ER reaction to CC? - Page 2

ER reaction to CC?

This is a discussion on ER reaction to CC? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by NC Bullseye Two things will usually happen, first if LE is on scene when you are found to be carrying, the medics ...

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  1. #16
    Member Array Jermedic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC Bullseye View Post
    Two things will usually happen, first if LE is on scene when you are found to be carrying, the medics will have the LE secure the weapon and hold it for you. The other possibility is that if no LE or it's not noticed until you are in route back to the hospital is the medics will secure it and turn it over to the hospital security or LE at the hospital to hold for you.

    This is a very common occurrence and all the medics and hospitals I've heard of have a routine in place to make this work.

    Let this be the LEAST of your worries. They'll make sure you are taken care of.
    This is what we did when I worked in CA and is also what we do out here in AZ. Not really much of a big deal.


  2. #17
    Member Array Bigkahuna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by archer51 View Post
    In CA, MD and NY procedures require emergency room staff to scream like little girls and run from the room while screaming "OMG OMG MWAG....MWAG!!


    Seriously though, as with most things, procedures will vary from hospital to hospital as well as EMS services. Most will have either police or hospital security, secure the weapon until you or a responsible individual can take possession of it.
    Some New York Emergency Rms will see more guns in a week than other hospitals see in a year. Ours has a locked box to secure all firearms in until patient is cleared by the local PD.

  3. #18
    Distinguished Member Array kelcarry's Avatar
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    I agree with retsupt. Is this really something you really need to know by asking? Common sense should tell you exactly what most of the replies have to say.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by rays197 View Post
    LOL! don't forget IL.
    In Illinois they let you die & call a politician to keep the weapon.
    "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain."
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  5. #20
    Senior Member Array Zsnake's Avatar
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    I was out in Sturgis, S.D. and got really sick. Had to call an ambulance. In the van, a medic asked me if I had any weapons on me. (DUH) I said yes a .45 and told him where it was. He then asked if I had a knife. Yep, he took that also. I then asked him what about spare ammo (A mythical thing like a unicorn). He took that, too. A week later when I was leaving the hospital, I just had to check with security and all was returned. The officer merely asked me to wait until I had left the building to reload.
    All in all, a really nice encounter.
    I did cuss them as my concealed permit had disappeared and I had to apply for a new one. Then 7 months later I found the original in the lining of my jacket. I had evidently pulled it out to show them (I reall don't remember, but they told me it was standard procedure) and they had put it in my jacket pocket. It had fallen through a hole in my lining.
    All's well that ends well.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by retsupt99 View Post
    If I'm having a heart attack, I couldn't care less about my firearm...EMS and ER's have procedures for dealing with one's firearm, you don't need to worry about that.
    ^^^^ Really.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  7. #22
    Senior Member Array DoctorBob's Avatar
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    I've been an E.D. doc (we don't like to call them E.R.s any more, they are departments) for 35 years. Like all you other stuff, it gets inventoried, stored and returned to you. If you were involved in a shooting, and wounded, it is reported to the police. Usually a 'security' person is detailed to make the gun safe and lock it up. Most EMS people are trained to secure a weapon. Your biggest problem is that it might get lost in the shuffle. I'd recommend mentioning it right away so it gets tagged and stored safely.
    'Guerir quelquefois, soulager souvent, consoler toujours.'

    "Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." (John Steinbeck)

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  8. #23
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    I've worked fire/rescue for over 30 years, as well as part time with EMS. We recently responded to a local Wal Mart for a person having a diabetic emergency and discovered he was carrying a (very nice) .45 and a folding knife. With no LE on scene, I removed his firearm and knife (he was unconcious at the time), cleared the firearm and stowed both in the unit. An LE unit arrived while we were still doing our assessment and retrieved the weapons from us prior to our departure to the hospital. They ran a check to insure the .45 wasn't stolen, then followed us to the ED and returned them to him (we knew he had a CWP because we found it while looking for his ID) with no problem.
    The United States Constitution (c) 1791. All Rights Reserved

  9. #24
    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
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    My sister is an ER Nurse, she also has a CHP, when I went in for Kidney Stones, she put my weapon in her purse and gave it back to me when I left. Fortunately the pain subsided before having to get the happy juice, so I walked out with everything I walked in with. Could have done without the stones though, got rid of them later.

    I asked her about others, she said they would have the on duty LEO secure it and it would be returned when they were discharged.

    As others have said, it's low on the concern list if you are ER bound.
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
    If I have to explain it, you wouldn't understand

  10. #25
    Senior Member Array Hot Wing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4my son View Post
    My sister is an ER Nurse, she also has a CHP, when I went in for Kidney Stones, she put my weapon in her purse and gave it back to me when I left. Fortunately the pain subsided before having to get the happy juice, so I walked out with everything I walked in with. Could have done without the stones though, got rid of them later.

    I asked her about others, she said they would have the on duty LEO secure it and it would be returned when they were discharged.

    As others have said, it's low on the concern list if you are ER bound.
    Man you have to have happy juice with stones

    Only had them one time hopefuly never ever again

  11. #26
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retsupt99 View Post
    If I'm having a heart attack, I couldn't care less about my firearm...EMS and ER's have procedures for dealing with one's firearm, you don't need to worry about that.
    Could not disagree more. If they mishandled my weapon, I'd have a heart attack and die!

  12. #27
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    When I had my heart attack a couple of years ago, my wife had driven me to the ER, but had driven myself home from the office first, and was carrying. My gun and holster were removed and secured by an EMT who is also a Reserve Police Officer. Even though I ended up being flown to a nearby heart center, my handgun and holster were in bag personal belongings sent home with my wife when she left the ER. Five months later, when was involved in a motorcycle crash, I had my holster on my hip, but my handgun was locked securely in a hard case on my bike's luggage rack. I was able to tell the First Responders where the firearm was, so they didn't have to worry about it having flown out of my holster during the crash. Once again, I was flown to a nearby trauma center, but this time my bike was hauled to a local wrecker company holding lot. I was flown to a 2nd, regional trauma center, and when I arrived there an ER nurse had me call my wife to tell her I had made the trip okay. At that time, I told her my weapon was still on my bike, and asked her to go with a Sheriff's Deputy friend of ours to retrieve it ASAP, which they did. I'm happy to report both the gun (a Glock 21) and its owner are still ticking.
    In short, it's also important to consider what may happen if you're NOT carrying the weapon when you take ill or are injured.
    BigRay

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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by archer51 View Post
    In CA, MD and NY procedures require emergency room staff to scream like little girls and run from the room while screaming "OMG OMG MWAG....MWAG!!


    Seriously though, as with most things, procedures will vary from hospital to hospital as well as EMS services. Most will have either police or hospital security, secure the weapon until you or a responsible individual can take possession of it.
    I thought you were being serious
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  14. #29
    Member Array Aaron1100us's Avatar
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    I work security at a hospital. We unload the gun, put a zip tie through it and store it in our gun safe until the patient is discharged.

    Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

  15. #30
    Member Array sharpetop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC Bullseye View Post
    Two things will usually happen, first if LE is on scene when you are found to be carrying, the medics will have the LE secure the weapon and hold it for you. The other possibility is that if no LE or it's not noticed until you are in route back to the hospital is the medics will secure it and turn it over to the hospital security or LE at the hospital to hold for you.

    This is a very common occurrence and all the medics and hospitals I've heard of have a routine in place to make this work.

    Let this be the LEAST of your worries. They'll make sure you are taken care of.
    ^^^This! In my neck of the woods there is typically a LEO on scene for medical emergencies, if for no other reason, to help lift the patient.

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