouse or a snake unexpectedly), or being surprised to turn the corner and almost run into someone in the dark. I don't know how you deal with that. If you can anticipate problems, I think that's the best way. See it coming and get prepared. Nobody is good at dealing with a pure ambush.

    Good thread

  7. #21
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    Bill,

    You're welcome, glad if I could be of help.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

  8. #22
    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
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    One, it should never be a surprise.... situational awareness and the mind knowing anything can and will happen , at any time. That is easier said than done, I know a lot of people who were well trained, well prepared, but when bullets flew.... I've seen people run, hide, stand there like morons asking "what are they doing" (shooting at you fool), and the gamut. And, then there are people that go instantly into fight mode before their brains even really kick in.

    Your "nature" is part of it. I hear training, training, training, and I've seen people with fantastic "training" turn and run faster than a jack rabbit with his rearend on fire. This does help you with the mechanics and quick response, but not the mind preparation necessarily.

    Be honest with yourself, what are YOU prepared to do ? Shoot without thinking ? Assess IF it's necessary to shoot ? Want to get cover and consider it ? Truthfully, which is it ? Have to think about it a minute first to make sure ? How fast can you assess a situation and the need to shoot or not ? The more situationally aware you are, you are more inclined to see things that sets your mind to be prepared, which helps in assessing what your reaction may need to be if it does.

    My .02 cents.
    paullie likes this.
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  9. #23
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    When training, although I'm taking a different kind of training here... I'm a believer in the the "slow is smooth, smooth is fast" theory.

    When or if you are ever involved in a battle in which you must use your weapon, and you have to deal with a situation agressively as buckeye mentioned, the weapon must appear in your hand, ready, so that it may even surprise you... That of course, is the ideal... hard to attain.

    But, what we're talking about here is something I have probably misnamed (and probably doesn't even truly exist, though I've heard the term before) "muscle memory."

    At some point, if you are ever in a situation where you really need your weapon, and you are experiencing the later stages of the adenaline dump with tunnel vision, loss of fine motor skills, sensory occlusion, you should have already drawn your weapon, and perhaps begun firing it.

    Driving on ice is something many of us do on occasion... skidding happens. Turning into the skid is something we are all taught... the first times you're on ice, you are going slow... you're somewhat nervous about it... you go into a slight skid.... you remember what you have been taught, and you turn just a little into the skid... whadda ya know? this works! You remember that. The next time it happens, maybe you're going a bit faster because you are a bit more confident with the previous experience under your belt. And it happens again... and turning into the skid works again! Now, this can progress to the point of cockiness... and you will learn that it doesn't ALWAYS work at any speed... and hopefully, you hit a nice soft snow bank... to paraphrase, "A man's gotta LEARN his limitations." I've learned mine a few times (so I know many of the nuances, I guess)...

    In a life or death situation, we don't often get "do overs."

    When I was teaching my girls how to drive... The ONE TRUE THING I tried to get across is this... "If you are ever about to have an accident... DRIVE THE CAR UNTIL IT'S OVER." You can't give up, throw your arms up in the air and scream like a girl.... You have to drive until the car quits moving.... It may be the only way to come out of it alive....

    I believe the same thing is true if we are ever involved in a gunfight... or any other life or death situation... Whatever course of action you have chosen in the split seconds before you are engaged in a life saving activity... Stick with it until it's all over.... In some cases, that may mean running away... That's fine... you keep doing that... until it stops working... If it stops working, but you are still in danger, go to plan B... whatever that is... if it means stand (or crouch) and fight... do that until it stops... if it stops, and you are injured... tend to yourself until someone else is doing that for you...

    It's a step-by-step thing... Do every step until it's time for the next one.

    Keep your head...

    "If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs...
    ...
    you'll be a Man my son!"

    Rudyard Kipling's If
    All that said....
    It could be worse.
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  10. #24
    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    I tend to taze or mace people who get violent and threatening, then again thats generally not frowned upon by my supervisors so thats what I am supposed to do
    "The value you put on the lost will be determined by the sacrifice you are willing to make to seek them until they are found."

  11. #25
    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    Here is a couple video on what the Seals are finding about fear and how to deal with it.

    The Brain - Fear & Navy Seals (1/2) - YouTube

    The Brain - Fear & Navy Seals (2/2) - YouTube
    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. reinman45

    "Is this persons bad behavior worth me having to kill them over?" Guantes

  12. #26
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    Everyone has a natural tendency in how they react to such circumstances. If your natural tendency is to freeze or panic, then you need professional training to re-wire your natural response. Even if your natural tendency is to be calm, cool, and collected while reasoning your way through a situation, training can only help and improve your abilities.

