Rechambering every day

This is a discussion on Rechambering every day within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; OK.. Here's a brain-teaser for you. I've actually sort of gotten in the habit somehow of keeping a live round chambered in my SD pistols. ...

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Thread: Rechambering every day

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    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Rechambering every day

    OK.. Here's a brain-teaser for you. I've actually sort of gotten in the habit somehow of keeping a live round chambered in my SD pistols. Please don't turn this into a chambered/unchambered debate because that is not where I'm going with this, I just needed to point that out before explaining the next bit.

    We are about 99% done with our foster training and we will be licensed in a few days. And even though TX passed this great law a few months ago that says foster parents with CHL can carry in the presence of foster children, there are certain rules that aren't addressed. One of those is gun storage. The new law doesn't apply if I'm not carrying the gun on my body. And child protective services' idiodic rule is that any gun in storage must work like this. The gun must be in one safe, unloaded completely. The magazines and ammo must be in a totally different safe that uses a different key. Brilliant huh? So that means in a few days I will no longer be able to keep my loaded firearm in a safe at night.

    So you see where I'm going with this. If I carry with a chambered round, then that means every day I will have to take out that round from the chamber, as well as the entire magazine and place that in a different safe. In the morning I'd have to rechamber the round again.

    Is there any harm in doing this? For example, will it eventually damage the ammo? How many times would you chamber a single round before replacing it?

    On a separate note, I'm trying to figure out a way I could sleep with my loaded gun, and avoid the entire "storage" problem, but can't see how that would work.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

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    RKM
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    You will eventually damage the ammo (setback). There is not a specific amount of times it can be done. Some ammo is more susceptible to setback then others.

    I keep my pistols chambered the majority of the time. If I unload them for whatever the reason may be, I take the round that was chambered, mark the case with a sharpie, and then put it as the last round on the bottom of the mag when I go to reload. Once I go through this and chamber each round 2-3 times, I shoot the ammo and buy more.

    Everybody has their own method, that's mine.

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    Continual chambering and un-chambering of a round can eventually cause bullet setback, which will cause and increase in pressure when fired. Excessive setback can cause catastrophic failure of your weapon, with disastrous results.

    You can do 2 things to resolve this, rotate the rounds, so the same one isn't constantly being chambered, or make yourself an inexpensive go/no-go gauge out of a piece of stiff plastic.
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    Yes there is a problem rechambering the same round over and over. It's called bullet set-back. The process of chambering can over time cause the bullet to be pushed further into the case. If it get's set-back too much it can cause over pressure and a blown up gun and possibility of injury.

    I have a big gun safe with a rotary dial and a key lockout to boot. If that's not enough for the state, I wouldn't do it, but that's me....
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    VIP Member Array Adam42's Avatar
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    As they say in different areas, put it in and leave it.

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    How are you accomplishing this? Are you placing the round in the pipe by hand and then letting the slide close, or are you stripping one off the top of the mag? I don't know if it makes a difference. I'm just asking.

    P.s. Edit: Very noble on the foster training. I was a guardian ad litem for a while and I know what a commitment this is.

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    Distinguished Member Array grouse's Avatar
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    Guess I worry to much. I don't like to rechamber the same round more than a few times so when I do rechamber I always rotate from the magaznie(s).

    Have you given any thought to a revolver & speed loaders? Nothing wrong with a good wheel gun.

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    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    That is going to almost exclusively depend on your method of chambering and the force used to accomplish the chambering.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

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    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Like the others have said, set-back is the worry.

    Many different things impact (er, no pun intended, sorry) how quickly you'll encounter that problem, but most in "the gun community" will say that a couple to a few "re-chamberings" are safe, and typically, people will use a Sharpie or the like to mark their chambered round before they recycle it into the magazine, so that they'll know when it next comes up. There's a number of good recent threads here on DC.com about bullet set-back/setback, and I'd encourage you to search them up to read.

    I like to shoot my chosen SD/HD ammo, so that I keep in practice with its somewhat different "feel" and ballistics (only at longer ranges do I see this issue, with my chosen firearms), versus my usual range-fodder. So, I go one step further: every time I strip out the chambered round, I simply put it away in a box I've marked "Once Chambered," and that box goes with me to the range.

