Dry fire drills

This is a discussion on Dry fire drills within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Practice does not make perfect. Perfect practice does....

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Thread: Dry fire drills

  1. #16
    Member Array Roguestew's Avatar
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    Practice does not make perfect. Perfect practice does.

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  3. #17
    Distinguished Member Array Jason Storm's Avatar
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    As a result of my local outdoor range making the rules more stricter and not allowing anymore shooting from other positions except prone and sitting, I will be doing those range prohibited shooting positions with dry-fire drills using inert rounds at the privacy of my own home.

  4. #18
    Member Array txdrhuntr's Avatar
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    I say +1 on the use of the laser "Bullet" to dry fire. Got the Laserlyte target and .45 ACP laser insert for my b-day. Can't believe how much my trigger control has improved since I have had that system.

    I also can draw and fire with the laser, something not allowed at the ranges close to my house. Drawing and firing from IWB Holster can be very tricky unless done correctly. Someone already mentioned muscle memory. Drawing from concealment and getting that first round on target takes time and a lot of work. I sometimes use a timer to check myself and put the pressure on to help load up the stress level.

    I put the target in various places around the house and at various levels (even more fun, have your spouse place the target!) Then try the walk about and draw from concealment. Wow, sometimes I see how bad it could get when I notice that there is no return fire and I miss.

    One other drill is mentioned with a dime or penney. I use a spent case. Have to have some help from the spouse to put the case on the front site but if you pulll the trigger five times without the case falling off, you're doing well.

    Firing from unusual positions is interesting with the laser. Firing while on your back and getting hits on a 6" target is difficult without some practice.

    Just some ways I try to make life interesting while practicing.

  5. #19
    Member Array Truckinfavis's Avatar
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    For dry firing practice, try putting a penny on the front sight when pulling the trigger. Keep it balanced and inline with the target. Once that is accomplished a few times then try a dime.

  6. #20
    Member Array OldLincoln's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Dark View Post
    I will say that having added a laser bullet to my dry fire practice has made it even more productive.
    ^^^ This!! After "imagining" my dry fire attempts were all dead center, I bought the LaserLite cartridge. It emits a 200ms light dead center from the bore. I discovered I needed work and with proper feedback my shooting has improved. I've saved the cost of the LaserLite already in ammo. One thing, I'm very cautious about clearing the gun and leaving ammo in the bedroom and the laser in the office. I'll practice off and on while in the office at "targets" around the room and often check to make sure no mag and only the laser chambered.

  7. #21
    Ex Member Array MadMac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldLincoln View Post
    ^^ I'll practice off and on while in the office at "targets" around the room and often check to make sure no mag and only the laser chambered.
    I get a little cold chill down my spine when I read these types of responses. I have read about innumerable NDs where the gun owner says he was dry firing a couple hours ago, got a phone call, or stopped to watch BayWatch for a few minutes, forgot he had reloaded, then picked it up to practice again. Bang!

    My suggestion: If you're going to practice with dry fire, pick a time and place (NOT in your living room - you have it loaded in there most of the time, don't you?) and focus on your practice. Perhaps your garage or basement. Focus on nothing else, nor have any background distractions. When you are done, you are done. Walk away, reload or store the firearm as you wish. But don't do this in any place where you usually have the gun loaded, and don't tolerate distractions. If you need to take a call or answer the door, leave the action open, and go to another area of the house.

  8. #22
    Senior Member Array HK Dan's Avatar
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    You can practice just about everything in dry fire that does not require recoil. I use a shot timer and set the par timer to what I think I can do the skill in and get a hit on my target (confirmed by the sights). Okay, so my draw is about .8 seconds. I set .8, hit the delay button and draw on the beep. If I can draw and dryfire with the sights in the A zone of a 1/3 scale target 5 times, I drop it 1/10th.

    Reloads--start with the pistol cocked and aimed at the target. On the beep, reload it, and when reloaded dryfire into the A zone of the target. If you can do it 5 times before the par time beep, drop it 1/10th and go again.

    Multi-target engagement--start with the gun cocked and aimed at one target. On the beep switch to a second target and dryfire. If you beat the par time 5 times running, drop it 1/10th.

    You can practice aiming around cover, from unusual positions, while moving (great for get off the X drills).

    Pick up Steve Anderson's "Refinement and repetition" for more. Saul Kirsch' "Perfect Practice" also has great drills in it.
    "What does Marcellus Wallace LOOK like?"

  9. #23
    Member Array OldLincoln's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadMac View Post
    I get a little cold chill down my spine when I read these types of responses. I have read about innumerable NDs where the gun owner says he was dry firing a couple hours ago, got a phone call, or stopped to watch BayWatch for a few minutes, forgot he had reloaded, then picked it up to practice again. Bang!

    My suggestion: If you're going to practice with dry fire, pick a time and place (NOT in your living room - you have it loaded in there most of the time, don't you?) and focus on your practice. Perhaps your garage or basement. Focus on nothing else, nor have any background distractions. When you are done, you are done. Walk away, reload or store the firearm as you wish. But don't do this in any place where you usually have the gun loaded, and don't tolerate distractions. If you need to take a call or answer the door, leave the action open, and go to another area of the house.
    Perhaps you missed the part above that line where I state...
    Quote Originally Posted by OldLincoln View Post
    One thing, I'm very cautious about clearing the gun and leaving ammo in the bedroom and the laser in the office. I'll practice off and on while in the office at "targets" around the room and often check to make sure no mag and only the laser chambered.
    To clarify, the ammo stays in the bedroom and the laser in the office. And, "I often check to make sure no mag and only the laser is chambered." The check is like the empty gun check whenever picking it up. Believe me I do not want to put a bullet in my walls, even though my targets are in a safe direction. The problem I have with a schedule of practice times is that I seldom do it. I won't stop when in the middle of things and take the time to do the structured practice. If the gun is in the office it is unloaded and when I pick it up I look.

    I typically decide to practice, get my gun from the bedroom, unload it checking it twice, and carry it into the office and slip in the laser. I'll practice immediately, set the gun on the desk and do some work, then pick it up, check it, and practice more. I don't believe in lengthy practice but strive for perfect practice. I prefer to "shoot" 20 or so times depending on how I'm doing then repeat later. Same at the range. If I'm shooting well I shoot 20 -30rds and go home. However, it is always a lesson thing as only perfect practice makes perfect.

    I do understand and share your concern of a ND, however, and agree it may not be for everyone.

  10. #24
    Senior Member Array HK Dan's Avatar
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    Dry fire can be FAR more than we've talked about so far. You can do anything in dryfire that you can do in live fire except feel the recoil. I use a shot timer with the par time set for what I think I can do the skill in.If I beat it 5 times (dry fire with the sights in the A Zone) I drop it 1/10th. What do I practice?

    Draws, reloads, target transitions, target acqisition from around cover, unusual positions like seated or prone, unusual starts like the gun on the ground or in a box, etc.

    Pick up Refinement and Repetition; it is a primer on dryfire practice by Steve Anderson. While competition oriented, it's very good and should give you SD info as well.
    "What does Marcellus Wallace LOOK like?"

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