    I've had a couple hydroplane accidents at high speeds, and my natural reaction was to stay calm and steer the car out of the 360s and into a safe spot without getting hurt or hitting anything. The gravity of the situation doesn't tend to hit me until after it is over. I have always been this way with stressful situations...once you should be able to breathe easier is when the stress hits me. Realizing this about myself, if I am ever in a SD situation I will limit my comments after the event until I have had medical evaluation and a chance to speak to a lawyer.
    Know Guns, Know Safety, Know Peace.
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  13. #27
    Distinguished Member Array kelcarry's Avatar
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    Dennis you are right on. Guantes says it all very succinctly. I do not know how or where all of you who have had these experiences live and work and play and maybe I have been blessed for 69 years but all of your stories are very far removed from anything I have ever experienced. I tend to think that I am always aware of where I am going, when I am going, what I am doing and tend to avoid any potential situation by not going there or doing it. The old story of Plaxico Burris who mentioned he needed his firearm because of where he was going--answer back was--maybe you should not have been going there in the first place--duh. Number one on my list is never get in the situation---yah it is easier said than done but I am sure many situations could have been avoided with a little more situational awareness even before you committed to going somewhere or doing something. If the "what if " is truly unavoidable and really not anything you could have avoided even with good thinking, Guantes says it all. Unfortunately I would think that the majority of forum members, including myself, have not "immersed" ourselves in a police-style, military-style training program(s) that will go a long way towards making any response relevant and effective. My answer is to up the ante on situational awareness and know how to use and fire my weapon. At least in my life style, I would venture to say that the situational awareness takes care of 99.9% of my lifestyle and maybe a little more than that. The rest of the threat will involve retreat, running away, yelling, screaming for witnesses and getting my head in order for something that I have never faced before--but I'll be damned if I am not going to defend myself. In my home, however, Castle Doctrine will go a long way to allowing me to defend myself to its limits within a setting that is to my advantage. Lights, security, locked bedroom door, cell phone to LEO, car alarm remote, and preplanned location with shotgun are my edge. I will not leave that bedroom to confront (no one else in any other part of house-ie children)--all is insured and replaceable--I am not.

  14. #28
    Senior Member Array BkCo1's Avatar
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    BillMo, I am like you and have hunted for years. I was taught to pick a spot for a target in the Marines. I taught that to my recruits. To this day when I aim I pick a point to hit be it man or beast and I am quit calm about it.
    Semper Fi

  15. #29
    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis1209 View Post
    Personally, I think situational awareness is your best defense. I'm still lacking on that some but I'm trying to practice it every time I go out the door. I'm normally the type walking around with my head in the clouds, but the world has drastically changed. Performed deliberately and correctly, I can see it giving you precious extra seconds to react. Now, walking out your door and your neighbor letting out her Pit Bulls at the same time, that concept may not be an advantage to you. But the majority of the time in public, staying in condition "yellow" is advantageous.
    I agree with this 100%. The problem is most of us don't have the time and/or money,health, or patience to continue to go to training classes. In order to deal with the type of threat described by the OP, you need training more like martial-arts or tactical gun fighting. Because shooting at a still paper target will not produce adrenaline like needs to be done for this type of training.

    But as regular folks who are not in law-enforcement what we CAN do is constantly be aware of our surroundings. It takes lots of practice and determination for that too, but it doesn't cost any money or any time specifically to train for it. If every where you go you are watching each and every person or place where a person might be hiding and making a decision seconds ahead of time "what would I do if person x does y." That way, if they do actually do something, you already know what your response will be before it happens. When you are walking around a corner (and hopefully taking a wide approach to that corner) you need to be thinking," what will I do if a person jumps out at me when I make the turn." Even if I'm comfortably sitting in a restaurant eating, I am looking at all of the entrances and emergency exits. I look at all of the people coming in and out, and I make a quick plan in my mind of where I would take cover and/or which exit I would use if needed. I also try to watch the parking lot through the glass as much as I can. If a group of guys in ski-masks come into the place, I'd rather spot them out in the parking lot rather than notice them after they've come in the door and start making trouble.

    Obviously, we can't be at this level of alertness 100% of the time. It would be exhausting. But the more we can remain at that level, our chances of being on the losing side of a conflict is much less.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

  16. #30
    Member Array nazshooter's Avatar
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    Adric:
    I play a similar game when I'm out and about. I don't know how much it sharpens my actual reflexes but it sure does point out situations where I may have made myself vulnerable without realizing it.

    Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk

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