    Can it get expensive this way? Sure. But how about that cup of coffee you're used to buying from the local Starbucks first thing in the morning?

    Since you're now switched to "Condition 1," with the storage issue, you run into possible brain-lock confusion, in a SHTF scenario, when you've rushed over to your safe.

    A few friends of mine taught me this trick:

    - Everything that's in a holster is "Condition 1," ready-to-rock. If you have the time to "Admin" the situation, do a press-check and magazine check before you holster the gun again; and always, always, verify that you're holstering a gun that's in "Condition 1."

    - Everything that's not in a holster is "Condition X" - in your case, completely stripped out.

    With regard to your quick-access needs, that's going to be a tough one.

    In having kids in the house, the question becomes how can you get around that storage requirement, while still making sure that the gun is safe yet quickly accessible..... I'm going to sleep on that one a bit, to see if I can't come up with something better: the only idea I really have now would be that you'll need to insure that your kids cannot physically access your room in the middle of the night, when you're in-bed. I don't know if that would be acceptable for you (my daughter can come into our room, if she needs something).

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    Ex Member Array RugerRon's Avatar
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    Do the child services people do unannounced home inspections?

    I'd get another safe and if asked, I would tell them that you store everything separate as required. But... In reality I would store the items in whatever reasonable configuration that offers you quick access for home defense and insures that the child, or children are unable to access the weapons.

    There are as many stupid rules and laws as there are stupid people. I think your job is to look after the welfare of the foster kids, not comply with some redundant regulation conceived by a firearm illiterate bureaucrat.
    9MMare, dV8r, gasmitty and 2 others like this.

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    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guantes View Post
    That is going to almost exclusively depend on your method of chambering and the force used to accomplish the chambering.
    Well, in the past I might have just put the round in the chamber and released the slide. However, after I posted about that here a few months ago many people said that could damage my extractor. So to be on the safe side, I've been chambering one from the magazine, ejecting, adding another round, and re-inserting the magazine.

    OK.. I wasn't familiar with this set-back issue. So now that I know, I have a plan. I think I'll just keep a spare box of ammo and then every time I chamber, I'll take one from the new box, and put the old one in a different box. Since I go to the range once or twice a month anyway, it won't really cost any extra money. It will just take extra time on my part to do it.

    Another thought I have is using a spare magazine and keeping it full of "new" ammo and just chambering the round from the spare magazine, then take it out and insert the regular magazine that is already full. That will keep me from having to constantly press a new round into the magazine every single day.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

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    Distinguished Member Array RevolvingMag's Avatar
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    In SC, a weapon is 'in use' if it's your SD/HD weapon. My handguns and my 12ga are always 'in use'. When a weapon is in 'storage', it is unloaded, with no magazine inserted.

    If you haven't already, check to see what exactly is considered 'in use'/'in storage' in TX. And, get yourself one of those 'small' biometric safes that you can mount/secure in your room near the bed.
    "Rock and load, lock and roll... what's it matter? FIRE!!"

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    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    Damage to the extractor due to direct chamber loading will primarily depend on if the weapon was designed for direct chamber loading. If direct chamber loading is or is not recommended is usually contained the the owners manual.

    Even if chambering from the mag, some weapons will allow manual control of the forward movement of the slide to a low inertia level and still properly chamber, others will not. This is what will make the difference relative to setback.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

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    VIP Member Array 9MMare's Avatar
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    This is a very interesting thread on an issue I wasnt aware of. I dont have a situation similar, but this is very good info.

    Thank you Adric....and posters.
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    Freedom doesn't mean safe, it means free.

    The thing about "defense" is that it has practically nothing to do with guns. (As passed on by CCW9MM)

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    Speer ammo is quite resistant to bullet setback. FYI

    Much also depends on the individual firearm.
    They seem to be quite idiosyncratic as to if they will set a bullet back during the feed or not.

    You can feed your cartridge as slowly as your personal pistol will allow which will go a long way toward eliminating set back.

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