Supplies to Treat Gunshot Wounds On Hand? - Page 3

Supplies to Treat Gunshot Wounds On Hand?

This is a discussion on Supplies to Treat Gunshot Wounds On Hand? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; According to California law, if I have to shoot someone in self defense, after the threat has ended I am required to "render aid". So ...

View Poll Results: Supplies and Skills

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  • I do not have any gunshot wound/trauma (GSW) supplies or the skills to use them.

    30 34.88%
  • I have at least basic GSW supplies (tourniquet, clotting agent) but no knowledge of their use.

    1 1.16%
  • I have at least basic GSW supplies (tourniquet, clotting agent) and basic knowledge on their use but no advanced training.

    29 33.72%
  • I have at least basic GSW supplies (tourniquet, clotting agent) and professional training in their use.

    11 12.79%
  • I have above and beyond the basic trauma supplies (please elaborate) and no professional training in their use.

    0 0%
  • I have above and beyond the basic trauma supplies (please elaborate) and professional training in their use.

    3 3.49%
  • I have all of the supplies, the training to use them and have used them in a occupational or volunteer basis.

    12 13.95%
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Thread: Supplies to Treat Gunshot Wounds On Hand?

  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array Arborigine's Avatar
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    According to California law, if I have to shoot someone in self defense, after the threat has ended I am required to "render aid". So they can sue me? I can try to stop the bleeding with my boot, right?
    Seriously, i carry basic first aid kits and gloves on my bike and in my cars, but have no training. I have kept a couple of fellow riders from bleeding out before medics arrived. never considered a combat kit, but wouldn't hurt to have it.


  2. #32
    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
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    For EDC: Get some Quikclot and an Israeli Battle Dressing, stick it in your pocket, and call it a day.
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

    “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress and grows brave by reflection.” ― Thomas Paine

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arborigine View Post
    According to California law, if I have to shoot someone in self defense, after the threat has ended I am required to "render aid".
    The subjective part is "after the threat has ended." If they are still conscious, I'm not going anywhere near them. It is very dangerous to approach, touch or let your guard down with a person who just moments ago was trying to kill you! You have no idea if they have any hidden weapons like a knife. You could bend down to try and administer first aid, and easily get gutted. Sounds like a very stupid law.

    In any other state except California, I would say that law is probably B.S., but being California, I'm not surprised. I can assure you, the likelihood of me using my trauma supplies on the person who tried to kill me is slim at best.

    My first aid supplies are for friendly victims, not dangerous murderers.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

  4. #34
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    Bark'n... Really am glad you stopped by this thread... this IS your bailiwick.

    And I wasn't kidding about my med kit...

    Duct tape, a belt, a knife, (the bailing wire was to fix the bike, and was replaced by a cel phone)

    Used my own belt as tourniquet after I hit the car...
    compound tib/fib, distal third, arterial involvement.

    It was only twenty minutes before the amberlamps arrived, though... And two years later I was back to work with my own leg, foot, and toes (albeit the leg a bit shorter).

    Now, there are a whole lot more elegant ways to treat gunshot wounds than to use my type of kit. But if you're alone, duct tape and clothing can make a very good compression bandage. That said, I really should get some quick clot and an Israeli Bandage, at the very least.

    And, if you don't have any training, I strongly suggest at least basic first aid, thru Red Cross...
    Bark'n likes this.
    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

  5. #35
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    I wasn't really sure how to answer the poll. I have a basic first aid kit in the car. But I also had both specific and improvised first aid training in school from a Yellowstone Park Ranger who has seen it all. He taught us how to use whatever is available to stabilize a person. But I don't carry a basic GSW kit. I probably should get one ASAP. Thanks for putting up the poll. It's an important thing for everyone to think more about.

  6. #36
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    Lima, you left out one important and common option: I do not have any gunshot wound/trauma (GSW) supplies though I do have the skills to use them.

    EMS is less than a mile from the house. Hospital is less than a mile from the house.

