Dry fire drills

Dry fire drills

This is a discussion on Dry fire drills within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I've never really done dry fire drills other than practicing when it goes click to run through the malfunction/empty protocol. What do you do in ...

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  1. #1
    Member Array natimage's Avatar
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    Dry fire drills

    I've never really done dry fire drills other than practicing when it goes click to run through the malfunction/empty protocol. What do you do in terms of dry fire that has helped you and what should I put into my training?
    Psalm 23
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    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
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    IMHO, Dryfire is instrumental in accuracy in shooting, it allows you to practice proper technique and trigger control without the distraction of live rounds and or worrying about hits on target. just focus on technique, sight alignment and trigger control, then these functions will become second nature when you need to use them. It has helped me immensely with my on target accuracy.
    Truckinfavis likes this.
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    VIP Member Array SpencerB's Avatar
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    Practice acquiring and reacquiring a target, trigger control, consistency in trigger squeeze and sight picture.

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    Distinguished Member Array DontTreadOnI's Avatar
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    Muscle memory, muscle memory, muscle memory...
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    Member Array natimage's Avatar
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    After every dry fire do you tap and wrack to build the muscle memory of *click*=clear malfunction...?
    Psalm 23
    In God I trust, it's the rest of you I'm concerned about

    Certified Smith & Wesson M&P pistol and MP15 rifle armorer

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    VIP Member Array SpencerB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natimage View Post
    After every dry fire do you tap and wrack to build the muscle memory of *click*=clear malfunction...?
    If that's what I am working on I will, but sometimes I just simulate the click as the gun went off then I rack and reacquire my target.

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    Member Array ramblinman's Avatar
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    I feel that one of the best uses of laser grips is the ability to dry fire practice while getting feedback from the laser in target. The laser on the wall, for instance, shows your ability to lock on the target with a steady aim while going through the motions. Some say lasers are useless in a true self defense situation, as things move quickly and it may be impossible to acquire the sight of the laser on the BG, and that may be true. But no one can argue their advantages when it comes to dry fire practice!
    9MMare likes this.

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    VIP Member Array 9MMare's Avatar
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    I dont think I have any drills that are different from others, but I do have some absolute safety rules.

    All my live ammo stays in one room of the house, period. Unless secured for going out (in my gun) there is never any live ammo anywhere else in the house. Gun is loaded and unloaded in one room only.

    So when I come to the living room, where I do most of my dry firing, I come in, clear my weapon (it has already been unloaded in other room, but I do the same safety check again), and then I can load snap caps, do drills for drawing, etc etc etc.
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    VIP Member Array Majorlk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9MMare View Post
    I dont think I have any drills that are different from others, but I do have some absolute safety rules.

    All my live ammo stays in one room of the house, period. Unless secured for going out (in my gun) there is never any live ammo anywhere else in the house. Gun is loaded and unloaded in one room only.

    So when I come to the living room, where I do most of my dry firing, I come in, clear my weapon (it has already been unloaded in other room, but I do the same safety check again), and then I can load snap caps, do drills for drawing, etc etc etc.
    Good plan. That's the way do my drills, too.
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    Senior Member Array Gaius's Avatar
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    Let me suggest the simplest of dry fire drills. Presuming all safety measures have been taken, take correct aim at a relatively small target. With your sight concentrated on the front sight, squeeze the trigger. When the hammer or striker engages, see if your sight has moved even slightly from your target. If so, this is a trigger control issue that can be remedied through a few hundred or so so dry firings. The dividends will show up greatly in live fire at the range.
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    Member Array The Dark's Avatar
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    I will say that having added a laser bullet to my dry fire practice has made it even more productive.
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    Member Array steelhawk's Avatar
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    I have read that some people put a dime on the front sight when dry firing. I'm going to try that the next time I do it.

    I have a half dozen snap caps that I bought and a few dummy rounds painted blue that I made a couple of years ago.

  14. #14
    Member Array natimage's Avatar
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    ^^ I was literally just up doing that...I was using pennies actually and doing it with both hands, strong hand only and weak hand only and seeing how many pennies I could stack on the front sight without them falling off
    Psalm 23
    In God I trust, it's the rest of you I'm concerned about

    Certified Smith & Wesson M&P pistol and MP15 rifle armorer

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    cj
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    Senior Member Array cj's Avatar
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    The big thing I've found in dry fire practice is to make sure you're doing the fundamentals correctly. It doesn't do much good to practice something incorrectly and have it ingrained with a thousand repetitions.

    For my personal practice, it ranges from complete present from a holster through firing a shot, to simply practicing grip and trigger control (my two weakest areas at the moment).

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