    The basics of the ABCs are not
    all that dependent on specific equipment or supplies.
    If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
    Andrew Jackson

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by oakchas View Post
    And I wasn't kidding about my med kit...

    Duct tape, a belt, a knife, (the bailing wire was to fix the bike, and was replaced by a cel phone)

    Used my own belt as tourniquet after I hit the car...
    compound tib/fib, distal third, arterial involvement.

    It was only twenty minutes before the amberlamps arrived, though... And two years later I was back to work with my own leg, foot, and toes (albeit the leg a bit shorter).
    You know, about 75% of good EMS is having a level head, good common sense, and the ability to improvise with what's available.

    You can really do an effective job at controlling life threatening hemorrhage without a bunch of fancy stuff. With a 20 minute EMS response to your accident, and having an arterial bleed in your fractured/shattered leg, you more than likely saved your own life with your quick thinking and ability to use an appropriate item (your belt) as a tourniquet.

    When it comes to "self help" situations, often the application of a tourniquet is the best and only way to effectively control severe bleeding because it is so difficult to apply an effective amount of direct pressure on the wound and a pressure point on yourself.

    Good job!
    Cory1022 and 10thmtn like this.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

  8. #38
    VIP Member Array Superhouse 15's Avatar
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    Been an EMT and then a paramedic for a few years. I keep a small pouch with a CPR barrier and some good Kerlix gauze, some 4x4s, gloves, bandaids (for the little ones) and vet-wrap in my diaper bag/man purse, and in the wife's purse. I have a bigger GSW kit in my range/gunsmith tool bag and another at the range where I work. I have a good first aid and more kit in both cars, and a good sized EMS bag at home. Mostly all I need is the bandaids, occasionally a skinned up knee on the kids needs some gauze. My EMS system does not use Quick Clot or tourniquets yet, old school doc as Director. I am a big believer in Kerlix or Krimptex or other "fluffy" surgical style gauze. It absorbs a lot more a lot quicker. One good trick to help store bulky gauze and such is to vacuum pack it. I use a vacuum thing I got at Wal Mart to seal meat and stuff before you freeze it. It cuts the bulk by half or more. We have even started packing our EMS bags at work this way.
    Try not to screw up so bad they name the screw up after you. (Station 15 saying)

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  9. #39
    Senior Member Array canav844's Avatar
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    Ever since reading this, I've given much thought to making sure I keep access to a good first aid kit, right now it's Kept in my vehicle so it's accessible from the house or if I'm out and about it's not far to access. I've been giving consideration to packing a ziplock baggy with some gunshot specific supplies to keep in my computer bag that's usually on me or in the same room as me. I've had both normal and first responder first aid and AED training from both the AHA and the Red Cross so I am pretty familiar with the use of such items; I've been keeping an eye out locally for training about having to administer self aid and not aid to another, and administer care beyond the normal first aid level and really get into good methods for handling severe trauma injuries.

    First-aid kits credited with saving lives in Tucson shooting

    "It would have been a lot worse" without those tools, Gwaltney said. The deputies were trained to use the kit, in a program the Pima force called "First Five Minutes," six months ago.

    Glock Certified Armorer

  10. #40
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    I'm really glad I've read this post. I typically take a US Army CLS (Combat Life Saver) kit with me when camping on going on long road trips, however I've never considered the need to have it for defensive carry purposes. It really makes perfect sense, especially when you consider that this might save the life of a loved one.

    I think the minimum I will carry is a Quick clot combat gauze, pressure bandage, and a CAT. However I wonder if it would be worth bringing along an NPK, a needle for chest decompression and plastic and tape for sucking chest wounds. The last 3 really wouldn't add much weight but addresses breathing problems that may be a result of the GSW.

    I would strongly suggest that those interested take a course in trauma medicine. Knowledge here can make a big difference, and some of the more complicated things like NPK's and chest decompression aren't quite as obvious as a pressure bandage or tourniquet.

    Now to find a suitable way to carry all of this gear!

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHTFGearLLC View Post
    I think the minimum I will carry is a Quick clot combat gauze, pressure bandage, and a CAT. However I wonder if it would be worth bringing along an NPK, a needle for chest decompression and plastic and tape for sucking chest wounds. The last 3 really wouldn't add much weight but addresses breathing problems that may be a result of the GSW.
    I went all out and purchased this stuff this week just waiting for it to get here. The only thing I'm not entirely sure on as far as what to do with it is the 14 gauge needle but the instructor friend who was advising me talked me into getting it anyway because someone else might know how to use it and I can always learn and then I'll have it.

    He's been kind enough to send me more info on trauma/combat medicine than I think I'll ever be able to read in a lifetime and I've been learning a LOT and relearning some stuff I'd forgotten.

    I wanted to take an EMT course this fall but apparently my local college only offers it in the spring so I have to wait until next semester which will work out nicely because I'll have had my baby by then.

    I already carry lots of 4x4 gauze, an ace bandage, lots of band-aids of different sizes, tape and plastic bags but it will be a little more comforting (and not at all adding too much weight or bulk) to add at least one roll of QuikClot gauze, some compressed gauze, a pressure bandage and possibly a CAT to my bag. If I'm feeling ambitious I might add the needle, too. I bought enough stuff for at least three blow-out kits with the plan to put one in the range bag, keep one at home and keep one mobile with me at least in the car if not on my person.

    Having the stuff on hand to treat a gun shot wound just makes a lot of sense when you carry a gun... especially when you participate in matches or teach gun classes. I've worked on ranges and been to classes with negligent discharges, etc, and while I'm supremely thankful that no one has been hurt I've seen a lot of DUMB things that could have gone very wrong.

  12. #42
    VIP Member Array Sticks's Avatar
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    Out of curiosity Limatunes, how much did the 3 kits cost all total?
    Sticks

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  13. #43
    Distinguished Member Array skysoldier29's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by limatunes View Post
    I went all out and purchased this stuff this week just waiting for it to get here. The only thing I'm not entirely sure on as far as what to do with it is the 14 gauge needle
    Stick the needle catheter set in between the 2 and 3 rib in the inter costal space to treat Tension Pneumothorax. Remove the needle while holding the catheter in place and tape it down.
    SHTFGearLLC likes this.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sticks View Post
    Out of curiosity Limatunes, how much did the 3 kits cost all total?
    Oh boy.. lol.. I did some shopping around and got some good deals on a few things through my instructor friend.

    The following was the "big stuff" I needed:
    2 CAT tourniquets
    4 Israeli bandages
    2 QuikClot gauze rolls
    1 14 gauge needle

    The rest of this stuff was to replenish supply and you can find pretty cheaply almost anywhere, a lot of it even at WalMart or medical supply stores:
    3 Triangular Bandages
    4 PriMed Compressed Gauze Bandage
    1 25 pk box of 4" x 4" gauze pads
    6 Petroleum Gauze pads
    2 4" Elastic Bandages (Ace Type)
    1 pair of curved forceps (honestly, I got these more to retrieve the things my son puts up his nose than for anything trauma related..lol)
    1 pair of straight forceps
    1 Thin Cinch Bandage

    My total for everything was around $200.
    The most expensive items were the tourniquets and the QuikClot gauze rolls. Those 4 items took up 60% of my total, easy!

  15. #45
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    To be honest, it actually makes me feel a little irresponsible for all of the times I've gone to a civilian range and not had GSW supplies on hand. Thanks Limatunes for bringing this to my attention!

    The needle, for Tension Pneumothorax, is for the purpose of releasing pressure in the chest cavity. Pressure there will force a lung to collapse, or at least make breathing difficult. There are a lot of products on the market that are designed to seal a sucking chest wound. I've been told by a number of medics in my unit that they typically suck. (generally they are comprised of a self adhesive plastic film with a one way valve). They suggest using squares cut from an MRE bag and lots of tape! I'd be interested to hear your opinion SkySoldier29.

    Thanks again
    Clay

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